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One solution is a lens with a built-in light. The light doesn't need to be very powerful since it is very close to the subject.


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Closeup/macro buffs tend not to use ring flashes (which cause flat lighting) as much as elaborate hand-made snoot constructs. My personal insect hunter gets along with "old stock" components, namely a suitable flash reflector and a number of (achromat) closeup dioptres. You still may want to have some white cardboard to hold behind your subjects ...


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If you're so close your ring flash doesn't bear on your subject, you're pretty well limited to side-lighting the subject. One option might be a diffusion ring attached to the ring flash. A ring of LEDs, might also do the job, if central light on a near-flat surface facing the lens isn't critical. Depending on what kind of catch light is acceptable, you ...


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I have a Canon camera (90D) with an inbuilt flash; when I half press the shutter it fires the flash a bit to do metering I presume. Actually it might be that the AF-assist is going off to help the camera focus. If you have AF-assist set in the camera menus, that's probably what you're seeing. Also, red-eye reduction uses a preflash. The TTL (Through-The-...


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Internal flash considerations are quite similar to external flash (and indeed there are cameras advertised where the flash has died by capacitor), but the involved energies tend to be a whole lot lower, so the capacitors may not need to be as specialised as they are in an external flash of significant strength. However, powering up the camera and powering up ...


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No you cannot. Though both systems use the 2.4 GHz radio band, their communication protocols are completely incompatible with each other. In addition, while Godox does make X1R receivers for Canon, Nikon, and Sony, at this time, they do not make a four-thirds compatible receiver, so if you were to add a Godox receiver to the foot of the FL7600WR, you would ...


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You don't need to fire the flash, only power it on. The short-term energy storage in a flash is the flash capacitor. It has a very high energy density and very high discharge currents. That does not leave a whole lot of leeway for sacrificing performance for durability. The energy in a capacitor is stored in an electric field between two electrodes. The ...


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Flashes have large electrolytic capacitors (sort of a wet variety inside) which when triggered, discharge into the flash tube to power the bright flash. When sitting around turned off for months or years, those capacitors can dry out and fail, or lose capacity. Turning them on causes them to recharge to full voltage, and triggering it a time or two repeats ...


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No, it cannot. Godox uses their own wireless communication protocol which is not compatible with the Olympus flash. The only way around that is to use one of Godox receiver/transceiver units under said flash.


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I mount Godox AD200 on Bowens mount adapter (with a handle) and slide a 24"x24" Godox square softbox on the adapter. If you can manage to mount AD360ii on Bowens adapter, this solution might work. If my camera is on a tripod, I can hold the softbox where I want and trigger my camera remotely alternately an assistant can hold the softbox while I ...


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I like the old Regula Variant 740 flashes (from the 90s or earlier, using 4×AA batteries and working fine with 1.2V NiMH rechargeables). The 740-2MFD has a trigger voltage below 12V. The 740CTX I have measured with something like 180V or so, so unless you do a proper separation circuit, it's probably to be avoided. It has the typical "cobra head" ...


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The "Brightness" of a flash is characterized by its guide number. The higher the number the brighter. If you are looking at the usual camera-mounted "Cobra" flash, keep in mind that many have a mobile reflector to adjust the width of the beam, a narrower beam yielding a higher GN. The beam width is given in mm, and is the focal length of ...


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It depends on what you call "macro photography". Living subjects at this size move fast and you need to stop down a lot for sufficient depth of field. Here is an example shot I made today: You see that Depth of field is a real problem (this is the smallest aperture this camera with crop factor 1.67 has: F16). There is significant motion blur. This has ...


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