8

I am reading Bryan Peterson’s book, Understanding Flash Photography... Just my humble opinion, but not the source I'd go to. Peterson is more of a landscape/nature photographer and his knowledge of flash is pretty antiquated (hence your reliance on guide numbers and distance scales). I'd recommend starting with something like Neil van Niekerk's website or ...


6

The sync voltage limit on a Cactus V5 is 300V. As long as your flash doesn't go over that, you should be fine. In addition, any dRebels that are newer than the 300D have a sync volt limit of 250V on the hotshoe, according to Chuck Westfall, the technical rep for Canon, answering a question in a 2007 tech tips article for the digitaljournalist.org: I ...


6

Sorry, there is no way to make older studio strobes automatic, or even semi-automatic. You must use Manual mode for every photo. 1/200 is the max sync speed on your camera, but when using radio triggers, there is sometimes a very slight delay introduced. To be safe start with with 1/160 f/8 ISO 100. You can then adjust the power of the strobes to get the ...


5

The easiest poor man's way would simply be to take a simple trigger that works off a circuit closing. Remove the switch, wire up a bunch of additional switches in series and the circuit won't be completed unless all switches are pressed. It requires some manual work, but is probably the absolute cheapest way you could accomplish the goal.


5

I use this: http://amzn.com/B002W3IXZW from cowboy studio or if you have more money I would get this: http://amzn.com/B00BBQ8IDS from Pocketwizard which was just released. Many people also praise the inexpensive Yongnuo transmitter/triggers. The 60D even has a built in wireless transmitter. The 60D's built-in flash can act as a controller or commander to ...


5

Yes, there is the possibility that vintage strobes with high trigger voltages can damage wireless receivers/transceivers attached to them. The danger would only apply to the receiver/transceiver physically connected to the flash via either hot shoe connection or PC cord. There is no danger to the transmitter and camera connected to the receiver via wireless ...


5

The Yongnuo YN568EX II flashes have built in optical receivers that operate on Canons optical wireless system that uses very short pulses of light to communicate. You need an optical Master flash (such as another YN-568EX II) or Canon compatible wireless optical controller (such as the YN-ST-E2) on the camera to control them wirelessly without attaching ...


5

Using the Godox TT350N as a means to control your other Godox speedlight is a perfectly viable option. If you later decide to buy a dedicated trigger, you can control both of them. The only drawback is that the controls on the flashes themselves are not as straight forward as they are on the Godox X2 or Xpro. Plus you will probably never use the speedlight ...


5

If you're trying to control a Yongnuo YN685 via radio using a Godox X2T transmitter, it won't work. They speak different "languages" that aren't compatible with one another. You can use a Godox X1R receiver attached to the hot foot of the YN685 flash to receive the signal from the Godox transmitter, or you can get a Yongnuo YN622 compatible ...


4

I think you will find that the RF603 is only certified to work with a flash trigger voltage of less than 12v. If you want to a trigger setup that will take a higher voltage then the Cactus is better. Drawback of Cactus is no TTL passthrough on the transmitter. A better option is the Comtrig T320 or G430, both of which can take high voltage flash units and ...


4

As of 2018, aside from the built-in RC "smart" optical system made by Olympus and Panasonic, there are a few radio triggering systems that now support TTL and HSS with MFT (micro four-thirds), as well as remote power control. There are also manual-only systems with radio triggers built-in that support remote power control from the MFT hotshoe. Full TTL/HSS ...


4

I could be wrong, but garage door openers work on RF and not IR and they have to be configured to work with your garage door (they won't work with any garage door out of the box). Similarly, while the IR beam may be the same, different cameras may respond to them differently or require different patterns to operate. I'm not too savvy on IR spec's, but I see ...


4

The following radio-based flash triggering systems can communicate TTL for Pentax: The Cactus X-TTL system with their V6II/IIs triggers can give you remote power control over TTL Pentax flashes, HSS sympathy triggering, and full TTL passthrough to an on-camera flash mounted on top of the trigger, as well as P-TTL with remote flashes. Phottix's Odin II ...


4

You can, using the sync port on the Yongnuo trigger. However, AlienBees use a 3.5mm mono sync, so you'll need a cord that can connect the two up. Fortunately, they exist and Paul Buff sells them. You can probably also find smaller cables, but you may want to consider the long ones anyways as they may let you do some funky strobe positioning, behind things ...


4

In addition to a radio trigger, you might consider an off camera shoe cord. They come in lengths from 1.5' to 10'. They are a very economical option for getting the flash off camera while still retaining TTL capability. This shot was taken using an off shoe cord in a dimly lit banquet hall. I hand held the flash with my left hand about 18-24" away from the ...


4

When you take a picture with a flash, the flash discharges from a bank of capacitors for a given time to regulate the flash power. The higher power the flash, the longer the flash is discharged for, and thus, the more power is used and the longer recharge takes. The most common solution for your problem is to alter the criteria so that you can take more ...


4

Yongnuo only makes two types of flashes with built-in radio triggers: manual-only flashes (YN-560III & YN-560IV), and the Canon-RT compatible flash, the YN-600EX-RT. The YN-565EX/568EX/500EX (and MkIIs) models do not have a radio receiver built in. (The YN-685 apparently has a YN-622/RF-603/RF-605 receiver in it). The built-in slave modes on the YN-...


4

Actually, the most problematic part of your equation here is the 380EX. It doesn't do Canon's wireless eTTL slave mode, which is probably why you're looking for triggers, but it has no manual power control setting capability, so even if you can get it to fire off-camera, you can't control the output and it can only fire at full power. And if you get TTL-...


4

The goal of all of them is to fire a flash that's not on the camera. Let's take a look at what all this means radio trigger (e.g. PocketWizard) They talk to each other via radio, which means there's no flash firing just for communication purposes. You will definitely need a sender unit on the camera, because no camera (as of yet) has built in sender. This ...


4

Most low-cost (say < US$50/set) flash radio triggers do not support eTTL or HSS. They are "manual-only" triggers. It the triggers/flash only have a single contact/pin they're definitely manual-only, because that big contact/pin in the center of the hotshoe "square" is the sync signal and that's the only signal that can physically be communicated. There ...


4

Does my flash actually have a wireless reciever in it (Instruction manual seems to point to "yes")? Yes. It has both an optical transmitter and an optical receiver. That means that it can be used both as an on-camera Master or an off-camera Slave using the Canon E-TTL optical communication system. If I use the flash on my hot shoe, does it "transmit" to ...


4

IR Systems Think of it this way. Digital cameras are generally made by companies that do other consumer electronics. So, the first wireless controls for off-camera flash that were built were based on existing IR* remote technology—like how your TV remotes work. This has an obvious advantage for manufacturers of not requiring radio bandwidth allocation in all ...


4

Of course it's possible. You have at least 3 solutions: An infrared transmitter: the camera and flash must be in sight, no obstacle between the two. Operation is bad in daylight. A radio transmitter. The most universal solution. the transmitter will might be used in other cases. In case of a long exposure, the solution proposed above is good: fire the flash ...


4

The only way you could trigger the Godox SK400 with your current setup would be to use it in "dumb" slave mode where the flash from the Yongnuo speedlight would trigger it. The radio in your Yongnuo trigger (regardless of which Yongnuo system you have - there are at least three separate Yongnuo radio protocols that are not compatible with each other: YN622,...


4

Provided that all you want a wireless solution to do is tell the flash when to fire, any transmitter/receiver set that are compatible with one another will be able to do that. The easiest way to insure this is to buy a set that includes both a transmitter and a receiver. This is based on the assumption that the flash, camera, and triggering system in ...


4

I've been using the YN622C-TX and YN622C transceivers for about the last four years. I think I have gone through maybe three or four sets of alkaline batteries in the TX. The transmitters and receivers don't use much energy at all. The transmitters are very low powered radios that only transmit a few milliseconds per exposure. The receivers are even more ...


4

The only way to use a 750D to trigger an off-camera YN-560 IV without adding any other hardware is to use the pop-up flash to trigger the YN-560 IV in "dumb" slave mode. The YN-560 IV has a built in radio receiver compatible with the YN560/RF605/RF603 communication protocol. Your camera has no built-in radio transmitter (none of Canon's current cameras do), ...


4

What you're missing is that Yongnuo has three different flash triggering systems: YN-560-TX and RF-60x manual-only triggering system. The YN-622/YN-622-TX TTL/HSS triggering system. The Yongnuo clones of the Canon "RT" triggering system. All three groups use different radio signalling communication protocols. Your flash and its built-in trigger is from ...


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