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7

Cameras that have a mechanical focal-plane shutter have two curtains, a front and a rear. For longer exposures, the front curtain opens and starts the exposure, then the rear curtain closes to end the exposure. The mechanical shutter is relatively slow, so to create a quick exposure, the rear curtain must start closing before the front curtain fully opens. ...


2

The biggest obstacle with flash and the A1 is that its sync speed is pretty slow: 1/60s. But a modern speedlight/trigger's sync voltage will definitely be safe (under 5V in most cases), and you should just be able to use them the same way you would on a Canon dSLR. This Flickr discussion thread mentions successfully using a 580EX II on an A1, aside from ...


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Why not buy a flash from the A-1 era on ebay? I have a pile of Minolta flashes from that era that still work. The Minoltas might work on your Canon, but it would be safer to buy a flash that was made for that camera. Edit: If you want to use off-camera flashes, you can put a remote transmitter on the camera and connect the remote receivers to almost any ...


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Yes, no problem, a speedlight in Manual mode should easily work with the camera. Use flash Manual mode and set the power level accordingly for the scene and for your camera settings. IMPORTANT: To use Manual flash mode, the camera has to be set to Manual mode too, and Auto ISO turned off. The Manual flash cannot respond to the camera automation changing ...


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Look at https://files.canon-europe.com/files/soft24061/Manual/IXUS500IXUS430_CUG_EN.pdf and specifically the page 58. There are several modes: Auto Auto with red-eye reduction Flash on Flash off Slow synchro Specifically, test the "flash on". I also recommend using a low ISO speed such as ISO 50 or ISO 100 with flash. The rules change with flash: when you ...


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Flash sync speed has almost nothing to do with the duration of the flash. Flash sync speed is mostly about the shortest shutter time that allows the flash to fire while both shutter curtains are fully open. Most cameras with mechanical shutter curtains require anywhere from 2-4 milliseconds for the shutter curtains to transit from one side of the sensor to ...


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For focal plane shutters (most common on DSLR), the shutter is two curtains. The topic for you to research is "focal plane shutter". One curtain over the sensor moves to open the exposure, and then the other one moves to close it again. The exposure time is the delay between the two curtains. The idea is that both curtains move in the same direction, so ...


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I figured out the problem. The hotshoe on the Canon 6D was loose. It was causing the contacts on the yn622c-tx to not touch. Those contacts are a hair shorter than the Canon speedlite's contacts, which is why the 6D + speedlite was working fine. I found a video on how to fix a loose hot shoe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_neI06o3c0 After tighten the 4 ...


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