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59

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


35

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (30, 15, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence ...


29

The easiest way to solve this problem is to use a neutral-density filter. They are essentially neutral grey filters that cut down on the light reaching the film or digital sensor. Good ones are fairly expensive, because they are surprisingly hard to manufacture. Another option is to shoot in more favourable conditions, like overcast days or really early ...


27

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture (...


26

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


26

The first step is to find a situation where the atmosphere is right for such effects to appear to the naked eye - whether it's steam or fog or dust or whatever else in the air that is reflecting the light. Once you have that, the lens, aperture, shutter and ISO don't matter as much, as long as the combination chosen results in a good exposure and the ...


25

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of a photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 seconds (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


25

The blur is caused by the people moving while you were taking the photograph with a slow shutter. Honestly, I think it improves this particular photo a lot: it shows that the people are dancing, rather than just standing in weird positions. If you want to, the only way to avoid it is to use a faster shutter speed. This necessarily involves compromises. If ...


24

Those listed are full stops. Most cameras allow you to increment shutter speed and aperture in half-stops or one-third stops, and you can select intermediate values manually. If you have the camera set to half-stops, then you'll have 1/350 between 1/250 and 1/500. If you have 1/3 stop increments set, you'll have 1/320 and 1/400 To work these out, a full ...


23

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


22

It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


21

The term "exposure" is used for a number of different but related things in photography. I can see how this might be confusing. Here are six different ways in which it is used: The combination of all factors which make a photograph have a certain overall brightness. The key factors are shutter speed, lens aperture, and sensor or film sensitivity (a.k.a. ISO)...


21

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


20

Here's a really good case for the application of Okham's Razor. The simplest explanation is that the image was shot outdoors, under the midday sun. The blur was not added in post but is the result of the close shooting distance and relatively wide aperture of f/4. The fast shutter speed was required otherwise the shot would have been overexposed due to the ...


19

Camera motion is usually measured in terms of angular size or arc: that is, how many degrees, minutes, seconds of arc the optical axis moves during the time the shutter is open. How much the same amount of motion affects the image is also determined by the angular size of the Field of View (FoV) yielded by a particular focal length and film/sensor size. For ...


18

Despite what it might look like, this is not a focal plane shutter effect. A focal plane shutter effect causes distortion because different parts of the frame are exposed at different times. For a spinning blade that moves a fraction of a rotation during the entire exposure, the blade would appear curved and its thickness wrong. However, that is not what ...


18

The shutter you hear is a mechanical shutter and it cannot on a DSLR move fast enough to shoot at video speeds which is between 24 and 60 FPS. High-end mechanical shutters usually top at 12 FPS. The shutter used in video and high-speed drive on some cameras is an electronic shutter. There are no moving parts involved and hence no sound. The sensor simply ...


18

The camera is likely setting the shutter speed to match the flash sync speed of the camera. If it was set any faster, you would get black bands of underexposure across your shots, or at the fastest speeds a completely black shot. This is because the shutters would have finished moving to some degree before the flash completed its fire.


18

The Factors There is an equation, and by convention, it's set up to be really simple. There are basically five factors to consider together: Aperture — the size of the opening which lets light in, Shutter Duration (or shutter speed) — the amount of time the sensor (or film) gets that light, Sensitivity (or ISO, or sometimes "film speed") — how quickly the ...


17

why does shutter speed modify picture sharpness/detail? Why do pictures get darker with faster shutter speeds, and brighter with slower shutter speeds? These things happen because the light sensor in the camera doesn't measure the intensity of light instantaneously, but rather measures all the light received during the entire exposure. You could say that ...


16

The problem is the read-out speed. You cannot read the entire sensor fast enough for this to work in the general case. Even if you could. there would also be a detrimental effect on image quality as you would be applying read-out noise over and over again. At least with CMOS sensors you can read at random locations but with CCD sensors each row is shifted ...


16

Calibrating your Shutter Speed Unless you are performing photographic telemetry or a variety of other niche scientific measurements, the only reason to know the exact length of your exposure is to achieve accurate exposure. Although it is rare for a modern camera's shutter to drift by a stop or more and still continue to function, old war horses with spring ...


14

Most DSLRs let you choose shutter speed and aperture at 1/3 of a stop difference (3 clicks of the dial to double or halve the amount of light), I'm not a camera designer but I would guess that since 1/3 of a stop is a small difference being able to set exact shutter speed isn't worth the extra electronics and software to support it. For aperture also add to ...


14

Yes it is possible with all DSLRs. The 30s limit of all non-Olympus DSLRs is for timed exposures, meaning you dial in the time ahead of time and the exposure takes up to 30s (or 60s for Olympus). All DSLRs also have a bulb mode which you press the shutter to start the exposure and let go when you are done. This can also be done with a remote control which ...


14

I initially marked this as a duplicate of How can I avoid star trails without an expensive tracking mount?, but on reflection, I think the answer here is simply the assumption in that one: to get a night-sky exposure longer than 30 seconds or so, you have to track the motion of the sky, and a fancy tracking mount is the way to do that. It looks (from the ...


14

Apart from using an ND filter, you might be able to achieve the desired effect by taking multiple photos and then blending them in post processing. Either an automatic blend with "ghost removal" might work, or layering the images and manually masking/unmasking selectively (in effect "painting out" the people). All of this pretty much requires a tripod for ...


14

Honestly, the biggest problem I see in your picture is not the blur, but the badly clipped highlights. Next time, try shooting at, say, -1 EV (which will also reduce the exposure time, and thus the blur, a bit) and adjusting the exposure afterwards to get softer highlights. This does increase noise in the shadows a bit, as if you were using a higher ISO ...


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