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47

The ISO of a film roll indicates how sensitive that whole film roll is to light. That's a chemical property of the film roll, which you cannot change shot by shot. The ISO "setting" on your camera does not actually set the ISO of your film, as that is physically impossible. It does tell (the light meter of) the camera what the sensitivity is of the ...


37

The exterior camera on the LEM was basically a miniaturized television camera, all based on state of the art late 60's video technology. A television camera looking at the lunar surface in full daylight without even the benefit of an atmosphere to diffuse the harsh light will be extremely susceptible to all the foibles of the video camera tubes of the era. I ...


22

To get down to the mechanics of how these challenging conditions could enable you to "see through" the astronaut, I think what is happening is this. In a TV camera of that era, the light effectively created an image of electrical charge (or some change in electrical properties) in the imaging surface, and that change was read off by a scanning ...


19

In addition to Saaru's good answer, I wanted to point out that the reason you might have been switching around the ISO setting and not really noticing much difference is because film has reasonably good exposure latitude, and images can be "recovered" with some success from underexposed and overexposed film. Probably the machines/operators at the ...


14

The TV cameras of that era were of the vacuum tube type. Artifacts of various types degraded the images they generated. To name a few – ghosting, smearing, burn-in, comet tails, luma trails both negative and postitive and blooming. What you are seeing is a trail of a scan of a bright highlight that is generating a trail. All this was common to TV images of ...


8

If I have ISO 100 speed film in a camera and choose to expose for ISO 400 speed film, I'm underexposing by two stops. It is true that ISO 400 film is more sensitive (and thus brighter) than ISO 100 film. But when I change my camera's ISO setting to '400' I'm not actually changing the film's sensitivity to ISO 400 - I've still got ISO 100 film loaded! What I ...


7

Before doing anything else, I would suggest making as high a quality and high resolution scan (2400dpi not interpolated) as you can using a flatbed scanner and save the image in an uncompressed file format like TIF, not JPG. Do that through the existing glass before doing anything to recover the photo. The file will be huge, but not an issue for current ...


6

If you've overexposed, you want to pull rather than push your film. Film pushing involves developing to higher than normal contrast, which causes a given exposure to produce more density. Since this is proportional to exposure, exposures barely recordable move up to low-mid tones, middle exposures move up to high-mid, and highlight level exposures "...


4

This color photograph is comprised of dye (not ink) imbedded in a gelation layer. My advise is to soak this picture, frame, glass, and all in a shallow pan of water. Allow to soak for several hours. After the soak, try to gently separate the picture from the glass. If still stuck, add a thimble full of dishwashing detergent. If this works, place the wet ...


4

Others have explained why you should set the ISO on the camera properly to reflect the film used. However, note that there is a different control you can use after that: exposure compensation, often with a symbol that looks like a ± or a black and white gradient. On old mechanical systems you can see that they are actually on the same knob; the ISO setting ...


4

Based on the information you provide, the suspected cause for this issue is higher than ususal friction in the lens' bayonet mount and in its aperture actuation mechanics. Possible reasons are: Damage, e.g. bent parts or corrosion Incorrect assembly Dirt has accumulated Whether repair is required or cleaning and lubricating will solve the issue is ...


3

When people say they "push" their film, what they almost always mean is that they "pulled" exposure (i.e. underexposed) and as a result the film needs to be "push processed". Since you "pushed" exposure, you need pull processing to compensate. That is, if you think you overexposed by about two stops, then under develop ...


2

The first easy diagnosis you can do is to put in a new roll of cheap film. Don't try to use this roll for shots you intend to keep – this is for diagnostic purposes only. See if the camera "acts" normally with the new roll: take pictures, advance the film as normally after each shot. If it seems like it takes more cranks on the advance lever until ...


1

ISO 100 (EV9/EV11;EV10/EV12) is w/in the exposure latitude of HP5 (many rate it at ISO 200 normally), you don't really need to adjust the developing time at all (you'll just get higher contrast results)... but if you decide to, I wouldn't go much more than 1 stop.


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