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The distribution of dynamic range appears to be different between the pictures. One picture, provides more stops of dynamic range above the midpoint. The other picture more stops below the midpoint. For example if each picture expresses twelve stops of dynamic range, one picture might distribute four stops below the midpoint and seven stops above the ...


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There are probably several things going on here all at once that can each contribute to the variability you have noticed. Aperture positions are not exact from one frame to the next, particularly with cameras that use mechanical linkages between the camera body and the lens to set the position of the aperture diaphragm, such as the vast majority of Nikon F-...


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The cameras produce different results because you're using the same raw processing settings for cameras that have different sensors and processing pipelines. You need to tweak the settings to match the camera. To improve highlight detail: Don't increase the exposure setting so much. Increase shadow and highlight recovery. This should work if the detail ...


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I'm assuming that you weren't using flash at this event. I think your problem might have been the lighting. Fluorescent and LED lights can vary in intensity 120 times a second (or more depending on the ballast) in the US, and depending on your shutter speed you can catch the light at a high point or low point in the cycle. A fast shutter speed (~1/125 or ...


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Manual mode works well under stable conditions and for stable subjects. With practice and experience (I.e. making many mistakes) it is also possible to learn how to adjust manual mode settings to produce successful pictures in changing conditions. However in event photography, often the most important thing is just getting pictures of reasonable. quality. ...


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Flash photography can be a challenge, mostly because it is the intersection of your camera mode and the flash modes. This will be in Canon-speak, but most camera systems are similar, using different names and acronyms. On Canon cameras, you have Manual (M), Program (P), Aperture Priority (Av) and Shutter Priority (Tv). The Canon flash system communicates ...


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Available light can vary dramatically with the presence of light sources, shadows, and the colours and reflectivity of subjects and background. Flash photography is probably the only kind (short of a controlled studio setup) where exposure will be similar keeping the same aperture/shutter/ISO settings. Both indoor and outdoor photography will need the ...


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Your question is a bit hard to answer, due to the lack of detail. What you see is most probably caused by your lighting setup. From what I read I understand, that you use 1 softbox at the top and 2 at the sides. This will create even lighting horizontally, but cause a brightness gradation from top to bottom. Without seeing the exact scene, you are lighting, ...


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I think my camera has a setting where each time you take a photo it changes some settings (aperature, shutter speed, ISO) so maybe yours does too?


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The answer to why your phone pictures are better that your “camera” pictures depends on what you are comparing and how you do photography. If you like fiddling with your photographs in editing then by all means use a manual camera. Turn off auto-focus. Turn off auto-exposure. Shoot RAW and fiddle away. Editing is a power tool for creative photography, but ...


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Kodak TriX is known for distinctive and traditional grain structure. Ilford Delta films are T grained. Lomography films are known for...well the fun is in the surprise. Consistent results with film come from consistent film selection, metering, scene conditions, filter selection, developer, processing times, and scanning. You have inconsistent results ...


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Unless you are using color negative film that can absorb a large amount of overexposure, I would disregard the 'shutter' times that are shown on the camera. I use an orange Wratten gelatin filter glued on, which with Acros film means ISO 25. Using f/150 on my light meter, I usually expose in the range of 2-8 seconds for daylit motifs. In this range, with ...


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