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20

That is a true statement, but it misses the big point. (As the shutter would see it), it would simply become continuous light, like any incandescent light bulb (always On for the full shutter duration would be indistinguishable from continuous light). Like continuous light, there would be no motion stopping ability at all. And even a 500 watt light bulb ...


20

Why? Fundamentally, it's because of the way flashes work. Flashtubes generate light by discharging a capacitor through a xenon-filled tube. The resulting electric arc produces bright white light. But a continuous electric arc would produce a lot of heat, which would weaken the tube, and it would consume a lot of power, which batteries cannot supply for long....


11

In principle, your rationale is correct. However, there is no usable period during which an ordinary single flash is emitting at constant power. The power of a typical on-camera flash quickly increases from zero to its maximum value in about 0.1 ms (i.e. 1/10 000th s). Then it exponentially decreases with a half-life of roughly 1 ms; i.e., it decreases to ...


7

Let's discuss what each of the terms mentioned in your question means. Fill Flash: When there is enough overall light in the scene to take a picture, but there are shadows that need to be smoothed out, fill flash can be used to lighten the shadows. Even outdoors on a sunny day, if the sun is high overhead or behind your subject you can use fill flash to ...


7

Others have addressed the technical side of why strobe flashes are extremely fast. There are alternative photo lighting technologies which do exactly what you say. This answer addresses the pros and cons of them: LED-based 'flashes' as seen in phones etc. – these turn on a bright LED for the time it takes to take a photo, then turn it off. They're commonly ...


6

Yes. What you're envisioning is something that's actually used by some TTL-capable radio triggers to allow faster shutter speeds with manual flashes and studio strobes: it's called tail-sync (aka "HyperSync", "Supersync", etc.). The problem, as Loong has pointed out, is that the light/power output of the flash pulse is not even and constant during the ...


6

The problem that is solved via high speed sync has nothing to do with the power of the flash and everything to do with the curtain transit time of the camera. Above a camera's sync speed the second curtain begins to close before the first curtain is completely open. Therefore very precisely timed multiple flashes must be emitted from the flash as the open ...


6

Is this true also when the flash is used in High Speed sync mode? Or does in this case the shutterspeed affect the flash light too? Shutter speed has some effect with HSS, but for different reasons. With high speed sync, the flash fires many times as the slit between the first and second shutter curtains move across the sensor. The higher the shutter speed, ...


6

Just to get the full understanding: Only to freeze fast moving subjects which need shorter shutter speeds than the flash's burning speed HSS is really required? Sort of. That is a common reason to use HSS, but there are also other use cases where HSS may be preferable to using ND filters. When you also want to use narrower apertures interspersed with wide ...


5

TL;DR: Yeah, you guessed right. You can't get HSS or TTL cross-brand. Flash hotshoe protocols are mostly brand-specific TTL and HSS are hotshoe protocol-specific. That is, you need a Canon camera to do HSS with Canon HSS-compatible flashes; and with a Sony A-7, you'd need a Sony HSS-compatible flash (i.e., probably a Sony HLV speedlight, or 3rd-party ...


5

This behavior is perfectly normal for a Canon 60D, and most other Canon EOS bodies. When you select Av Mode with E-TTL in lower light environments, the camera assumes you want to expose the entire scene correctly for the ambient light and then use the flash to illuminate your subject in the foreground. If you wish to disable this slow sync feature, use ...


5

The general idea of a leaf shutter seems to have started from leaves on trees. The earliest leaf shutters had a relatively large, flat opaque "leaf" with a "stem" sticking out from one end where it pivoted. This shutter design has a number of shortcomings though. The shutter speed isn't very controllable, it's nearly impossible to get it really fast, and it ...


5

A leaf shutter is located in the lens of a camera, rather than in front of the focal plane inside the body of the camera. They are made of several metal blades that fit together in a circular arrangement with the intersection of all of the blades overlapping in the center. When a leaf shutter opens the hole gets gradually larger from the center to the edges. ...


5

If the flash were to light up before the shutter opens and turn off after the shutter closes, there would never be flash sync problems. There would also be lower efficiency as some of the light output by the flash that is captured by the lens would not be captured by the camera. It takes about 2-4 milliseconds for a mechanical shutter curtain to transit ...


4

You can use higher shutter speeds than your sync speed, but it is not "true" HSS. PocketWizard calls this feature "Hypersync." In "true" HSS, with hotshoe flashes, the flash sets out a serious of pulses timed to go with the travel of the curtain slit across the sensor so the whole sensor is evenly illuminated by the flash. This is not what Hypersync does....


4

Godox has several lines of flashes (everything from speed lights to studio strobes) that are manual with HSS. The challenge is HSS requires the trigger interface with the cameras proprietary flash protocols and so if you're doing all that you might as well do TTL. Godox gets around this by making HSS an off-camera only function. So the flash has a single ...


4

Most low-cost (say < US$50/set) flash radio triggers do not support eTTL or HSS. They are "manual-only" triggers. It the triggers/flash only have a single contact/pin they're definitely manual-only, because that big contact/pin in the center of the hotshoe "square" is the sync signal and that's the only signal that can physically be communicated. There ...


4

Fuji HSS There's an easy way to tell if your Fuji camera does HSS. Unlike all the other camera brands supported by the Godox X system, Fuji's HSS setting is controlled by the camera, not by the transmitters. If you have a camera menu selection to set AUTO FP(HSS) on the flash, then you can do HSS. If you don't, you can't. HSS was added as a feature to ...


4

Started out as a comment to Caleb's nice answer and accidentally turned into answer... To start a (glowing) discharge high voltage is needed (called breakdown voltage). When the vacuum is broken down the resistance drops almost instantly from near infinity to near zero resulting in insanely high current and low voltage. Only hard current sources can ...


4

You make the assumption that light drops significantly between two flashes. This isn't true: (full story at https://neilvn.com/tangents/high-speed-flash-sync/) Since doing this properly is likely dependent on the light dropout characteristic of the flash bulb, it can be done as an open-loop.


3

No, the D3300 does not support high-speed sync, (none of the D3x00 or D5x00 bodies do) so you're limited to 1/200s and below shutter speeds. Anything faster, and you will have black bars on the image. In addition, your (one assumes Neewer) TT-560 is a manual-only flash and cannot perform TTL or HSS, which is why it's so super-cheap. It only has the "sync/...


3

The Nikon D5500 does not feature an Auto FP flash sync setting. This is the name Nikon uses for high speed sync. So although the SB800 does support AFP, your camera is not capable of using it. The only practical way to overcome it would be to use a studio type flash that allows you to adjust the duration of the flash at constant output to longer than about ...


3

There's no way to use HSS between your 6D and 430EX or YN560III with those triggers. The triggers themselves are not capable of syncing at faster than 1/320 second for a single pulse. Some triggers that communicate with the camera via the hot shoe such as the Pocket Wizard MiniTT1 transmitter and FlexTT5 receiver are capable of HSS with Canon flashes, but ...


3

Each camera with a mechanical shutter has a speed that is the fastest it is capable to sync with a flash. It is usually around 1/200 to 1/250 sec, but can be much faster or slower depending on the camera. At speeds faster than this the second curtain of the shutter begins to close before the first curtain is completely open. The sensor (or film) is not being ...


3

I guess it depends on how you define disadvantage. There are times when you may want to balance dim ambient light in the background with your subject in the foreground that is illuminated by your flash. In order to do so without requiring an ISO value higher than you wish might require a shutter speed much slower than 1/320. Sure, but with 1/320 (Auto FP) ...


3

Thanks to @YaoBoLu and the quoted article: Understanding Nikon's Auto FP High-Speed Flash Sync Mode, I think I get it. Here's a summary of what I understood. The key appeared to be in what Auto FP means. For example, let's say 1/320 (Auto FP) is used. This would mean: for each shutter speed lower than or equal to 1/320s, the flash will work "normally", ...


3

Shutter speed does not affect regular speedlight mode exposure. The speedlight flash is faster (shorter duration) than the shutter speed, so it does not matter (to the flash) how much longer the shutter is open (ambient will be affected). Shutter speed absolutely does affect HSS flash, which is simply a continuous light same as sunlight, same as ...


3

The article HS or HSS? What is the Difference? talks about the difference between High speed sync, HyperSync, and Hi-Sync, and explains the difference more clearly than I can here, so go read it. There are some whizzy animations that might help you visualize each one. To summarize: High Speed Sync: The flash fires many low-power pulses of light to simulate ...


3

Personally, I think it all comes down to how much you want one of the Godox bigger-than speedlight options. That's pretty much all the Godox system can give you that the Nissin Air system can't at the moment. I LOVE the NAS system so far I would say keep it, then. If it does what you need and you love it, you should keep it. Most of the reviews I've ...


3

The YN-560 series are manual only flashes, so they don't support things like TTL or High Speed Sync, which is what you need to shoot above the camera's sync speed. The 5D Mark II's flash sync speed is 1/200s. For Yongnuo products, you are looking at the YN-568EX II or the YN685, which has a built in radio receiver. You will need a YN-622C or YN622C-TX to ...


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