76

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


29

Do I need a speedlight if I do not do people photography or portraits? Depends. But yes, speedlights can be used for more than portraiture. How else could one use speedlights? Other uses for flash include: High-speed photography. Flash bursts can be much faster than top shutter speeds on camera bodies; e.g., bullet strikes Macro photography. The thin ...


28

Buckle in for a long answer. There are three primary advantages that "studio" flash have over hotshoe flashes. The first, and most obvious is power; even the lower-powered "serious" units (we're not talking about AC-powered lightbulb-shaped slaves) tend to start at at least the equivalent of 2 "full-sized" speedlights (of the Nikon SB-910/Canon 600EX-RT/...


21

Does it make sense to buy [a] Speedlight? Absolutely if what you want to learn and achieve is good on-camera bounce flash. That is exactly what a speedlight with a head that tilts and swivels is designed to do that a pop-up flash cannot. However, very few of us would think a pop-up flash is "too strong". It's likely that you still need to learn ...


15

The trigger voltage you are worrying about doesn't come from the camera; it's all in the flash. All the camera does, in effect, is "flip a switch"; it shorts out the centre pin of the flash and the contacts at the side of the flash's foot. The voltage problem comes from the kind of "switch" used to short out those contacts. In (most) modern cameras, that "...


15

The guide number represents the light output of the flash alone, with no ambient light factored in. Unless you are using slow sync flash, the ambient light is just assumed to have no meaningful impact. And, when you do want it to be a factor, the simple isolated number is much easier to actually use to figure out your light ratios. Why doesn't the ambient ...


11

Yes, the Wein Safesync is designed to do exactly that: http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm


11

"Speedlight" is Nikon's brandname, and "Speedlite" is Canon's — but apparently Ricoh also used the name "Speedlite". That made me curious, and in a quick trademark search, it appears that no company has ever registered these terms, although an "American Speedlight Corporation" registered a letter-A-with-sunburst logo for their product ("Flash apparatus in ...


10

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


9

Yes, you can use either brand on the other one's hotshoe, and the flash will fire in sync with the exposure being made. But that's the only function you will have. No i-TTL/e-TTL, no high-speed sync (FP), no menu commanding of the flash, no flash exposure compensation, no wake-up from sleep, no 2nd curtain with a Nikon flash on a Canon camera, no matching ...


8

Like any lighting, this is not a simple one-size-fits-all type of deal. You have to think it through. Light should very much feel organic in the image and should have a reason for being there (i.e., "motivated light"). Nothing is more jarring than a light source in an image that your brain tells you just shouldn't be there. So think what light sources in ...


8

My bet is on the same thing you guess — light reflected from the diffuser bouncing around badly. This is especially likely if you've tipped the flash to point the diffuser dome forward, as I've seen some people do. The EF 85mm f/1.2L is not a physically long lens and even with a hood you might have the light source protruding way too far forward. This is ...


8

Canon Canon's own EX speedlights should all be compatible, if not fully compatible. The official word from Canon on their brochures and websites for the bodies without the sync contact is: Speedlites other than the EX-series or non-Canon flash units cannot be used. Not all functions of the Canon EX-series flashes are supported. Godox In April/May 2019, ...


7

If it were the 380EX that was having issues triggering the strobes: The most likely scenario would be that the pre-flash of the E-TTL only 380EX is triggering the strobes before the shutter opens. The 380EX is an automatic-only flash. It has no manual control. The E-TTL system fires a metering pre-flash and measures the light reflected back to the camera to ...


7

You are correct to observe that the reduced power is the key to your flash's ability to freeze motion. More flashes may work (see caveat below) but since more gear usually costs more money, here are some alternatives Slow the Event If you are recording water droplets, record them right after they form. It takes a few feet for the drop to "speed up." If you ...


6

The sync voltage limit on a Cactus V5 is 300V. As long as your flash doesn't go over that, you should be fine. In addition, any dRebels that are newer than the 300D have a sync volt limit of 250V on the hotshoe, according to Chuck Westfall, the technical rep for Canon, answering a question in a 2007 tech tips article for the digitaljournalist.org: I ...


6

To cut a long story short, you are using too fast a shutter speed. The shutter consists of two black 'curtains' that travel down over the sensor, one after the other, allowing exposure of the shot. Both these curtains have to be out of the way when the flash fires, otherwise they will block part of the sensor and you get a black bar in your shot. Using a ...


6

For a Canon flash to be compatible with the hot shoe of EOS digital cameras, it needs to have a model number that includes EX. The EZ series of flashes made in the early 1990s are not compatible with Canon digital cameras. Some of the EZ series were auto only and have no way to be adjusted manually. Those won't even fire "dumb" when attached to the hot shoe ...


6

Yes, the hot shoe is the same across all EOS bodies - and if all you care about is manual control (no eTTL, HSS and the like) it's actually standard across the industry, with the only notable exceptions being some Sony bodies and the Nikon 1 system which use a proprietary hot shoe.


6

It's called the foot — the thing that goes into a shoe. You can find this in [ISO 518:2006], the standard which describes the... standard... hot shoe. It's not, however, defined there — it's just basically used as if everyone knows what it means. (Which, I guess, we do.) The dimensions given in Figures 1 and 2 are basic for the solid shoe. When an ...


6

Yes. Speedlights reduce the light output by turning the "power" off earlier. This way the time the flash is on is reduced, which results in shorter flash duration for lower power flashes. Adding another flash will keep the flash duration the same but double the overall output. You might as well increase ISO.


6

Photography is always about light! When you are shooting in a very dark place, you must provide the light. You must consider not only the amount of light you need, but the shape and direction of the light you need to get the results you desire. Although camera based flashes will allow you to take a photograph in the dark, the results will generally look ...


5

If you want to use the built-in Canon RT radio system, then you need a unit that speaks the Canon RT radio protocol. The only gear, aside from Canon's ST-E3-RT, 600EX II-RT, 600EX-RT, and 430EX III-RT that does so, are clone units from Yongnuo, Shanny, Phottix, and studio strobes and a speedlight from Jinbei/Orlit. Yongnuo have clones of the 600EX-RT and ...


5

I have had identical issues with the 580 ex II. Change the flash setting in the cameras menu to 'average' not evaluative it fixes it. I don't use evaluative for the camera settings without the flash either the same issue happens and photos under exposed. I think Canon need to revisit their 'evaluative' system. Hope this helps....


5

They're red LEDs under the cover. I removed the cover from my 430 EX and whilst it works better (with all lenses, on account of producing a brighter, sharper grid pattern) the light is still red. Here's what it looks like without the cover: It's worth noting that you can in theory remove and replace the cover as necessary but I snapped one off the clips ...


5

It depends. The Canon flashes you listed in your question use pulsed light from the Master unit to tell the Slave units when to fire and how much power to emit. This allows proprietary communication between the Master and Slave units and allows for use of Canon's E-TTL automatic exposure system as well as permits the photographer to set manual power levels ...


5

The 430EXII supports Canon's now older method of remote flash triggering, which uses flash pulses from the commanding unit to trigger the remote unit (430EX in this case). The newer system, based on radio, is supported by the 600EX-RT, and ST-E3-RT units. Your system uses flash pulses, which fire BEFORE the shutter opens. So, even though you are seeing the ...


5

There is no hard limit to how many YN-560III flashes you can set off remotely with the appropriate transmitter device, as long as the flashes can receive the radio signal. Four is well within its capabilities. However, the YN-560III only has a built-in radio receiver. You still need a radio transmitter. The following Yongnuo models can all be used as a ...


5

I can confirm that if you use a Yongnuo YN-622C, you will be able to trigger your canon speedlights. The setup that I have is 1 Profoto TTL Air remote, 2 Yongnuo YN-622C, 1 430EX II flash, 1 B1. One of the Yongnuo goes between the camera and the Profoto Air remote. The other on the speedlight.


5

I'm sure there will be very comprehensive answers to this well-structured question, this one is just from the perspective of someone who doesn't own anything more powerful than a speedlight. Besides the ability to pop flashes brighter/farther/faster/longer (nothing I need for my modest purposes), what seems like a game-changer to me is the point where a ...


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