76

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


47

The pop-up flash produces notoriously bad results if it is allowed to overpower any ambient light and is used as the main light. This is because it is a small, hard light, and it is directly on the camera axis, so you can get a washed out look, particularly if you're photographic a human face - no light and shadow areas. If you use it as fill, it can ...


32

Sure. If you're in a situation where documenting the events in front of you is more important than making a photograph which looks nice, there's sometimes just no other way. You can open the aperture, crank up the ISO and drag the shutter as long as possible, but if it's dark, it's dark. You don't always have control over that, and sometimes you just need ...


26

Webpage with examples at bottom of this post: "Real photographers" [tm] would die rather than use a pop up flash. They'd rather have a large piece of extra equipment on top of or remotely linked to the camera at all times to allow variation in lighting level, multi axis bounce, HSS features, diffuser and reflector options, power variation, exposure method ...


17

The most typical reasoning for this circular obstruction is the use of a lens hood that is obstructing the flash. It could also be caused by a rather large lens itself getting in the way as well. A similar effect can be found when a wide angle lens is used that is beyond the coverage of the flash. I would consider what lenses you were using, at what focal ...


15

To be a bit more specific, this is the superposition of a very short exposure with flash, the clear sharp part overlaid by an underexposed long exposure shot (the blurry part) However, the amount of motion blur for a 1/60 shot is unusually large, so you likely took the picture from far away. This would also explain why the blurred part is so visible, your ...


10

Assuming all other exposure settings with and without flash are equal, then using flash means you are adding light to the scene. Increased light in the scene means increased light down the lens, which means more light at the sensor. That means you have a higher signal to noise ratio at the sensor, which generally means less noise. Signal to Noise ratio, or ...


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

In Av (and Tv) mode, flash is not assumed to be primary light source, so camera will choose exposure to match metered ambient light. In P mode, however, the camera tries to ensure exposure time is quick enough for handheld shooting, and thus will happily expose for the flash-illuminated subject, ignoring the lack of ambient light. To put it in flash terms, ...


8

Camera flashes are generally balanced for daylight equivalent color temperature. That means that the white balance used with flash expects a much bluer light than typical indoor lighting. If your flash is providing most of the light, that's perfect. But when it isn't, the color temperature of the ambient light is dominant. That's what's causing the orange ...


7

Lens hoods attached to super-zoom kit lenses contain a shadow monster that is released when exposed to light from the built-in flash. Remove the hood to avoid letting the monster escape into your photos. @mattdm, @dpollitt, @YaoBoLu, and @JohnGleeson are all correct. Light from the built-in flash hitting the lens hood casts a shadow. If the lens is large ...


6

You ask for any advice, so I'm going to provide that. Your built-in flash seems like it's broken. So, you should ignore it and get a shoe-mount flash, since your camera comes with a standard hot shoe. This comes with several advantages, including significantly increased power, and (with most flashes) the ability to bounce the light off of the ceiling instead ...


6

For me this is motion blur. And because is the same on all the objects edges it is caused by slow shutter speed. Try to use 1/100, 1/160. Also you should know internal flash usually have very limited power and range. So the other advice I can give you (if you often take photos in low light) is to invest in external flashlight.


5

You really only need ONE flash for almost all situations outside. Unless there's a specific look (or effect) I'm going after, I only use a single flash when outside. Indoor studio is a whole other discussion. With flash photos outside during the day, keep in mind, you have two light sources. The sun and your flash. I don't even try to overpower the big ball ...


5

This is called Slow Sync, which is a technique that allows you to combine flash with an ambient light exposure. You probably turned this on by mistake. Generally, that's by holding the flash button (the one that pops up the flash) and turning the control wheel. Your manual is here, see page 47 (in the PDF, technically pg 35 in the actual manual).


4

I know you are asking about post-processing tricks, but I'm going to offer a popup flash shooting trick that does wonders. Take a business card with white background and use it to bounce the flash to the ceiling and prevent the harsh light of the flash from hitting your subject directly. You can hold the card with your free hand, or if you make two small ...


4

Most Chuck E. Cheese locations that I've been in have generic white ceiling tiles. If that is the case at the location in your town, I would try bouncing the flash off of the ceiling with an external flash rather than using a Puffer. Although the cost is a bit more, the results will be that much better. You can get a Yongnuo YN-468 II i-TTL that is ...


4

The flash will not automatically activate in all camera modes as some leave the decision up to the user when you are exercising a degree of manual control. If you are in manual for example it will only fire when you specifically turn it on by popping it up. More specifically for the 60D, on page 129 of your manual it indicates In Creative Zone modes, ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


4

Angle the flash to bounce off the ceiling or a grey card by blocking the flash with a mirror. Simply shutter a bit slower or bump the ISO to account for the decrease in intensity. If it's a thin plastic mirror you might be able to tape it in place, otherwise use a clamp to hold it on a stand.


3

The D800 doesn't have a radio trigger, so yes, it emits light when talking to other flashes -- whether with a dumb optically-triggered slave or with the CLS (Creative Lighting System). The light emitted is minimal, but it's there.


3

You must get your flash off your camera. Once you do that, one strobe lets you do great stuff. In addition to Zack Arias, check out David Hobby http://strobist.blogspot.com/ and specifically his Lignting 101 series: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html As others have noted, a reflector (typically under $50) can greatly extend the one ...


3

Here are a few ways I have fixed washed-out photos be it from the flash or just in general. Adjust levels - I will slide the black slider to the right to darken the photo. Sometimes if only part of the photo is washed out I will use a mask on the levels to darken only what I want to. This masking can get complicated and I recommend looking up some ...


3

Make a virtue out of it I recently heard the saying "Go big or go home!" In that spirit (and if all else fails): Make it look like you were going for that flat, washed-out look. Aim for that hard-light, pap / glam look. Crank up the exposure (highlights) so most of the skin is burned out. Judiciously remove contrast. Either de-saturate or over-...


3

The "flash busy" message is shown when the flash is charging and not yet ready to be used. The flash works by slowly charging a capacitor from the batteries and then discharging all that power in a very short time. If your batteries are low on power or you have low quality batteries it will take longer to charge the flash and so you'll see a lot of "flash ...


3

I think not. The problems with the popup flash are: 1. it's too small - this makes the light source very hard, 2. it's too close to the lens - light coming from the camera's direction tends to "flatten" the image and 3. it's not very powerful. The diffuser you linked to is still too small, still too close to the lens and will only reduce the light output ...


3

The shadow is most likely from the lens/lens hood which block part of the beam from the flash, since build in flashes are generally not high enough to reach above many of the lenses/lens hoods. I would probably consider to use something that you can put in front of the flash that can bounce the beam to a ceiling, if you are indoor and the ceiling is not too ...


3

This behavior is perfectly normal for a Canon 60D, and most other Canon EOS bodies. When you select Av Mode with E-TTL in lower light environments, the camera assumes you want to expose the entire scene correctly for the ambient light and then use the flash to illuminate your subject in the foreground. If you wish to disable this slow sync feature, use ...


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