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4

f/2.6 is one-fourth stop less than f/2.8. Your Nikon D700 only displays apertures in one-third stop increments. The next widest f-number past f/2.8 it displays is f/2.5 Even when the lens is set to f/2.6, your camera has no way to display that number. Apparently it displays f/2.8 unless the lens can open up to f/2.5 or wider. If the lens is set to f/2.6 ...


4

That is the EE servo coupling switch. This is only for use with older lenses (non-G AF lenses). Modern AF-S G lenses don't have an aperture control ring (it's completely controlled by the camera body). When a non-G AF lens is mounted, the tab on the lens engages the switch on the camera when the lens's aperture ring is stopped down to is minimum aperture ...


4

Assuming all other potential issues are eliminated (and it sounds like you've done a good job of making sure of that), I would check the following: Does the aperture close on its own smoothly? Almost all Nikon F-mount lenses (including this one) have a mechanical linkage to the camera body. So you can easily check the aperture's action by taking the lens ...


3

What is that camera? The camera you've pictured appears to be a Nikon D750. How many cameras these days have it especially Nikon D5300? Well, pretty much all digital SLR cameras have full color screens so that they can display image previews. How much color they use in their menu and control screens is a bit more variable. This YouTube video about the ...


3

How it normally works with a lens with an aperture control ring: the camera will meter with the lens wide-open, and when you press the shutter, the lens will stop down until it is physically stopped by the setting of the aperture control ring. The camera will know ahead of time what the aperture ring's setting is because there is a position lever on the ...


3

Another possibility is the Custom Command Dial menu setting for aperture... it can be set to "aperture ring" for use with lenses that have the ring.


2

First off, please be sure to get the Nikon version of the YN568EX III. It will have the YN568EX III name displayed in gold lettering. The Canon version has silver lettering. If you want to use radio wireless (you probably do) To fully control the flash you need a YN622N radio set. A YN622N-TX transmitter or YN622N / YN622N II transceiver (combined ...


2

It's not the best photo I've ever taken, but this photo of the D5300 menu shows the previews of the six available options for its Info screen:


1

This totally depends on the circumstances. For example, if you are going to use the lens a lot, metal mount would be preferable. Similarly when shooting moving targets in low light (every artificially lit indoor environment is low light!) Sigma is better. However, don't ignore the weight aspect. If you are looking to have a wide angle lens all the time with ...


1

Price, weight and size, but in particular, it seems important that the DX lens projects a smaller image circle, large enough to cover the DX sensor, but it is not designed to fully cover the larger FX sensor. It can vary with zoom in individual lenses, but generally, large areas in the FX frame corners are dark with a DX lens. A reasonable simulation of this ...


1

Since a DX sensor is smaller, it is possible to cover the sensor area with a smaller lens even at the same focal length and maximum aperture. A smaller lens is a lighter, cheaper lens too, so DX lenses provide benefits for both the vendor and consumers.


1

Turn your YN-560IV over and look at its foot. The reason why you can't do HSS with it is that it's a single-pin speedlight, and can therefore only receive the sync (fire) signal on that pin. It doesn't have the other pins to receive TTL or HSS/FP commands from the camera. You need a speedlight that can perform HSS and that has all four of the pins Nikon ...


1

Nikon produces a battery adapter for the EN-EL14a battery in your camera. With this you can power the camera directly with a wallplug. This can be found for example here on amazon.com But keep in mind: the d3500 is not build to film over such a long time. so the sensor can get heat problems, damages and can die faster.


1

Normally I'd respond to questions like this with, "Buy either one. They're both good enough." But for astro work, there probably are at least three considerations you should be aware of. This is particularly the case since you have said in a comment that you are planning on using it with a 12 inch telescope, which usually means deep sky work rather than ...


1

First, your price comparison is not right — as I look on Amazon and B&H Photo right now, both are right below $400, with a three dollar price advantage for the Nikon camera. That's not a difference to make a big deal of. Second, these automatic comparison sites are terrible. They don't use any human judgement and focus on emphasizing nitpicky ...


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For astrophotography, you'll be looking at low light performance. That requires a good fast lens (usually a prime), and the ability to have actually useful high ISO. The specs mention neither. The high ISO on Nikon might suggest the Nikon is better, but the high ISO could be just so noisy that it's useless. So, back to the researching stage: what is your ...


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This is very broad & ultimately you're going to have to make the call yourself… Some points to consider. JPG can't use 16-bit. It technically supports 12-bit but most apps don't, so that's probably out. Consider JPG to be 8-bit for practical purposes. the Mac's preview is 'wrong' [for a given value of wrong]. CaptureNX-D knows exactly what the camera ...


1

You can't be in live-view to use the interval timer. Take out of live-view set up interval timer options. If you need live-view to frame your shots (maybe using a tripod and have eye-piece cover on), do that then switch from live-view and turn interval timer on.


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