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8

i'm inside a lit room with the shutter speed being 1/125, aperture is 5.6 and ISO is 400 but every photo i take is still really under-exposed. If you take a picture with these settings, and if it's not underexposed, that's a helluva amount of light in your "lit room"! I have nearly 400 watts of LED lights producing over 40 000 lumens on the ceiling of my ...


2

Holding the camera up to the light is not a good way to check exposure or ambient lighting. Increase your ISO to 800 or 1600 or even 3200 and see if that solves your problem. If it does, then it is just a very dark environment. If it is still underexposed, your equipment is faulty.


0

More an observation than an answer: bouncing flash off a ceiling works the best with a low(ish) flat white ceiling. The location you did your shooting seems to have (as indicated e.g. on frame 15A) a high, angled ceiling of rather dark weathered planks. That is not a very reflective surface, with flash underexposure all but certain. I would expect a ...


1

Pentax AF280T (always set to green two-level auto flash operation, head tilted 40 degrees up) If you don't have one, you can download a .pdf Pentax AF 280T Manual. Forty degrees is not high enough for bounce flash in most situations. The light from your flash appears to have bounced off the ceiling and come down well past your intended subjects. Either ...


0

Low contrast, muddy color negative photos mean one thing: underexposure. Many of your images are lacking in light! I agree with Tetsujin's comment that it appears that you aimed the flash head up, intending to bounce, but did not get enough light this way. Either your flash wasn't powerful enough, the ceiling was too high, your flash head was not pointed ...


2

How does a camera determine aperture when in shutter-priority mode? It measures the amount of light reflected from various areas of the scene and calculates a desired exposure value based upon the metering mode used. It then selects an aperture value that, combined with the shutter duration and ISO setting you have selected, will result in the desired ...


3

The camera can be set to lock the exposure in auto modes using different buttons, but a system default is to lock in the exposure at the time you hold the shutter release half way down. So, you'd get to where you want to take a shot, go halfway down, the autofocus and exposure would lock in, and then you'd take the shot. Since you were using partial ...


1

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? No. Spot metering only measures a small area of the total image. It bases exposure calculations only on the small area which it measures and totally ignores the rest of the frame. If I spot meter...can I achieve identical results with EV compensation? It doesn't matter how one gets there. The same ISO, aperture ...


8

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? Metering, regardless of type, and exposure compensation are different functions with different purposes. Metering is used to obtain exposure exposure settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed), while exposure compensation is used to modify those values. It is basically the difference between nouns and adjectives. ...


4

Yes, you could match the spot metering result by some degree of EV compensation, if you knew how much compensation. We typically may not know, so we instead meter it to be able to manage that. Spot metering only analyzes the light intensity in that small spot. Regular metering looks at a much larger spot, closer to the full scene. Suppose you are ...


1

It doesn't matter how you arrive at the three exposure relevant parameters time,aperture, and ISO. Whether you set them manually or via any of the automatic modes doesn't change the final result. EV compensation just tells the exposure automatic that you want it to set the values for a darker or lighter result than it thinks to be correct; Spot metering ...


0

I do not know about modern cameras and how they are programed but in analog metering of the past Spot metering is exactly what is sounds like, metering a specific area or spot in the composition ( A percentage of the overall ) as opposed to the entire composition being averaged or even center weighted.


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Looks like it went through an xray machine at an airport


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