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72

Ok, since you've asked for creative ways, here we go. Place the id card at the left side of the frame, take an under exposed photo with a long shutter time (5 seconds), fire a flash, turn the id card around and place it at the right side of the frame, fire the the flash a second time. We now have both sides of the id card in a single shot without any ...


50

Yes, there's something you can do. Stop using the card and replace it. Even reputable, high-quality cards have failures. And every such device has a limited lifespan. Don't risk it. You may do something which will cover up the problem, only for it to reoccur and cause you to lose images. SanDisk offers a long warranty in most countries — depending on the ...


47

Well, you asked for creative, you didn't say practical: Gravitational lensing. Place the card edge on and behind a sufficiently massive body. Position the card and camera correctly and both faces will be visible, albeit substantially redshifted, one side worse than the other. Obtaining the sufficiently massive body (neutron star or black hole) to do so ...


38

Split the card along its thickness and photograph the halves side by side. Glue them back together if necessary. Alternatively, lose the card, have it replaced, and then find the original. Photograph the reverse of one with the obverse of the other.


38

What you are describing is shutter lag. When you press the shutter release, the camera must focus before exposing the image. There are many ways of avoiding this. The easiest is to half-press the shutter so that the camera focuses, then press fully down when you want to take the image. Because the half-press will focus, there is less or no lag when you ...


35

tell me whats happening Considering that the White Thing seems to affect an entire band at the top of the image, I don't think it's a light leak. A leak that happened to shine evenly across the entire width of the sensor would be hard to explain. Instead, it looks like the shutter is getting a little bit stuck near the end of its travel across the sensor. ...


27

Because that rainbow is partially obscured by your subject, I would tend to believe that it has nothing to do with any of your equipment. Rather, there was something in the room acting as a prism and diffracting light into a rainbow pattern that just happened to fall within the frame of what you were shooting. It might be that the source of the light was ...


26

The solution is simple. Give up on that sissy 35mm or digital stuff, and get your hands on some film for real photographers: 4x5 film! Then all you have to do is go in a dark room, wrap the film around the ID, and make a contact print (err... contact negative?) with a single strobe flash! If you can tune the flash correctly, there should be a difference ...


26

Well, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Whether that's because of user error (film not installed right so it didn't catch on the advancing mechanism) or a hardware issue with the advance mechanism not working properly can't really be determined without more information and/or inspection of the camera... Try taking a couple shots ...


22

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


22

Looking at your samples, the answer seems clear to me: that's not grainy, that is, actually, out of focus. Here's a 1:1 crop of your wide-open image: It seems pretty apparent that the wooden sign is sharp but the dog isn't, and the appearance of the blur looks completely in line with what one would expect from out-of-focus blur, not noise or grain. ...


21

It can be done with a single shot on a smart phone. In this photo I stuck my "ID" (business card) on the end of a pen and started a panoramic shot with an iPhone. Once the card was out of shot, I flipped it and moved it so it would be back in shot again. I cropped the photo to remove superfluous background. Important to keep the card steady! You can see ...


20

I can not imagine damage that would impact focusing without visible damage to the packaging or the camera. These things are pretty sturdy. you would have to damage the mirror or shutter box to really have an impact. So I suspect user error. These images appear to be in focus, but perhaps not where the photographer expected. I see areas in focus in both. ...


20

Doing double exposures with the k1000 requires that you cock the shutter using the lever while simultaneously holding down the release on the camera bottom. This allows the shutter to cock while not advancing the film. Check to make sure that this release button isn’t sticking in.


19

You don't have a light leak in your camera body. Your examples demonstrate the classic symptom of a slow second shutter curtain. Your second shutter curtain is sticking at the end of it's transit across the sensor. The fix may require only a bit of cleaning and lubrication, or it may require a new shutter assembly. Unfortunately, a shutter replacement ...


18

If you only see the effect when the D7500 is turned on but not when the camera is turned off you are almost certainly seeing near-infrared light recorded by the camera taking the photo. It's fairly common for most digital cameras to record such light. The easiest example I can think of are the near countless photos people have posted in various forums of an ...


16

You certainly knocked the diopter adjustement out of place. It is there to compensate for people who need eye-glasses. With your eye looking through the viewfinder, adjust the knob on the upper right side until you see what is in focus clearly sharp.


15

The only sound that would come from the sensor itself would be a self-cleaning function, which only happens when you run the self cleaning, or turn the camera on/off. The sensor vibrates to shake off dust. This would not be happening when you are shooting. When you half press, the sounds you might hear would be from the lens AF motor or image ...


15

You're hearing the IS start to activate.


15

When you shoot monochrome as RAW files, the monochrome setting is just meta-data in the RAW file. The raw data from the sensor is still the same. You will only see the monochrome effect when you view the file in a program that supports the monochrome flag. Obviously what you are using to preview the images doesn't support it. The program from Nikon for ...


14

You're exactly right — it's the same thing as a monitor pixel error, but on your camera's sensor rather than on an LCD screen. * You can either fix it in post-processing (automatically, with many RAW-processing packages) or have it mapped out with the camera's firmware. If you're lucky, your camera model includes a built-in feature to do that yourself in ...


14

Troubleshooting a lens: Lens Toggle: Make sure the toggle on the lens is firmly in the AF position. Contacts: Check the metal contacts on the lens to make sure they are clear of debris and are clean. Ring: Make sure the focus ring isn't obstructed. It should move freely when on MF and become more firm when on AF (for your lens, not all lenses do this). ...


13

There is definitely something very wrong here. That's not a focus or DOF issue, but looks like the lens suffers from extremely strong field curvature. It's normal for a lens to be sharper in the center than around the edges, and this effect gets stronger with wide open aperture and at the extreme ends of the zoom range (your last sentence indicates that you ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


12

The D5000 has a quite specific set of requirements for using the AF assist illuminator outside of the pre-defined scene modes. The lens has to be in autofocus mode (obviously). The autofocus mode must be set to single (AF-S) or using AF-S in AF-A mode. The autofocus area mode must be set to Auto, or if it's set to any of the other modes (Single point, ...


12

There is a little microswitch in the hotshoe that detects an external flash -- this may have become stuck, or got a piece of grit blocking it. If you cannot see anything under the rails, you may have to take it to your local friendly Canon authorised repair centre, but if you can see some grit, you may be able to carefully remove it with a cocktail stick or ...


12

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around the ...


12

You are seeing chromatic aberration — a prismatic effect which, as you nicely illustrate, reduces sharpness even in black and white photography. A lens which has greater correction for this is called an apochromatic lens — often something like "APO" in the lens name. Note that in lenses for telescopes and microscopes, you'll often also see achromatic ...


12

The question is extremely broad. There are a lot of questions and answers here that address particular aspects of blurry pictures. Putting all of that in one answer would be excessively long as well as redundant. I've grouped many of them under different headings and provided links to other questions and answers here at photography at stack exchange. Is ...


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