15

Optically, all this should do is reduce the output power of the flash. The filters on the sensor itself are going to make it so you only get the red green and blue on each pixel. This device would just absorb a bunch of the light that could reach the subject. For example, some of the light to bounce off a red part is going to reach a blue sensor and not ...


15

Put a white sheet between you and the trophy - some distance from the trophy, but basically "all around". Cut a rectangular hole in it that is about the size of the trophy. Use a long lens, and shoot the trophy through the hole. Now most of what is reflected will be "white sheet", with just a small hole in the middle where you were standing. If you further ...


14

Studio strobes are actually much, much, EXTREMELY MUCH more powerful than any remotely sane continuous lighting setup (at lighting scenes for photography). This is because a strobe delivers its ridiculously high intensity light only for a ridiculously short time - usually shorter than your shutter speed. For example, the AlienBees B400 provides 7000 ...


12

You could use an ND filter or even a polarizing filter (which you probably already have) to give yourself another couple of stops.


12

What's illuminating the softbox in the background? I assume not just the strobes? Whatever it is, you probably need to reduce its intensity until it's just barely saturating. The brighter the background is, the more light you're going to have coming through the bottle. (Or, conversely, keep the softbox lit as it is, adjust your exposure so that it just ...


11

Note: the content originally written for Stack Exchange is also published on my own website photo.pelicandd.com. Although the content is the same, the website contains interactive illustrations which enable to see what each light adds to the setup, as well as the list of books which served as sources. The lighting setups shown below describe different ...


10

You WILL have reflections - the question is: what would you like to see there? Seriously. Because 1. You will have to put that there or 2. Do that in post-processing. Both is painful, #2 is a bit less money-wasting, but more time-wasting. :-) You could use a polarizer to remove reflections, if that helps. Makes the object look dull though... Also, you can ...


10

Editing out the eyes removes a metric tonne of information that might have been helpful in answering your question — please don't do that if you're asking about studio lighting problems — but there is still something to be seen in the photos you have posted. Apart from the makeup and post-processing that have already been mentioned in the comments, it's ...


10

There are two basic connectors you will generally find on light stands. First, a 3/8-16 UNC thread (that's 3/8", 16 threads per inch). This is, fortunately, basically standardized in all such gear. Second, a 5/8" stud, usually meant for clamping things to, or often attaching things via a socket with a screw on the side. This socket is often called a "...


10

It's hard to say which is the best approach because, as usual, it depends on what you're trying to convey. However, I think the book Light—Science & Magic: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting is a great source for learning lighting in general, and specifically for tips on how to light glass, how to highlight the borders, how to create intended ...


9

Two things seem apparent to me looking at this setup. First, the position of the subject appears to be a little further from the camera than the lights. Before you fool with the position of any equipment which can take hours to do or : ( re-do, move the subject slightly to and fro. Once you get the optimal contrast in the edges, you could move your lighting ...


9

Essentially this is product photography. I doubt bones require special treatment since they are not very specular. The easiest way it to use a light tent over a glass table with a light from below and diffused lights from the side or falling over the light tent at an angle. The camera and lens really makes little difference. You can buy light tents in ...


8

I think the main problem is your packaging, as Stan mentions in his comment. The packaging is wrinkled such that, no matter where you place your lights, you are going to have some surfaces reflecting onto the camera. If you try to move your lights closer, to make the light softer, you'll have light bouncing off those things at literally every possible ...


8

The halo you describe is actually a reflection either from the background or from the rearmost umbrellas. (The silver lined ones in the picture). Remember that when light bounces off a surface it leaves the surface at the same angle that it came in. This almost rules out the umbrellas as being the culprit, as they are higher than the object, so light coming ...


8

There is no such thing as a "good" or "correct" histogram... the shape and placement of the histogram should reflect the subject/scene recorded. E.g. that histogram looks about right for a picture of a red wine bottle (dark bottle/label) on a white background. This image of mine also has nearly no mid-tones in the histogram; and it shouldn't.


7

Round metallic subjects inherently reflect all of the surroundings, and the camera will always appear in the reflection. The best you can do is control the environment to make it reflect what you want. If your studio is large, lighting only the subject, and making sure the camera and surroundings are dark may be sufficient. Black cloth or paper with a hole ...


7

I don't know your special situation, you did say high energy, but I don't know scale. You want a fast shutter so I assume you want a high speed photo. Perhaps you may need significantly greater power, but in contrast to your stated goal, I can tell you about photography. One problem with a fast shutter speed is that it decimates the longer light, which can ...


7

You need to disable exposure simulation. The EOS M doesn't have a menu option for this but it is disabled with an ETTL flash or ETTL trigger in the hotshoe. (actually any Canon "dedicated" flash will also communicate with the camera and disable Exp Sim) You could also install Magic Lantern as it includes a menu option to disable Exp Sim.


7

Unless you have a matt ballon which I never ever have seen, you will have a reflection. The point is what reflection you can handle. If you do not want a hotspot, use as Romero Ninov said a softbox. If you do not want a rectangle as a catchlight (which can be pretty nice) use a light tent. Make a box of PVC pipes and construct the walls of vegetal paper (...


6

A regular softbox is not going to fit on this type of light. They are designed for strobes with a single bulb which acts as a point light source and attach via a small hole in the back. This light seems to consist of a series of florescent tubes and is thus a much larger lightsource to begin with, and will be pretty soft in it's standard configuration. You ...


6

Sunlight is good but, as you note, it is also variable. By using a good high CRI ("Color rendering index")source, as James Snell notes, and by doing tests with white balance, you will be able to get results with artificial light that have far better consistency than you can achieve with sunlight, and which are close enough to the best that sunlight can give ...


6

When we talk about flash photography; this is because the shutter speed does not contribute to the exposure from the flash. A flash will output a burst which last maybe 1/1000s, so changing the shutter speed won't affect the exposure from the flash but form the other continuous light sources. And since the light meter used in the first video you linked ...


6

There are two basic techniques in the photo you reference: First, it uses "clamshell" or "butterfly" lighting — see What is butterfly lighting, and when do I use it? for more. You can easily see this from the highlights in the model's pupils. The resolution is low enough that I can't tell if the fill light (from underneath) is a reflector or an actual light;...


6

I am not sure about who used the Beauty Dish for photography first, but the principle of evenly illumination via secondary reflection is accredited to danish mathematician Piet Hein, who constructed the R(a) - lamp in 1931 to alleviate the harsh direct light from the electric bulb in reading-situations. source: http://www.futuraoslo.no/index.php?/produkter/...


6

Sorry, there is no way to make older studio strobes automatic, or even semi-automatic. You must use Manual mode for every photo. 1/200 is the max sync speed on your camera, but when using radio triggers, there is sometimes a very slight delay introduced. To be safe start with with 1/160 f/8 ISO 100. You can then adjust the power of the strobes to get the ...


6

There is possibly some confusion here but I need to clarify that Quartz bulbs ARE tungsten filament bulbs as well (both "incandescent" bulbs - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb) "Normal" bulbs (Thank you Mr Edison), which is probably what you are referring as "tungsten", are filled with an inert gas and are not able to burn as brightly ...


6

Without getting into the mathematics of the situation which is covered by others with graphs and equations, let me try to clarify the difference between these two different aspects of the lighting. Quantity and quality. The quantity or the amount of light is determined by how far the light travels. All other things being equal, the shorter the distance the ...


6

Put your glass vertically so that you can see through it (A). Put a piece of black cloth far away behind the glass (B). Put a flash on top of the glass, almost (C). Use some cardboard or some reflective surface so the light only illuminates the glass (D). Put the camera out of the light. The light from the flash is much greater than the light coming from ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible