74

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


29

Do I need a speedlight if I do not do people photography or portraits? Depends. But yes, speedlights can be used for more than portraiture. How else could one use speedlights? Other uses for flash include: High-speed photography. Flash bursts can be much faster than top shutter speeds on camera bodies; e.g., bullet strikes Macro photography. The thin ...


28

Buckle in for a long answer. There are three primary advantages that "studio" flash have over hotshoe flashes. The first, and most obvious is power; even the lower-powered "serious" units (we're not talking about AC-powered lightbulb-shaped slaves) tend to start at at least the equivalent of 2 "full-sized" speedlights (of the Nikon SB-910/Canon 600EX-RT/...


18

Yes the trigger voltage on some old flashes is too high for modern electronic cameras. There is a page on botzilla Photo Strobe Trigger Voltages which lists many old flash units. I don't see your dad's flash model there, but the 20 B3 model had a trigger voltage of 168 volts. According to this thread on photo.net, the 7D can handle up to 250V, so that ...


15

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that "...


15

The guide number represents the light output of the flash alone, with no ambient light factored in. Unless you are using slow sync flash, the ambient light is just assumed to have no meaningful impact. And, when you do want it to be a factor, the simple isolated number is much easier to actually use to figure out your light ratios. Why doesn't the ambient ...


12

Yes, the Wein Safesync is designed to do exactly that: http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm


11

"Speedlight" is Nikon's brandname, and "Speedlite" is Canon's — but apparently Ricoh also used the name "Speedlite". That made me curious, and in a quick trademark search, it appears that no company has ever registered these terms, although an "American Speedlight Corporation" registered a letter-A-with-sunburst logo for their product ("Flash apparatus in ...


10

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around the ...


10

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


8

If you're setting up the lights, and they're a fixed distance away from your subject, then use manual. Other than if you fire your flashes with insufficient power, your exposure will be consistent from frame to frame. That's the boring example. Nothing is moving. TTL doesn't gain anything over manual. If the distance isn't fixed, then it's still ...


8

Like any lighting, this is not a simple one-size-fits-all type of deal. You have to think it through. Light should very much feel organic in the image and should have a reason for being there (i.e., "motivated light"). Nothing is more jarring than a light source in an image that your brain tells you just shouldn't be there. So think what light sources in ...


8

My bet is on the same thing you guess — light reflected from the diffuser bouncing around badly. This is especially likely if you've tipped the flash to point the diffuser dome forward, as I've seen some people do. The EF 85mm f/1.2L is not a physically long lens and even with a hood you might have the light source protruding way too far forward. This is ...


7

Yes, you can use either brand on the other one's hotshoe, and the flash will fire in sync with the exposure being made. But that's the only function you will have. No i-TTL/e-TTL, no high-speed sync (FP), no menu commanding of the flash, no flash exposure compensation, no wake-up from sleep, no 2nd curtain with a Nikon flash on a Canon camera, no matching ...


7

As with anything you buy used, wear and tear can be a drawback. Flash heads and key electronics do have a limited life, though I can't recall having a flash 'bulb' die on me, usually some other, unknown issue takes their life before then. For the record, I purchased a used 420EX that was used as a rental unit by my local store. So I assumed going in it had ...


7

Don't forget that you can also set the parameters for using flash in Av mode on Canon 5D Mk II cameras, with respect to shutter speed. In the 'Custom Function' Menu, > 'Exposure' (C.Fn I), > 'Flash Sync, In Av Mode. You have 3 options: 1. Auto 2. 1/60 to 1/200 3. 1/200 fixed I think that Auto is the default setting, the only problem with this is your ...


7

The traditional flash head zoom steps really mean "covers the field of view of a full-frame lens at this focal length". That's because flashes don't really have focal length of their own — they just have a reflector which can move to deliver a wider or narrower beam, and for convenience, the angle of that beam is specified by the lens focal length that it's ...


7

If it were the 380EX that was having issues triggering the strobes: The most likely scenario would be that the pre-flash of the E-TTL only 380EX is triggering the strobes before the shutter opens. The 380EX is an automatic-only flash. It has no manual control. The E-TTL system fires a metering pre-flash and measures the light reflected back to the camera to ...


7

You are correct to observe that the reduced power is the key to your flash's ability to freeze motion. More flashes may work (see caveat below) but since more gear usually costs more money, here are some alternatives Slow the Event If you are recording water droplets, record them right after they form. It takes a few feet for the drop to "speed up." If you ...


6

With manual flash, you have two separate exposures you'll have to set and balance - background exposure and subject exposure (illuminated by flash). Both are affected by aperture and ISO, while only background exposure is affected by shutter speed and only subject exposure is affected by flash power setting. First, you'll set your aperture, ISO and shutter ...


6

Your test button should firing at whatever power you select manually. I can't speak to that specific model, but it has on a few different flash brands I've tried. Its pretty easy to tell if it does. Just set it to high, take a picture and press the test button. Set it to low, take a picture and press the test button. Is there a big difference? ...


6

Unfortunately, no. As of today (October 17th, 2012), built-in radio-controlled wireless flash setup with Canon 600EX-RT speedlites limits you just to two options: 600EX-RT master with 600EX-RT slaves ST-E3-RT master with 600EX-RT slaves Optical wireless mode, on the other hand, allows 600EX-RT master to trigger non-600EX-RT slaves, but that's not what you ...


6

Bouncing gives the most diffuse light given an appropriate surface and usually produces excellent results. It's better to aim above and slightly behind you, if you light the ceiling directly above your subject you can get uneven lighting of the face, particularly eye sockets. Bouncing off walls can work well but tends to be less predictable and even, as ...


6

The sync voltage limit on a Cactus V5 is 300V. As long as your flash doesn't go over that, you should be fine. In addition, any dRebels that are newer than the 300D have a sync volt limit of 250V on the hotshoe, according to Chuck Westfall, the technical rep for Canon, answering a question in a 2007 tech tips article for the digitaljournalist.org: I ...


6

To cut a long story short, you are using too fast a shutter speed. The shutter consists of two black 'curtains' that travel down over the sensor, one after the other, allowing exposure of the shot. Both these curtains have to be out of the way when the flash fires, otherwise they will block part of the sensor and you get a black bar in your shot. Using a ...


6

For a Canon flash to be compatible with the hot shoe of EOS digital cameras, it needs to have a model number that includes EX. The EZ series of flashes made in the early 1990s are not compatible with Canon digital cameras. Some of the EZ series were auto only and have no way to be adjusted manually. Those won't even fire "dumb" when attached to the hot shoe ...


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