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33

Yongnuo doesn't really abide by a strict naming convention, but for the most part, here are the conventions I've discerned: 4xx—these are first-generation models. They have fewer features and tend to cost less. The only optical slaving they can do are the "dumb" modes (like SU-4) and cannot be used as wireless eTTL/CLS slaves, and do not do HSS. 5xx&...


11

Check that the diffusion panel is fully seated back into its slot. Like the Canon flashes the YN-568EXII is imitating, if the diffusion panel is pulled out, the flash sets itself to the widest zoom and ignores any attempts to set the zoom differently.


6

If they're TTL-capable flashes, they're brand specific. And they only come in Canon and Nikon flavors. The manual-only models are not brand-specific and will work on any ISO-compatible hotshoe. It's not a 100% reliable guide (e.g., the YN-500EX is an exception), but generally any model that ends in a 0 is manual-only and brand-agnostic; any model that ...


5

There is no hard limit to how many YN-560III flashes you can set off remotely with the appropriate transmitter device, as long as the flashes can receive the radio signal. Four is well within its capabilities. However, the YN-560III only has a built-in radio receiver. You still need a radio transmitter. The following Yongnuo models can all be used as a ...


5

This differs widely from one jurisdiction to another, but there are generally 2 levels of illegality" counterfeited goods (often criminal offense) goods violating patents/trademarks/general design etc (civil liability) First one happens when seller misinforms customer about the product, eg. you're buying something thinking it's Canon, but it's a fake. Here ...


5

There are several different types of intellectual property, which might apply here, but I don't see any indication that they do. As you say, the specifics may depend on jurisdiction, but a lot of this is effectively global. Let's start with what definitely doesn't apply: A. Copyright. This is a product, not a creative expression. There are some cases where ...


5

There are a large number of options available to you all over the price/reliability spectrum. You basically just want TTL-capable triggers for Canon. The difference between using them and using manual-only triggers like the V5s, is that you may be limited on what lights or other triggers play nice together, and integrating studio strobes might be more of a ...


5

Generally when it comes to manual-flashes-with-remote-power-control, only flashes and triggers in the same brand and triggering system will be compatible enough to allow you remote control over power and zoom. A built-in receiver in the flash has to match the radio system, and only a built-in receiver can remotely control power/zoom on a single-pin manual-...


5

The Yongnuo YN568EX II flashes have built in optical receivers that operate on Canons optical wireless system that uses very short pulses of light to communicate. You need an optical Master flash (such as another YN-568EX II) or Canon compatible wireless optical controller (such as the YN-ST-E2) on the camera to control them wirelessly without attaching ...


4

Yongnuo only makes two types of flashes with built-in radio triggers: manual-only flashes (YN-560III & YN-560IV), and the Canon-RT compatible flash, the YN-600EX-RT. The YN-565EX/568EX/500EX (and MkIIs) models do not have a radio receiver built in. (The YN-685 apparently has a YN-622/RF-603/RF-605 receiver in it). The built-in slave modes on the YN-...


4

Your camera's menu cannot recognize the flash, but it will still work. If you put the YN-560III on the flash hotshoe and push the shutter button, the flash will still fire in sync with your camera shutter. But you have to set/adjust the output power manually on the back of the flash. If it's not firing, check the batteries, and that the flash is seated ...


4

Sounds like you got a bad unit. I'd say return/exchange it. If it's not firing from the Pilot button when full charged with known good batteries, then it could be an issue with the capacitor or the flash tube, and that's pretty major. Yongnuo gear has a lot of happy customers, but if you go back through the history of their stuff, you'll find that copy ...


4

This is a known bug with Yongnuo flashes (notably the YN-685's predecessors, the YN-568EX and YN-568EX II). TTL tends to be inaccurate and will underexpose unless you switch the metering mode from Evaluative to Average (see: this DPReview discussion, where one person claims Yongnuo support themselves suggested switching to Average metering). This is, ...


4

The YN560-IV is a manual only flash. It does not do iTTL at all. It does have a radio receiver built in that allows you to control the flash's manual power and zoom head, as well as fire the flash, from the YN560-TX transmitter. You can also tell it to "fire" using an RF-603 N/RF-603 II N/RF-605 set to "transmitter" on the camera, but you can't set power ...


4

The only way you could trigger the Godox SK400 with your current setup would be to use it in "dumb" slave mode where the flash from the Yongnuo speedlight would trigger it. The radio in your Yongnuo trigger (regardless of which Yongnuo system you have - there are at least three separate Yongnuo radio protocols that are not compatible with each other: YN622,...


4

Even with a higher end and/or full frame camera you're probably still going to be shooting such events in the ISO 800-3200 range. It just comes with the territory. Current cameras perform very well in the ISO 800 to ISO 1600 range, even the crop sensor APS-C and smaller 4/3 format models. Some do well at ISO 3200 and beyond. Noise reduction in post ...


4

With a manual flash like this, there's no communication with the camera body, and the camera doesn't know that it's there. The hotshoe is just an open switch which the flash slots into; the switch is closed ("shorted", turned on) for an instant when you hit the shutter button. It's an old, pre-electronic standard. If you wanted automation, yes, you made a ...


4

They're compatible. Kind of. You can use them as manual only flashes with the Yongnuo YN560-TX and the receivers listed in the following paragraph. Or you can use them as full TTL flashes via the Nikon CLS/AWL optical wireless protocol. But the physical connections on the feet of the YN568EX II are not hardware compatible with the Nikon TTL system. You ...


4

I've been using the YN622C-TX and YN622C transceivers for about the last four years. I think I have gone through maybe three or four sets of alkaline batteries in the TX. The transmitters and receivers don't use much energy at all. The transmitters are very low powered radios that only transmit a few milliseconds per exposure. The receivers are even more ...


4

What you're missing is that Yongnuo has three different flash triggering systems: YN-560-TX and RF-60x manual-only triggering system. The YN-622/YN-622-TX TTL/HSS triggering system. The Yongnuo clones of the Canon "RT" triggering system. All three groups use different radio signalling communication protocols. Your flash and its built-in trigger is from ...


3

Optical slave flashes are somewhat finicky because most cameras with a builtin flash have one or more pre-flashes, for red-eye reduction as well as to help with focusing and exposure metering (e.g. Canon's E-TTL). A simple optical slave will trigger on those and then be unavailable for the main flash. There are two way to tackle this problem: Turn off the ...


3

The first question to ask yourself is what kind of triggering system do you plan to use? CLS All the Yongnuo flashes with "EX" in their name can be used as a CLS slave. Dumb optical (S1/S2/SU-4) If you want to use dumb optical triggering, then all the current Yongnuo flashes have S1 and S2 "dumb" optical slave modes in them. S1 fires on the first flash ...


3

The only difference between the two packages you're looking at is the shutter release cable that's included in the package--the radio triggers themselves are identical units. But since Nikon uses two different shutter release connectors depending on whether the camera is entry-level or prosumer, there are two separate shutter release cables, for when you ...


3

The YN560III has a built-in receiver, but it still needs a transmitter. You will need at least one RF602/603 transceiver to act as the transmitter. As for the number of flashes you can control, that would be literally as many as you can cram into the radio range of the transmitter. Your problem with the Neewer flash(es) and radio transmitter was probably ...


3

There's no way to use HSS between your 6D and 430EX or YN560III with those triggers. The triggers themselves are not capable of syncing at faster than 1/320 second for a single pulse. Some triggers that communicate with the camera via the hot shoe such as the Pocket Wizard MiniTT1 transmitter and FlexTT5 receiver are capable of HSS with Canon flashes, but ...


3

Normally you would choose the "Optical Remote" option on the camera's menu to do this, even though you're not actually going to be controlling the flashes optically directly from the camera. This is because the camera sees the YN-622C transmitter as a camera mounted external flash. According to the third party written "The Other YN622C Use Guide", the newer ...


3

Good news and... Not quite bad news. First, this is a modern flash with a low trigger voltage, and there is no risk using it on any modern camera. So, good news. Second: this will work with any generic radio trigger, from cheap to expensive. However, its headline feature is built-in radio triggering, and that works with Yongnou's own triggers, which they ...


3

If you have the YN565EX version for Nikon, the SL mode allows it to receive signals from a Nikon Master flash using the automated iTTL flash exposure system. S1 & S2 modes are for manually set flash levels. If you have the Canon version, SL mode similarly enables the YN565EX to work as a receiver with Canon's e-TTL automatic flash exposure system. Both ...


3

All three of the Yongnuo radio triggering systems are incompatible with each other. The "manual" Yongnuo triggers (RF-60x/YN-560-TX), the TTL Yongnuo triggers (N-622/YN-622-TX), and the RT Yongnuo triggers (YN-E3-RT/YNE3-RX) have differing communication protocols, despite all being 2.4 GHz radio triggers. The only way to get them to interoperate is to stack ...


3

If it's like my YN-568 (Mk I), adjust the tilt so the flash is "flat", then on the "bottom" side of the head, below the MADE IN CHINA plate, look in the groove right above the tilt joint. It's lightly etched, so it's easy to miss, and you're probably gonna need some side lighting to photograph it. If you rotate the head and look at the top of the body, you'...


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