40

You're probably better off with native-mount lenses For the most part, no, you can't mix'n'match lenses from different brands of cameras, because they'll usually use different mount systems. The mount system specifies how the lens and camera body physically link, and may also specify electronic communication between the lens and camera. If the lens and ...


15

The most important thing you'll need to know is the "lens mount" that both your lenses and your body use - examples here are Canon EF, Nikon F and Micro Four Thirds. Once you've done that, you'll need to find the flange focal distance (FFD) for both the lens and the body - handwaving slightly, the flange focal distance is how far the lens needs to be from ...


8

Unfortunately not, as this lens does not have a built-in AF motor, and neither do the D3X00 or D5X00 camera families from Nikon. Your camera will only have autofocus with Nikon lenses marked AF-S, or compatible lenses from other makers that include built-in focusing motors.


8

Yes, there is no reason that these would not work, assuming that their filter diameter matches your lenses, of course. As with lenses in general, there have been improvements in design and manufacturing which may make newer filters nicer. For example better coatings are available, and older filters are less likely to be multi-coated. You may also find newer ...


8

As Matt noted, there's no general reason that you can't use them if the diameters match up with your lens elements. The only thing I would note in addition to that is that you may run into linear polarizers which may not work correctly with your camera's metering and autofocus systems. That's not really an issue for focussing if you manually focus. For ...


7

For the vast majority of lenses, i.e. almost all lenses, a general lens cap would fit, as long as long as it had the right diameter. There are a few exceptions, e.g. ultra wide angle lenses that have a protruding front element, as e.g. in this question where you need a special lens cap compatible with the lens, but those are really special cases.


6

No. The six SLR mounts that you can easily adapt to Canon EOS with simple ring adapters are Leica-R, Nikon F, Contax/Yashica, Pentax K, M42, and Olympus OM. But Minolta AF lenses work just fine on Sony Alpha (A-mount) dSLRs and dSLTs without any adapters. And you can, of course, adapt these to mount on the Sony E-mount (NEX). But not for Canon EOS. When ...


6

To cut a long story short, you are using too fast a shutter speed. The shutter consists of two black 'curtains' that travel down over the sensor, one after the other, allowing exposure of the shot. Both these curtains have to be out of the way when the flash fires, otherwise they will block part of the sensor and you get a black bar in your shot. Using a ...


6

Since Canon introduced the EOS system in 1987, all EOS EF mount lenses will work on all EOS EF (full frame, APS-H) or EF-S (APS-C) mount bodies. This means they will be functional in terms of automatic metering and auto focus. What field of view each lens will yield on a digital body depends on the size of that camera's sensor. For a closer look at that ...


6

Your friend is wrong. You don't have to get a 55-something telephoto zoom, unless you don't want a gap in focal length coverage. A lot of us would say that the 55-75mm range probably doesn't matter, while the additional length of a 300mm lens over 200mm lens is probably worth it. If you do care about range coverage without a gap, then getting an 18-300 ...


6

In the past when attempting to install Photoshop on Linux, I've had little success. In reality there is probably no foolproof solution that will allow Photoshop to run without any problems, though there may be a few more things you can try: Install using PlayOnLinux PlayOnLinux is a program similar to Wine, though is designed primarily to run Windows games ...


6

This camera uses Compact Flash (CF) cards. You can buy a decent multiple-format USB card reader which has CF support for under $20. You can even buy just-CF readers for less than that. This should Just Work, without any hassle. And, as a bonus, if you're planning to sell the camera, you can thrown in the reader so that your buyer doesn't have any hassle ...


6

Well, if the camera hotshoe and the flash are both ISO-compliant, you can use one system's flash on another's hotshoe, and the flash will fire in sync with the exposure being made. But that's the only function you will have. No TTL, no high-speed sync (FP), no menu commanding of the flash, no flash exposure compensation, no wake-up from sleep, possibly no ...


6

If the lens caps weren't compatible, filters also wouldn't be compatible. So yes, the thread specs are the same between lens manufacturers. Only the diameter of the filter mount / lens cap varies.


5

It depends. The Canon flashes you listed in your question use pulsed light from the Master unit to tell the Slave units when to fire and how much power to emit. This allows proprietary communication between the Master and Slave units and allows for use of Canon's E-TTL automatic exposure system as well as permits the photographer to set manual power levels ...


5

No, you can't. In general, lenses made for one brand can't fit on another brand without an adapter, and in this case, there are no good options. Using a "naive" mechanical adapter would end you up with a macro lens that you would have to focus by moving the whole camera (or using a helicoid/bellows equipped adapter set) and that you could not set the ...


5

I own a Canon EOS 1100D camera that was released in 2011. What lenses are still compatible with this model? Canon EF lenses: All of them. Every single one made since 1987 when the EF mount was introduced. Canon EF-S lenses: All of them. Every single one made since 2004 when EF-S lenses were introduced along with the EOS 20D. Other lenses made by third ...


5

AF-P lenses are a newer Nikon technology that doesn't work with older Nikon bodies, such as your D50. There is no way to adjust any settings or update firmware to make your camera any more compatible with this lens. From Nikon's product page for the lens: The number of cameras compatible with both lenses is limited. Even for compatible cameras, firmware ...


4

This is old question but problem is still actual on old lenses. What you need is protocol interface which converts aperture change command from camera to lens. Please see my article at this link where is problem cause and it's solution described in detail http://butterflybikers.cz/index.php/cz/elektronika/item/1-canon-eos-protocol-convertor-for-old-sigma-...


4

You are using a shutter speed faster than 1/250s. The D7000's "maximum sync speed" (aka x-sync speed) is 1/250s. Most dSLRs these days have focal-plane shutters in them, where the shutter speed is determined by the size of the gap between the first and second shutter curtains as they sweep across the sensor. The smaller the gap the faster the shutter ...


4

What matteres is not the manufacturer of a lens, but its lens mount. In fact, there are two things that have to be considered. First and most important aspect is probably the flange focal distance. This is the distance from the mounting flange (the metal ring on the camera and the rear of the lens) to the film plane. In order to achieve infinit focus, this ...


4

In general, all camera brands have their own proprietary system for connecting lenses. Modern mounts are all bayonet style, which means they twist and lock rather than needing to screw on, as older lenses did. These mounts are not interchangeable, so you'll need a lens that matches your camera bodies. Most brands have different sub-variants of their mount, ...


4

This lens uses a screw driven AF, meaning the body drives the AF. The D5xxx series and D3xxx series of cameras need AF-S lenses in order to AF with them.


4

It will work. Any EF lens will mount on any EOS camera - as long as it's not EF-S or EF-M (which the 50mm f/1.8 isn't). In addition, MP-E and TS-E lenses will also mount and work on any EOS camera.


4

Yes, it will fit, but AF won't work (all D lenses rely on an AF motor in the camera body and the D3100 doesn't have one), so if you buy it, you'll only able to use it as a manual focus lens.


4

Teleconverters are designed for use with longer focal length lenses. Many are optimized for a specific focal length range of telephoto prime lenses. There are both marketing reasons why this is so, but there are also technical reasons. Just as it is the case that zoom lenses with very wide focal length ranges must make compromises in image quality to allow ...


4

Lenses advertised as using the Sony E-mount (Wikipedia) are compatible with Sony NEX cameras, including your NEX-F3. The Meike-E-35-1.7 lens you linked to has an E-mount bayonet, so it is compatible with your camera. The Helios 44M-2 lens you linked to has an M42 mount bayonet, so it is not directly compatible with your camera. However, you can get a M42-...


4

Yes, because you are using a crop camera, you can use the EW-83J hood on your 24-105 without any vignetting or other effects. Here is a chart that shows many other alternate lens and hood combinations. Alternate Hoods


4

Consider supporting your local economy by purchasing a lens at a local camera store. Someone should be happy to assist you. Lenses are often organized by mount, so all lenses of interest should be located together. You can try them in store to ensure they work with your camera. When searching online, look for lenses that specifically state they are for Canon ...


3

Your shutter speed is too fast. It can happen even if you're using same brand flash & camera. Basically check the normal sync speed of the flash - it will usually be 1/200 or 1/250th of a second. If you set up your camera to go higher than that you will end up with that dark banding that you describe due to the length of time the flash is 'on' in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible