59

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


35

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (30, 15, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence ...


26

Yes, professionals do use auto mode. Professional paparazzi use auto mode almost exclusively and will sometimes even tape up the controls on the camera to prevent any settings being accidentally altered. You don't have to know how to shoot manual to make money out of photography, if for example you know which restaurants which celebrities go to... Other ...


26

You don't. You might be tempted to change the overall color cast by lying to the camera about the ambient white balance, but that will be very tricky to get right and to reliably repeat. The answer is to do this in post-processing. The job of the camera is to capture as much information about the scene as possible. If that is done well, then you have a ...


24

shutter speed 0.5 seconds This is likely to be a bit of your problem. The shutter causes vibration of the camera. So, too, does your hand pushing the release button. At faster speeds, this vibration does not affect the shot. Likewise, at very slow speeds (a few seconds +). But there’s a sweet spot somewhere between a second or two and ~1/30 where that ...


22

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


20

A digital sensor isn't really best described as "reading data". A much better way to describe it is "collecting photons" that are then converted into data by measuring the microscopic electrical charges they produce once the collection period is over. They do not have the capability to continuously record the changing state of each pixel well as they collect ...


20

How viable are "photography templates" where a professional gives the exact settings to use in a specific set up...to allow noobs to produce high quality photos? That sounds a lot like the "scene" modes built into most cameras. The camera evaluates the scene and chooses settings using an algorithm designed to produce a nice photo. Having the camera do ...


20

To reduce the processing time for long exposures, you want to turn off Long Exposure Noise Reduction. However, you may not want to give up the benefit of LENR. Long Exposure Noise Reduction (LENR) is Canon's nomenclature for in-camera dark frame subtraction. When you take a photo the camera will expose the image normally and then use the same settings to ...


19

4:3 (1.33) is a very good ratio. It's aesthetic and easy to get a nice composition in both horizontal and vertical orientation. It's also closer to square, which makes best use of optics (larger aperture, less vignetting, etc). All photography ratios that were actually designed are pretty close to 4:3 (1.33) : 4x5" (1.25), 5x7" (1.4), 8x10"(1.25) large ...


19

All of these scenes have something in common: they’re high contrast with many, many stops between the shadows and the highlights. If you were to meter for the shadows, then you’d blow the highlights (image 3). Meter for the highlights, and drown the shadows (images 1 and 2). Because you set evaluative metering, the whole frame is being taken into account ...


18

Most DLSRs with "silent" or "quiet" shutter modes don't change the speed at which the shutter is operated at all. The transit time each curtain takes to traverse the height of the sensor is constant regardless of the exposure time (shutter speed) selected or if a "quiet" mode is selected. Exposure time is determined by the time difference between the ...


16

This comes down to software patents — not on dates, but in a way that limits filenames. The only filesystem which is widely available and cross-platform is FAT, the venerable Microsoft DOS filesystem. It works on both old and new versions of Windows, worked on OS/2, works on Macs, works on Linux, and there are plenty of embedded implementations for the mini ...


16

Camera settings are never going to make this easy. Photographs need light to work, and while modern sensors are actually quite sensitive, they can't live up to our perceptions, because our brains take the dark, noisy image from our eyes and subconsciously make a mental model where the imperfections aren't noticed. You don't mention what lens you are using, ...


16

The size settings actually set two different things for any JPEG images taken by the camera: the resolution of the image being taken (the # x # size), and the quality setting for the JPEG compression for the image. The L, M, and S sizes vary individually by the camera, but the numbers at the top in the blue bar tell you the pixel dimensions. So, in this ...


15

Sadly, the feature's name is misleading. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that it's wrong, if not an outright lie. Turning this option on just enables you to use exposure compensation — it doesn't let you do anything actually "manual". If you enable this option, the ... menu at the lower right of the screen gains a +/- icon, as typically indicates exposure ...


15

Your question is based upon an assumption that is not entirely correct: that you can change just about everything in any shot you take. You can't. Things such as depth of field and shutter speed are set at the time the picture is taken. If, for example, the shutter speed is too slow to freeze a moving subject there is absolutely nothing you can do in post ...


15

You activated by mistake an advanced view mode. You can switch between view modes by pressing "info" (or maybe "display" for you) when in view mode. The view switchs in that order (sorry for image quality) : Classical View : your photo and some settings and nothing else Classical View with more information : your photo, some settings image quality (JPG/...


13

We already have some of the technology for this. Our term for remembering the sensor readings at each exposure point is "video", and what you are asking for is reconstruction of an optimal still image from multiple video frames. For an overview of Microsoft Research work on this, start here: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/...


13

First of all, the steam is hard to shoot on a photo. A lot of pictures you see with steam are composites of the photo + steam. To take a photo of the steam in real time you first need a dark background, and then you need to use a flash in a very focused way (use a snoot) pointing to the steam and only that. The flash normally is at 90° of the camera axis. ...


12

"Auto" can mean a wide range of things. Most DSLRs offer a "full auto" facility that tends to manage shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. But most of the modes on a DSLR that are other than absolute manual mode offer a substantial automated component. And even "Manual" may have auto features lurking in the shadows (literally in some cases). Your friends ...


12

In all of the semi-manual modes (aperture-priority, shutter-priority and program auto), you set one or more settings manually. The camera then chooses the rest of the parameters automatically to give you a nominally correct exposure. However, sometimes you want to override the camera's metering, either because it wouldn't correctly expose your subject or ...


12

You can do this with a single exposure. Use a longish shutter speed to expose the background and the flash to properly expose and freeze your subject. You'll likely need to have your camera on a tripod or other stable support, such as a table. This technique is often referred to as 'dragging the shutter' or 'slow shutter sync'. Most cameras will default to ...


11

Aperture: Use the maximum aperture (F1.8 if possible) Shutter Speed: Use the 600/(focal length * crop Factor)rule so as to not see star trails (Refer here in section 3. Camera settings). ISO: Highest possible for your camera that you find acceptable. Milky Way? You can use the application: Stellarium to find out if you are in the right time / place to view ...


11

One trick that I've heard recommended is to always check and reset your settings every time you take your camera out of the bag. Which really means every day when you start shooting. I can't remember anything, I'm lucky to remember to take the camera along.


11

You apparently have Highlight Correction activated. This forces the higher ISO limit (usually forcing it from 100 to 200, though you also have Expanded Sensitivity enabled, which gives you a broader ISO range starting at 80, thus now 160). So, there's nothing wrong with your camera. Mind you: Options you find that look superior may come with a downside. ...


11

I think you've slightly misunderstood how the shutter works. Initially, the first shutter covers the sensor and the second does not. The first shutter then slides away to expose the sensor, and the second shutter follows it to cover the sensor again. The shutters always move at the same speed, regardless of the exposure time. For a short exposure, the ...


11

In low-light settings the quality is just not good, blurry. I really just do travel photography so don't have time to mess with settings if I am capturing scenes of people out at night in a busy Chinese pedestrian street, for example. Then get a good phone that does computational photography very well. It will think for you more than and better than any ...


10

This behavior is caused by automatic exposure bracketing. I've had someone with a Nikon D5000 behaving the same way in manual mode, and it turns out that automatic exposure bracketing caused this problem. My Pentax K-5 behaves the same way if the drive mode is set to exposure bracketing in manual exposure mode. If this does happen to you again, make sure ...


10

That is the self-timer which does that. Press the left arrow and you will see the drive mode menu and choose the one with a rectangle rather than a clock. It will then take a photo in a fraction of a second, almost instantly after the shutter is fully pressed.


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