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To add to Michael's answer; Rec-709 and S-log2 are both gamma curves applied to the raw video data when a video is recorded. This is much the same as how a digital camera applies the 2.2 gamma curve when recording a jpeg, and Lightroom applying a 2.2 curve when displaying a raw file. Without a gamma curve applied, a raw image/file would not look the way a ...


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It's the difference between the linear response of the digital sensor and the logarithmic response of human vision, which is taken into account by display devices such as monitors. An 18% grey card "properly" exposed is only RGB (127,127,127) after full gamma correction has been applied to the raw data. When using "log" recording, gamma ...


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I do a lot of technical imaging and I know about image noise. You question is to the point, let me give you a to the point answer. The difference in noise will probably be small and favorable in the short + bright exposure case. If I simplify a bit, noise basically comes from: noise related to the amount of photons of light captured during the acquisition (...


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It's all about etendue. The maximum amount of light available for an exposure is determined by the system etendue, which defines how spread out the light is. Etendue is defined by the angular extent (apparent/relative size) of the source/subject as seen by the objective element. And it is simultaneously/equally the angular extent of the objective element as ...


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