11

Flash duration is typically much shorter than most cameras' flash sync speed. If the flash only has a duration of, say, 1/1000 second (or 1 millisecond), it matters not if the shutter is open 1/250 second (4 milliseconds) or 1/25 second (40 milliseconds), the energy from the flash that is captured by the photo will be the same in either case. What shutter ...


9

Yes, you can use either brand on the other one's hotshoe, and the flash will fire in sync with the exposure being made. But that's the only function you will have. No i-TTL/e-TTL, no high-speed sync (FP), no menu commanding of the flash, no flash exposure compensation, no wake-up from sleep, no 2nd curtain with a Nikon flash on a Canon camera, no matching ...


6

The problem that is solved via high speed sync has nothing to do with the power of the flash and everything to do with the curtain transit time of the camera. Above a camera's sync speed the second curtain begins to close before the first curtain is completely open. Therefore very precisely timed multiple flashes must be emitted from the flash as the open ...


5

In general, no, not only do you not need it, but it won't help at all. In order to provide any meaningful amount of light more than a few feet away, you need a very, very powerful flash — much more than you can get in anything battery powered. Unless you are right on the field — less than ten feet away from your subject — even an expensive hotshoe flash ...


5

The simple equation assumes that the flash is effectively the only source of light in your image. This is a reasonable assumption in many cases, because since exposure works on an exponential scale, the amount of light from typical indoor room lighting is a drop in a bucket compared to that provided by the flash. See Do flash guide numbers assume some ...


4

There are many flashes across many brand lines that exhibit what you have discovered concerning your 430EX II. Although I don't think there is a great conspiracy amongst the flash manufacturers, the "Truth" is that the manual minimum setting is actually the minimum manual setting. In other words, many flashes that can be controlled both manually and via TTL ...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


4

Godox has several lines of flashes (everything from speed lights to studio strobes) that are manual with HSS. The challenge is HSS requires the trigger interface with the cameras proprietary flash protocols and so if you're doing all that you might as well do TTL. Godox gets around this by making HSS an off-camera only function. So the flash has a single ...


4

Provided that all you want a wireless solution to do is tell the flash when to fire, any transmitter/receiver set that are compatible with one another will be able to do that. The easiest way to insure this is to buy a set that includes both a transmitter and a receiver. This is based on the assumption that the flash, camera, and triggering system in ...


4

Good afternoon, I have tried every setting on my Sony DSC-H400 to stop the flash reflecting back off the glass of my subject. I'm new at this! I have read through all my books. I originally assumed you were referring to subjects in glass protected display cases, and that's what the second part of my answer refers to. The 1st part below refers to taking ...


4

You are correct, rear curtain sync is a very old technique that long predates modern flashes and will not be hampered just because you're using a manual flash. That being said, though most are, not ALL manual flashes are well suited for performing a rear curtain sync. Because the camera fires the strobes just before it closes the curtain, the electronic lag ...


3

Yes. :) Both are controls of the flash power, but FEC is relative (and only in TTL mode), while the power ratios are absolute (and only in M mode). FEC, like exposure compensation, is a relative adjustment from where the auto exposure system in the camera thinks the best exposure level is (i.e., it's relative to a shifting "0" on the scale, based upon ...


3

Flash exposure compensation (FEC) shifts the metered exposure value for the flash by the set number of stops. The power levels of the flash in manual mode are fractions of full output (1/1). So if the TTL metering determines a flash power level of eg. half full strength (1/2) and you have dialed in a FEC of -1, the resulting flash output is 1/4, -2 would ...


3

With manual flash and camera in manual mode, I think you already hit on one method of "metering" ... trial and error. Take a picture, chimp, adjust. Repeat until lighting is what you want. The other way is to use a handheld light meter.


3

The main difference between the two transmitters it that they're used for different radio triggering systems. The YN-560-TX is for Yongnuo's manual-only 560/60x system; the YN-E3-RT is for Yongnuo's cloning of the Canon -RT radio triggering system built into Canon's latest speedlites. My understanding is that ... the YN-E3-RT won't work by itself, as ...


2

My simple rule for flash use is the combination of f8,GN,ISO at 10ft(3m) and I'll work any power or distance adjustment based on that initial setting. Having said that, for fill use, obviously I have to find a good combination of shutter speed+f8+ISO for ambient without my shutter going above the flash sync speed. Normally, half the maximum sync speed. If ...


2

If you're purchasing a new manual hotshoe flash that you will, presumably, be using off-camera Strobist-style, I'd look at and for the following features: Power The guide number is (sometimes) a good guide for this, but make sure you know the ISO setting and zoom settings that were used to measure the guide number. For some third party units (e.g., Yongnuo), ...


2

Manual mode: the flash fires at its full power. You control the amount of exposure on your film by setting the f-stop on your camera. The chart helps you to determine the f-stop to use. The shutter speed is irrelevant to the flash exposure that the film will sense, but ambient (non-flash light) will still expose the film. So, for example, if you are ...


2

Triggers like the Pocket Wizards allow you you to interact wirelessly with your flash as if it were hard wired to the hot shoe of your camera. Of course the top Pocket Wizard systems cost considerably more than flashes like the LumiPro LP180. Non-TTL wireless radio triggers generally only communicate in one direction that allow the flash(es) to know when the ...


2

Short answer: One isn't related to the other. Long answer: Electronic flash has a characteristic discharge curve (which you can see here). Modern flash designs 'cut off' the discharge curve at the appropriate time to deliver anything less than their full output. Note that because the intensity of the burst of light the flash delivers is not uniform ...


2

After some experimentation with my own K1000, I'm confident that it does not use the battery for the flash. The camera's manual doesn't outright say this, but it does only mention the light meter when it talks about the battery. Wikipedia agrees. The evidence that convinced me, though, was reading up on the X sync method, realizing that it is just a ...


2

It is not so much the size of the soft box as it is the angle from the head of the flash to the edges of the material on the front of the soft box. Think of the flash head like it was a lens. The angle created by drawing lines from the center of the flash head to opposite corners of the soft box would be the same as a lens with that angle of view. Extend ...


2

I don't know why, but it appears that Pentax can only do HSS while in P-TTL mode. Canon and Nikon do allow HSS in manual mode.


2

RF-603 triggering To use these two flashes off camera with RF-603 triggers, you need three RF-603 units: one to act as the on-camera transmitter, and two to act as receivers on the feet of the flash units. You do need to understand that the RF-603 triggers are manual-only, and that you will not be able to use iTTL, or FP/HSS, that your remote flashes have ...


2

What is the difference between the YN560Tx and the YN-E3-RT? Here are a few of the distinguishing factors for the YN560-TX: The YN560-TX is manual only. It is made to control manual flashes (e.g. YN-560 IV) or some compatible TTL flashes (e.g. YN685 set to 'RF603 receive') set to manual power. The YN560-TX uses a communication protocol shared by the RF-602/...


2

Am I wrong with that impression? Yes, you are very wrong. Modern flash units are not “weak”, and they are not “becoming useless”. Today’s external flash unit have lots of power and are loaded with great features, but like anything, there is a learning curve. Your rambling, non-sensical question seems to imply you don’t really understand how to use an ...


2

You can get plastic cases in many types of sizes and quality, from cheap food storage tubs to more rugged pelican cases. I would go with a Pelican Case, and add some Pick and Pluck foam to it. They come in dozens of sizes. I bought a big one for all of my photo gear for my trip down the Colorado river in the grand canyon. There are some small Pelican cases ...


2

I ended up ordering 1" nylon tube with a 7/8" ID on McMaster-Carr along with vinyl end caps. Cut some discs from some left over closed cell foam. This lets me stack them vertically in the tube with padding in between and capping the ends. Very lightweight and fits in my bag easily. 7/8" is big enough for all the M-series bulbs I have. Part ...


1

Could anyone confirm that this method is ok and there is no significant delay between the first and second flash firing? Yes. If you have one of the flashes in S1 or S2 "dumb" optical slave mode, and fire the other flash on-camera, the two flashes will fire in sync. The thing you have to be careful of is that but the mode of the master flash on-camera has ...


1

What you're trying to avoid is any light from the flash reflecting off the glass and into your camera. It's an angles game. But because you're using a bridge camera's pop-up flash that is fixed in position just above your lens, it's going to be very difficult to get all the light to reflect off of glass (or glasses) at an angle the camera can't see. In ...


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