11

Flash duration is typically much shorter than most cameras' flash sync speed. If the flash only has a duration of, say, 1/1000 second (or 1 millisecond), it matters not if the shutter is open 1/250 second (4 milliseconds) or 1/25 second (40 milliseconds), the energy from the flash that is captured by the photo will be the same in either case. What shutter ...


10

"Magic" automatic flashes, whether TTL or using a built-in sensor, are relatively recent. Before that, a handy system was developed for getting correct flash exposure manually. This is the guide number system, which is used for calculating the right mix of lens aperture, subject distance, and flash power. The guide number itself is given in terms of ...


8

Yes, you can use either brand on the other one's hotshoe, and the flash will fire in sync with the exposure being made. But that's the only function you will have. No i-TTL/e-TTL, no high-speed sync (FP), no menu commanding of the flash, no flash exposure compensation, no wake-up from sleep, no 2nd curtain with a Nikon flash on a Canon camera, no matching ...


8

If you're setting up the lights, and they're a fixed distance away from your subject, then use manual. Other than if you fire your flashes with insufficient power, your exposure will be consistent from frame to frame. That's the boring example. Nothing is moving. TTL doesn't gain anything over manual. If the distance isn't fixed, then it's still ...


7

The question was how to meter, not how to eyeball the histogram or guesstimate from guide numbers. I mean no offense to those who answered this way. Just that the original question had specifically to do with metering. As far as I know, the most reliable way to meter a flash is to trigger it from an incident flash meter. You can then know exactly how much ...


6

The problem that is solved via high speed sync has nothing to do with the power of the flash and everything to do with the curtain transit time of the camera. Above a camera's sync speed the second curtain begins to close before the first curtain is completely open. Therefore very precisely timed multiple flashes must be emitted from the flash as the open ...


5

In general, no, not only do you not need it, but it won't help at all. In order to provide any meaningful amount of light more than a few feet away, you need a very, very powerful flash — much more than you can get in anything battery powered. Unless you are right on the field — less than ten feet away from your subject — even an expensive hotshoe flash ...


5

The simple equation assumes that the flash is effectively the only source of light in your image. This is a reasonable assumption in many cases, because since exposure works on an exponential scale, the amount of light from typical indoor room lighting is a drop in a bucket compared to that provided by the flash. See Do flash guide numbers assume some ...


4

The guide number is inversely proportional to the power squared. This is due to the way that light intensity diminishes with distance, at twice the distance light is spread over four times the area, so each bit of that area receives 1/4 of the light. So the actual formula needs to take into account the square root of the power level: Guide Number = ...


4

There are many flashes across many brand lines that exhibit what you have discovered concerning your 430EX II. Although I don't think there is a great conspiracy amongst the flash manufacturers, the "Truth" is that the manual minimum setting is actually the minimum manual setting. In other words, many flashes that can be controlled both manually and via TTL ...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


4

I have four manual flashes. I love them. I just make a test shot and look at the histogram on the back of my camera: adjust to suit. Works great. Check out the Strobist, he loves manual flashes.


4

If you're using guide numbers to calculate, then bouncing is going to increase the distance by 50-100%, and less of the light is going to reach your subject as it's scattered by the ceiling. So if the guide number is 80, I'd start by cutting it in half to 40. So at 10 feet that's f/4 (40 divided by 10 at base ISO). But as you're likely using it as fill, ...


4

Godox has several lines of flashes (everything from speed lights to studio strobes) that are manual with HSS. The challenge is HSS requires the trigger interface with the cameras proprietary flash protocols and so if you're doing all that you might as well do TTL. Godox gets around this by making HSS an off-camera only function. So the flash has a single ...


4

Good afternoon, I have tried every setting on my Sony DSC-H400 to stop the flash reflecting back off the glass of my subject. I'm new at this! I have read through all my books. I originally assumed you were referring to subjects in glass protected display cases, and that's what the second part of my answer refers to. The 1st part below refers to taking ...


4

Provided that all you want a wireless solution to do is tell the flash when to fire, any transmitter/receiver set that are compatible with one another will be able to do that. The easiest way to insure this is to buy a set that includes both a transmitter and a receiver. This is based on the assumption that the flash, camera, and triggering system in ...


4

You are correct, rear curtain sync is a very old technique that long predates modern flashes and will not be hampered just because you're using a manual flash. That being said, though most are, not ALL manual flashes are well suited for performing a rear curtain sync. Because the camera fires the strobes just before it closes the curtain, the electronic lag ...


3

With TTL you can get a decent picture in places and situations where it is hard or impossible to setup your lights. For example, you can shoot a very decent quick & dirty portrait by holding your flash on your left hand as far left as possible and shooting with your right hand. In a situation like this it would be difficult to mess with the manual ...


3

With manual flash and camera in manual mode, I think you already hit on one method of "metering" ... trial and error. Take a picture, chimp, adjust. Repeat until lighting is what you want. The other way is to use a handheld light meter.


3

Flash exposure compensation (FEC) shifts the metered exposure value for the flash by the set number of stops. The power levels of the flash in manual mode are fractions of full output (1/1). So if the TTL metering determines a flash power level of eg. half full strength (1/2) and you have dialed in a FEC of -1, the resulting flash output is 1/4, -2 would ...


3

Yes. :) Both are controls of the flash power, but FEC is relative (and only in TTL mode), while the power ratios are absolute (and only in M mode). FEC, like exposure compensation, is a relative adjustment from where the auto exposure system in the camera thinks the best exposure level is (i.e., it's relative to a shifting "0" on the scale, based upon ...


3

The main difference between the two transmitters it that they're used for different radio triggering systems. The YN-560-TX is for Yongnuo's manual-only 560/60x system; the YN-E3-RT is for Yongnuo's cloning of the Canon -RT radio triggering system built into Canon's latest speedlites. My understanding is that ... the YN-E3-RT won't work by itself, as ...


2

If you're purchasing a new manual hotshoe flash that you will, presumably, be using off-camera Strobist-style, I'd look at and for the following features: Power The guide number is (sometimes) a good guide for this, but make sure you know the ISO setting and zoom settings that were used to measure the guide number. For some third party units (e.g., Yongnuo)...


2

Manual mode: the flash fires at its full power. You control the amount of exposure on your film by setting the f-stop on your camera. The chart helps you to determine the f-stop to use. The shutter speed is irrelevant to the flash exposure that the film will sense, but ambient (non-flash light) will still expose the film. So, for example, if you are ...


2

Yes, this is very annoying. The lowest power settable when in manual mode is far higher than that which the flash can achieve in ETTL. I've done some tests and the manual flash when set to 1/64 exposes around 4 stops higher than the flash can actually achieve. Really limits the use of the flash in manual mode.


2

My simple rule for flash use is the combination of f8,GN,ISO at 10ft(3m) and I'll work any power or distance adjustment based on that initial setting. Having said that, for fill use, obviously I have to find a good combination of shutter speed+f8+ISO for ambient without my shutter going above the flash sync speed. Normally, half the maximum sync speed. If ...


2

Short answer: One isn't related to the other. Long answer: Electronic flash has a characteristic discharge curve (which you can see here). Modern flash designs 'cut off' the discharge curve at the appropriate time to deliver anything less than their full output. Note that because the intensity of the burst of light the flash delivers is not uniform ...


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