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Just about all modern digital cameras automatically capture EXIF metadata in the image files they record; I can't think of a camera that doesn't. This EXIF data includes date & time of capture, camera model number, and most importantly, exposure settings — aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. There are a few cases where this can't be captured, but for most ...


3

In general, Color Negative film is designed to be overexposed. Most can handle 1 stop over with no perceptible difference and things can look just fine up to +3 or +4 depending on the film. However, they can also start looking like garbage at as little as -1 under. This is why people say that it "likes to be shot at 200" - doing so forces you to be at ...


2

Assuming the lens you are using fully communicates with your Nikon D5600, that information is already attached in the metadata to all of your image files when you transfer them from your camera to your computer. There are at least a couple of remote possibilities that would leave you without this information: You are using an older Nikon or adapted lens ...


2

Possible dumb question: because pushing takes place during development, is it impossible for the negatives to be pushed? Push processing must occur during development. Once film has been developed the process is irreversible. You can't go back, un-develop it and develop it again. Once you have a negative, processing is locked in and you can't push it. ...


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