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6

The SR-1 was launched in 1959. It’s possible that your copy could be 61 years old! Even if it was stored in an airtight box, oils and greases will break down over that time and become tacky. Add actual use, dirt and dust, and that tacky can become gritty. The result is that functions begin sticking and then eventually freeze. Most people will buy one of ...


3

There are three likely causes of this kind of mark on the film. First, bromide drag from insufficient agitation. Second, surge marks from excessive agitation. Neither one is very likely for film developed by a commercial lab, though they're certainly a possibility. The third possibility is a light leak -- not in the camera, but in the cassette, ...


3

In general, Color Negative film is designed to be overexposed. Most can handle 1 stop over with no perceptible difference and things can look just fine up to +3 or +4 depending on the film. However, they can also start looking like garbage at as little as -1 under. This is why people say that it "likes to be shot at 200" - doing so forces you to be at ...


2

If the GN is 36 (meters) at ISO 100, it is x2 or GN 72 at ISO 400 (meters). Specificaly new GN = old GN x square root(new ISO / old ISO) Guide Number = distance x f/stop Number. This takes the Inverse Square Law into account. So at GN 72 and f/16, direct flash exposure is GN 72 / f16 = 4.5 meters. Or the other way for example, GN 72 / 8 meters is f/9....


2

Possible dumb question: because pushing takes place during development, is it impossible for the negatives to be pushed? Push processing must occur during development. Once film has been developed the process is irreversible. You can't go back, un-develop it and develop it again. Once you have a negative, processing is locked in and you can't push it. ...


1

Some years ago, there were a number of "liquid emulsion" products, which allowed you to "paint" a surface with sensitized gelatin similar to that on enlarging paper. Once dried (in the dark) this could be exposed, either under an enlarger or in a camera, then developed much like a print to show an image (negative of the scene, though if on a black surface ...


1

In the early days, photo films sported low sensitivity to light. Indoor photography was first practiced in studios equipped with large bay windows and skylights. Color films where initially fabricated to operate under daylight conditions. These films are type D for work in ambient daylight conditions. The Kelvin temperature scale was the favorite of ...


1

There's no two ways about it - film photography is an expensive hobby. I calculated that every time I press the shutter button on my Rolleiflex, it costs me about £2, considering film, development and scanning costs. You are going to have to bite the bullet to some extent. But I think film photography is a fun and rewarding hobby - it's worth keeping that in ...


1

The light leak only appears on one of two rolls of film: This suggests the problem is not the camera. The light leak only appears on the first three images: This would suggest to me either a film handling issue, or a minor issue with the film cartridge. I would try another couple of rolls of film to see if the problem re-occurs, if it does not than the ...


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