76

The peak power at work when a flash is being discharged is extreme. Example: a classic Metz 45CT (a large but still handheld unit) on full manual power delivers around 90 watt-seconds of electrical output to the flash tube in 1/300s. That means there are 27000 watts at work for a short time. A 27000 watt lightbulb (BTW, your flash is much brighter than ...


17

The most typical reasoning for this circular obstruction is the use of a lens hood that is obstructing the flash. It could also be caused by a rather large lens itself getting in the way as well. A similar effect can be found when a wide angle lens is used that is beyond the coverage of the flash. I would consider what lenses you were using, at what focal ...


15

To be a bit more specific, this is the superposition of a very short exposure with flash, the clear sharp part overlaid by an underexposed long exposure shot (the blurry part) However, the amount of motion blur for a 1/60 shot is unusually large, so you likely took the picture from far away. This would also explain why the blurred part is so visible, your ...


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


9

In Av (and Tv) mode, flash is not assumed to be primary light source, so camera will choose exposure to match metered ambient light. In P mode, however, the camera tries to ensure exposure time is quick enough for handheld shooting, and thus will happily expose for the flash-illuminated subject, ignoring the lack of ambient light. To put it in flash terms, ...


8

Camera flashes are generally balanced for daylight equivalent color temperature. That means that the white balance used with flash expects a much bluer light than typical indoor lighting. If your flash is providing most of the light, that's perfect. But when it isn't, the color temperature of the ambient light is dominant. That's what's causing the orange ...


7

Lens hoods attached to super-zoom kit lenses contain a shadow monster that is released when exposed to light from the built-in flash. Remove the hood to avoid letting the monster escape into your photos. @mattdm, @dpollitt, @YaoBoLu, and @JohnGleeson are all correct. Light from the built-in flash hitting the lens hood casts a shadow. If the lens is large ...


6

You ask for any advice, so I'm going to provide that. Your built-in flash seems like it's broken. So, you should ignore it and get a shoe-mount flash, since your camera comes with a standard hot shoe. This comes with several advantages, including significantly increased power, and (with most flashes) the ability to bounce the light off of the ceiling instead ...


6

For me this is motion blur. And because is the same on all the objects edges it is caused by slow shutter speed. Try to use 1/100, 1/160. Also you should know internal flash usually have very limited power and range. So the other advice I can give you (if you often take photos in low light) is to invest in external flashlight.


4

The flash will not automatically activate in all camera modes as some leave the decision up to the user when you are exercising a degree of manual control. If you are in manual for example it will only fire when you specifically turn it on by popping it up. More specifically for the 60D, on page 129 of your manual it indicates In Creative Zone modes, ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


4

Most Chuck E. Cheese locations that I've been in have generic white ceiling tiles. If that is the case at the location in your town, I would try bouncing the flash off of the ceiling with an external flash rather than using a Puffer. Although the cost is a bit more, the results will be that much better. You can get a Yongnuo YN-468 II i-TTL that is ...


4

Angle the flash to bounce off the ceiling or a grey card by blocking the flash with a mirror. Simply shutter a bit slower or bump the ISO to account for the decrease in intensity. If it's a thin plastic mirror you might be able to tape it in place, otherwise use a clamp to hold it on a stand.


3

The shadow is most likely from the lens/lens hood which block part of the beam from the flash, since build in flashes are generally not high enough to reach above many of the lenses/lens hoods. I would probably consider to use something that you can put in front of the flash that can bounce the beam to a ceiling, if you are indoor and the ceiling is not too ...


3

I think not. The problems with the popup flash are: 1. it's too small - this makes the light source very hard, 2. it's too close to the lens - light coming from the camera's direction tends to "flatten" the image and 3. it's not very powerful. The diffuser you linked to is still too small, still too close to the lens and will only reduce the light output ...


3

The "flash busy" message is shown when the flash is charging and not yet ready to be used. The flash works by slowly charging a capacitor from the batteries and then discharging all that power in a very short time. If your batteries are low on power or you have low quality batteries it will take longer to charge the flash and so you'll see a lot of "flash ...


3

This behavior is perfectly normal for a Canon 60D, and most other Canon EOS bodies. When you select Av Mode with E-TTL in lower light environments, the camera assumes you want to expose the entire scene correctly for the ambient light and then use the flash to illuminate your subject in the foreground. If you wish to disable this slow sync feature, use ...


3

The flash typically wont fire if it is not charged enough to fire, so I don't believe there is any risk of damage. I would recommend that you simply change the battery rather than trying to work around the laws of physics.


3

Canon DSLR's operate in so-called "slow sync" mode when in Av mode. That means, the exposure time is set to expose for ambient light, just like without flash. This is useful to freeze your foreground subject with the flash, but still get a natural background lighting. (try shooting a person at night in the open to see the difference!) I like to dial in a ...


3

I can't figure out how to activate the flash... Page 91 of your PowerShot G5 X manual explains that you activate the flash by lifting it up. Other cameras have a button or switch that you can use to release the flash, but on this model you just grasp the flash on the sides and swing it up into position. Once you've done that, you can access the flash ...


3

Only in auto mode will the flash automatically pop up. If you are in the manual type modes, you have to hit the flash button on the top left side of the camera to pop the flash up.


2

To troubleshoot this, I would suggest the following: 1) Make sure camera is fully charged. If battery is low, camera may not feel there is enough power for the flash. 2) If hotshoe flash is attached, remove and reseat, making sure it is on correctly. Check battery levels. 3) Close built-in flash, and half press shutter release. Does the built-in flash ...


2

Two possibilities: There is physical damage to the flash pop-up mechanism (such as a spring popped out), and you should take it to a camera store. You have switched to a different mode where the flash won't pop-up automatically, or your flash is on "auto" and the camera doesn't think it needs flash. It will usually pop up automatically if the flash is in "...


2

Check to see if custom setting e3 is set to commander mode. If so the camera thinks you want to use the pop up flash to control slave units. You need to change the mode to any of the other options: TTL, Manual, or Repeating. This is covered on page 223 of your owner's manual. If that is not it, make sure the external flash in powered on, and that it is ...


2

You are using your flash on 'red eye removal' Icon: thunder+eye, put it on normal flash Icon: just the thunder.


2

Simply, No. I have a D600, and a set of 3 photix odins (nikon) and 3 sb600s. The commander fits on top the D600, but the cameras built in flash only incompletely opens and will not flash with the odin on top. The Odin commander does allow full CTS with three flash groups, and remote zooming of your flash (so it is an improvement on the Nikon inbuilt CLS with ...


2

I use a Nikon D3000 which should be similar. In the camera menu (shooting menu, I think) you can control the power of the flash manually. Change the flash to manual rather than TTL, then set the power you would like (e.g. 1/2, 1/4, etc.). It's slow, and I can't think of a quicker way for the on-camera flash, but it will at least allow you to use it. ...


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