27

The Godox RT-04 are radio frequency (RF) based transmitters/receivers. It is unlikely that your friend triggered your studio strobes over RF unless he used a similar transmitter and the same channel setting. However many studio strobes have a photo cell, which lets them spot a nearby flash. The studio strobe will then fire to synchronize to that particular ...


16

The reason you were triggering the other flashes is that the other photographer is a rookie. She was probably using the flashes as optical slaves... bad decision. Even if she was using a radio signal she could easily set up a different radio frequency. It is a rookie mistake leaving the flashes as the frequency 1. Because most likely other nonprofessional ...


10

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


7

It's because of your shooting mode. You will need to be in P, Tv, Av, M or A-DEP modes. Source: http://learn.usa.canon.com/app/pdfs/quickguides/CDLC_EOS-Integrated-Speedlite-Transmitter_QuickGuide.pdf


7

If it were the 380EX that was having issues triggering the strobes: The most likely scenario would be that the pre-flash of the E-TTL only 380EX is triggering the strobes before the shutter opens. The 380EX is an automatic-only flash. It has no manual control. The E-TTL system fires a metering pre-flash and measures the light reflected back to the camera to ...


7

Yes, there are several systems that work in the way you describe, where the off-camera lights can switch between different TTL systems, and the only thing you need is an on-camera transmitter unit that matches the camera system (i.e., "speaks" the correct electronic flash protocol, and has a physical foot pin configuration that matches the contact ...


6

Generally when it comes to manual-flashes-with-remote-power-control, only flashes and triggers in the same brand and triggering system will be compatible enough to allow you remote control over power and zoom. A built-in receiver in the flash has to match the radio system, and only a built-in receiver can remotely control power/zoom on a single-pin manual-...


5

Yes and no. So far (Sept 2014), no Canon bodies can trigger the Wireless 600EX-RT flash via RADIO. However, a 70D can trigger it via OPTICAL (ie flash pulses) method, same as a 580EX/430EX etc. So, you must attach a radio transmitter, either a ST-E3-RT or another 600EX-RT, to the 70D in order to trigger the 600EX-RT via RADIO signal. While this ...


5

There is no hard limit to how many YN-560III flashes you can set off remotely with the appropriate transmitter device, as long as the flashes can receive the radio signal. Four is well within its capabilities. However, the YN-560III only has a built-in radio receiver. You still need a radio transmitter. The following Yongnuo models can all be used as a ...


5

Yes, there is the possibility that vintage strobes with high trigger voltages can damage wireless receivers/transceivers attached to them. The danger would only apply to the receiver/transceiver physically connected to the flash via either hot shoe connection or PC cord. There is no danger to the transmitter and camera connected to the receiver via wireless ...


5

The Yongnuo YN568EX II flashes have built in optical receivers that operate on Canons optical wireless system that uses very short pulses of light to communicate. You need an optical Master flash (such as another YN-568EX II) or Canon compatible wireless optical controller (such as the YN-ST-E2) on the camera to control them wirelessly without attaching ...


4

If you want to use i-TTL, the safest options it to go with Nikon. The cheapest Nikon flash available new would be the Nikon SB-700, or the Nikon SB-600 if you can find it used. However, if you don't need i-TTL, you can get away with any cheap flash. For example I have a pair of YN-460 speedlights, dirt cheap compared to the Nikon flashes but can still be ...


4

As of 2018, aside from the built-in RC "smart" optical system made by Olympus and Panasonic, there are a few radio triggering systems that now support TTL and HSS with MFT (micro four-thirds), as well as remote power control. There are also manual-only systems with radio triggers built-in that support remote power control from the MFT hotshoe. Full TTL/HSS ...


4

In Nikon speedlight terminology, the feature you want is SU-4 mode. The SB-600 does not have it, the SB-700, -800, -900, and 910 do. There are similar "dumb" slave modes in the SB-26 and SB-28DX. The terminology is confusing, because of the two separate types of optical slave modes: "dumb" for see-flash-fire-flash tripping, or "smart" CLS full-TTL-bells'n'...


4

This is a known problem with Pentax's wireless flash system. Or rather, it's a common problem with all such systems. (See similar complaint with Nikon.) Even though the manual states otherwise, at least portion of the control flash fires during the actual exposure, and you can see it in the image, particularly if there are reflective surfaces or if your ...


4

Just FYI, Strobist refers to David Hobby's Strobist blog, where most of us learned how to do off-camera flash. If you really want to use this flash off-camera, consider that optical slaving to your 650D's pop-up flash has some limitations. They may not come into play with food photography, but if you end up shooting outdoors on location in bright sunlight, ...


4

Yongnuo only makes two types of flashes with built-in radio triggers: manual-only flashes (YN-560III & YN-560IV), and the Canon-RT compatible flash, the YN-600EX-RT. The YN-565EX/568EX/500EX (and MkIIs) models do not have a radio receiver built in. (The YN-685 apparently has a YN-622/RF-603/RF-605 receiver in it). The built-in slave modes on the YN-...


4

Actually, the most problematic part of your equation here is the 380EX. It doesn't do Canon's wireless eTTL slave mode, which is probably why you're looking for triggers, but it has no manual power control setting capability, so even if you can get it to fire off-camera, you can't control the output and it can only fire at full power. And if you get TTL-...


4

Does my flash actually have a wireless reciever in it (Instruction manual seems to point to "yes")? Yes. It has both an optical transmitter and an optical receiver. That means that it can be used both as an on-camera Master or an off-camera Slave using the Canon E-TTL optical communication system. If I use the flash on my hot shoe, does it "transmit" to ...


4

IR Systems Think of it this way. Digital cameras are generally made by companies that do other consumer electronics. So, the first wireless controls for off-camera flash that were built were based on existing IR* remote technology—like how your TV remotes work. This has an obvious advantage for manufacturers of not requiring radio bandwidth allocation ...


4

Of course it's possible. You have at least 3 solutions: An infrared transmitter: the camera and flash must be in sight, no obstacle between the two. Operation is bad in daylight. A radio transmitter. The most universal solution. the transmitter will might be used in other cases. In case of a long exposure, the solution proposed above is good: fire the flash ...


4

Provided that all you want a wireless solution to do is tell the flash when to fire, any transmitter/receiver set that are compatible with one another will be able to do that. The easiest way to insure this is to buy a set that includes both a transmitter and a receiver. This is based on the assumption that the flash, camera, and triggering system in ...


4

There may be others, but at least the Godox X (Flashpoint R2) system functions in this way. You have to have the correct trigger for your camera (e.g. the XPro-N for Nikon or XPro-C for Canon), but you will get TTL regardless of the strobes (though some need a firmware update for this to work). I regularly share a pair of AD200s with my Nikon and a Canon ...


4

Using the Godox TT350N as a means to control your other Godox speedlight is a perfectly viable option. If you later decide to buy a dedicated trigger, you can control both of them. The only drawback is that the controls on the flashes themselves are not as straight forward as they are on the Godox X2 or Xpro. Plus you will probably never use the speedlight ...


3

Normally you would choose the "Optical Remote" option on the camera's menu to do this, even though you're not actually going to be controlling the flashes optically directly from the camera. This is because the camera sees the YN-622C transmitter as a camera mounted external flash. According to the third party written "The Other YN622C Use Guide", the newer ...


3

If indoors, just cover the popup flash with anything (even with your hand, if it's free) leaving some clearance, so the light goes to the sides but not to the subject. It will still fire remote flash with no problems. If outdoors, this is not much of an issue and setting it to -- is usually enough. Additionally, if we're here, you can set your SB700/900 to ...


3

The D800 doesn't have a radio trigger, so yes, it emits light when talking to other flashes -- whether with a dumb optically-triggered slave or with the CLS (Creative Lighting System). The light emitted is minimal, but it's there.


3

As Imre said, AWL is an optical wireless protocol, and requires the IR panel to face the on-camera flash for line-of-sight communication. Getting that IR panel to face the camera is pretty easy: rotate the flash to point the IR panel correctly, then separately turn the flash head to point where you need it. You may have to do some acrobatics with the flash ...


3

Yes, AWL is an optical wireless protocol and you have to use IR panel if you use built-in flash as commander. The on-camera flash will trigger on low power in commander mode during exposure even though the camera manual may state it stays off. Alternatively you could use another flash on hot-shoe (you might be able to shield and bounce it so the command ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible