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76

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


33

Yongnuo doesn't really abide by a strict naming convention, but for the most part, here are the conventions I've discerned: 4xx—these are first-generation models. They have fewer features and tend to cost less. The only optical slaving they can do are the "dumb" modes (like SU-4) and cannot be used as wireless eTTL/CLS slaves, and do not do HSS. 5xx&...


30

The key here is how much light will be hitting sensor during flash, and how much during the rest of exposure. The sensor does gather light during the whole exposure; all of it is blended into one static image. In case the ambient light is much lower, it won't have nearly as much effect on the total light that reaches the sensor, and therefore only surfaces ...


29

Your camera will have anticipated the extra light provided from the flash, and adjusted the exposure to compensate. Because this extra light has been blocked out. The exposure is now wrong. Additionally, when the flash fires, your camera is likely to use a different white balance setting to accommodate the difference between the flash light and the other ...


29

Do I need a speedlight if I do not do people photography or portraits? Depends. But yes, speedlights can be used for more than portraiture. How else could one use speedlights? Other uses for flash include: High-speed photography. Flash bursts can be much faster than top shutter speeds on camera bodies; e.g., bullet strikes Macro photography. The thin ...


28

Let's look at the last picture. If you want a black background, you need to be careful not to spill light. It's relatively easy to control in a large studio, it's almost impossible in a small room. You need a background which is far away. You could even shoot outside at night if the weather allows it. You need some continuous light to show the trajectory. ...


28

Lighting a large group "evenly" with flash requires a powerful flash placed far enough away that the distance between closest and furthest subject is a small fraction of the distance from the flash to the closest subject. Consider the diagram Where A is the light source and B-E are subjects: A----BCDEF The distance A->B is 4. The distance from B->F is also ...


26

The main speedlight features to consider are: Power Speedlights (hotshoe flashes; distinct from outlet-powered studio strobes which are also flashes) are powered by AA batteries. As strobes go, they're the low end of the totem pole when it comes to power, so every spare bit of it you can scrape together is useful. The power output of a flash is generally ...


26

The use of flash actually pre-dates electric lighting, the first flashes being entirely chemical. Nowadays the main reason for using flash is that a flash can be considerably brighter than continuous lighting because it only has to be on for a very short time (while the photo is being taken). A continuous light source that was the same brightness as a ...


25

"flash does not harm infants but just to be sure instead of using direct flash I'm going to point the flash at the wall/put it in this big softbox and turn the flash's power way down" Parents of small babies are not rational (especially if this is the first baby), don't show them research and don't try to convince them - make a big show about doing stuff to ...


23

Looks like it's related to image stabilization as Tetsujin suggested. Managed to replicate the issue. Switched off the IS and the Ghosting went away. It is a new IS lens (Latest Sigma 105mm macro IS). Guess I just need to remember to switch it off in these circumstances. For those who are interested, here is the final shot


22

NimH battery care and feeding has occupied too much of my life in recent years. :-) It is significantly better for NimH batteries NOT to discharge them fully before recharging them. NimH life can be enhanced substantially by never discharging them fully on any occasion. Even when using multiple sets during a day's shooting, if you can manage to leave the ...


22

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


22

Will need flash to achieve good results... You'll not get "excellent quality results" using flash in this situation. Theatrical productions are lit with theatrical lighting. If you want your images to look like the show did to the audience, you need to capture what light the production is using to illuminate the scenes for the audience. You've got ...


22

Sigma's product manual says: Please do not use Optical Stabilization in the following situations. When the lens is mounted on a tripod Bulb (long time exposure) As I understand it, the problem is as follows. Stabilization works by having some lens elements move around to correct for the the movement of the whole assembly. As Isaac Newton ...


20

If you take a lot of flash photos, with the flash pointed directly at the subjects, you'll notice that eyes only sometimes go red: it depends on the angle of the eye with respect to the flash & lens. If the eye is facing off to one side, or outside the main area painted by the flash, it may not appear red. Having one red eye could happen if, for example:...


20

That is a true statement, but it misses the big point. (As the shutter would see it), it would simply become continuous light, like any incandescent light bulb (always On for the full shutter duration would be indistinguishable from continuous light). Like continuous light, there would be no motion stopping ability at all. And even a 500 watt light bulb ...


20

Why? Fundamentally, it's because of the way flashes work. Flashtubes generate light by discharging a capacitor through a xenon-filled tube. The resulting electric arc produces bright white light. But a continuous electric arc would produce a lot of heat, which would weaken the tube, and it would consume a lot of power, which batteries cannot supply for long....


17

With a more expensive speedlight/flash you typically gain: TTL Metering Ability(e-TTL/i-TTL/P-TTL) Capability to Zoom Heavier duty, especially around the shoe Additional power/guide number Ability to swivel, or in additional directions Weather sealing Wireless abilities, often above just being an optical slave Reliability Ability to control from the camera ...


17

I want to know the needs/thinking in photography that leads to it It starts off with you needing more light in a given situation. Either you getting extremely grainy photos due to low light, or you are in need of a wider lens but can't afford the slower maximum aperture, or you are struggling to eliminate camera shake with slower shutter speeds. However ...


17

The most typical reasoning for this circular obstruction is the use of a lens hood that is obstructing the flash. It could also be caused by a rather large lens itself getting in the way as well. A similar effect can be found when a wide angle lens is used that is beyond the coverage of the flash. I would consider what lenses you were using, at what focal ...


17

It stands for "Prontor-Compur connection": "Prontor" has its origins in the Italian word "pronto", meaning ready (and was a leaf shutter made by Alfred Gauthier). "Compur" is derived from the word "compound" (the "Compound" was a long-lived series of leaf shutters made by Friedrich Deckel).


16

Yes, all those flashes are from people who don't know any better, usually using point and shoots or full auto mode. Those flashes do not help the resulting image in any way, but today's cameras (thankfully?) manage to get an acceptable image anyway (probably with the same settings it would have used for no flash auto mode), a few years ago each of those ...


15

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that "...


15

The guide number represents the light output of the flash alone, with no ambient light factored in. Unless you are using slow sync flash, the ambient light is just assumed to have no meaningful impact. And, when you do want it to be a factor, the simple isolated number is much easier to actually use to figure out your light ratios. Why doesn't the ambient ...


15

It looks to me like they dragged the shutter. That is they set the shutter speed to something longish, but then used a flash. The model is illuminated by the flash with the camera still. Then after the flash has finished, the camera is rotated around the frame's center causing lights in the background to form the radially blurred pattern you see. The model ...


14

according to this post on strobist flash tubes are usually rated between 1000 and 5000 pops. This is 1000-5000 full power consecutive pops until the tube starts to lose power. If you don't use full power the tube will last longer, if you don't subject your flash to consecutive pops the tube will last longer, if you don't let it heat up it will last longer, ...


13

There is a very real danger of producing a very low quality photograph of your baby while disturbing them at the same time if you use a flash from less than 1m away. Bounce the flash off a white ceiling or a large reflector to avoid the danger of having to shake your head every time you look at these pictures 10 years from now.


13

What you are going wrong is not giving the camera enough latitude. You fixed the aperture and ISO, so all the camera can do is set the shutter-speed and flash power. It must be not as low-light as you think because most often you would get an under-exposed image doing what you are doing. The camera has a shutter-speed range it can use with the flash. The ...


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