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23

The camera usually keeps the aperture open as wide as possible while framing the shot. It is only closed to the setting you dialed in when the picture is being taken. This allows for a brighter viewfinder and more of the auto focus points to be used. As described in the manual of your camera on page 114, there's a dedicated button to stop down the aperture ...


22

The answer is here, from Nikon: Minimum Focus Distance The minimum focus distance is the shortest distance at which a lens can focus. In the case of digital SLR cameras, the distance to the subject is measured from the focal plane mark on the camera body, not from the front of the lens. Since the lens has a minimum focus distance of 18.5cm, and is 8....


21

You are correct that the term "macro" means large scale (e.g. macroeconomics), however its use in photography is relative to microphotography, that is imaging using microscopes. The tradition definition of a macro lens is one that can achieve a 1:1 magnification, which means the image projected onto the recording medium is life size. So for a common APS-C ...


21

Sure. There's something called a light field camera, or plenoptic camera. It captures a much lower resolution than a normal camera, but it also captures additional information that allows it to be refocused after the fact. And to a very limited degree, dual-pixel RAW in the Canon 5D Mark IV allows refocusing after the fact, but not by very much. That ...


20

Here's a really good case for the application of Okham's Razor. The simplest explanation is that the image was shot outdoors, under the midday sun. The blur was not added in post but is the result of the close shooting distance and relatively wide aperture of f/4. The fast shutter speed was required otherwise the shot would have been overexposed due to the ...


20

what shall i do please to have high magnification inside pulp canals with high magnification more than 25x Buy a suitable microscope. No DSLR lens will provide the level of magnification you need, particularly at a focal distance that makes sense for dentistry. Macro lenses get a lot of their ability to magnify just from being able to focus at very short ...


20

Macro photography is all about the skill of the photographer, lenses, and lighting - in that order. Only after the former have been considered should the differences between two APS-C cameras from the same manufacturer that appear to both use the same sensor be considered as a relatively minor difference. The primary differences between the EOS Rebel T7i/...


19

I disagree with some of the things MikeW said. No matter what is between the subject and the sensor (or film), there will be light loss relative to what you would otherwise expect by considering only the f-stop. This is basic physics. The additional light loss relative to f-stop is 1/(1 + M)2, where M is the magnification from the real subject to its size ...


18

Technically any software that is capable of stitching regular photos would be capable of stitching macro photos as well. However, to be able to accurately stitch photos they need to be taken with little or no parallax (movement of the camera's optical centre). This is typically achieved by rotating the camera/lens about it's optical centre using a "VR" ...


15

"What are the different types of macro lenses"? There are "Macro" lenses and there are Macro lenses. As others have mentioned, a true Macro lens will magnify the subject to a 1:1 ratio which is generally a desirable feature. Many lenses will be marketed as 'Macro' lenses even though they don't magnify down to 1:1 so be careful to check the actual ...


15

These are known as Chromatic Aberrations or Colour Fringing. These predominantly occur around areas with high contrast such as sharp edges in photographs or around the white water bottle and dark background in your case. A wider apeture can affect the lenses sensitivity to aberrations although certain lenses can see this "effect" vary depending on focal ...


14

You can use focus stacking. It is a way to combine similar pictures at lower DOF to create a picture of larger DOF. This video details the procedure.


14

That is part of the art and difficulty of macro photography. As with all lenses, only one plane is in perfect focus and everything closer and further will be blurry. The only thing to do to maximize depth-of-field in one shot is to pick a small aperture. It is recommended to use something up to the diffraction limit of your camera which should be about F/16,...


14

"Strobists" are the followers of teachings of David Hobby published in his blog, "The Strobist". Strobism is usually characterized by using small flashes (designed for on-camera use) in manual mode off camera to achieve better lighting than available from ambient lighting. The flashes are often accompanied by portable and/or DIY light modifiers and set-up ...


14

You are just too close to your subject. Cell phone cameras and "Point and Shoot" cameras can take photos from very close distances. DSLR cameras can not. It is actually the lens that determines how close you can shoot. Most general purpose lenses have a minimum focus distance of about 9-12 inches. If you need to focus closer you can buy a specialty "Macro" ...


14

A lens only focuses on one plane. For normal cameras / lenses the plane is parallel to the film/sensor, so only objects at a particular distance from the lens will be in perfect focus, though things some way in front of and behind that plane will be acceptably sharp. smaller aperture settings (bigger f numbers) increase that range, and larger aperture ...


13

The principle of physics behind this behaviour is nothing more than the thin lens formula: 1/o + 1/i = 1/f Where o is the object distance (distance from lens to subject), i is the image distance (distance from lens to sensor), and f is the focal length. For a very large object distance (approaching infinity) the 1/o term drops to zero, hence: 1/i = 1/f i ...


13

It depends entirely on how the lens was designed, there is no general formula or way of determining the minimum focus distance. Lenses of the same focal length can have completely different minimum focus distances depending on which factors the lens designer chose to optimise.


13

Macro and portrait lenses are generally designed to do two different things that require different design characteristics. Macro lenses are designed to focus at very close distances and they typically render a fairly flat field of focus. There are a few very specialized macro lenses that can only focus at the very close focus distances required by macro ...


13

Macro and close-up photography require having the correct lenses. Upgrading the body won't do much good. If you don't already have suitable lenses, the money would be better spent getting one. Before upgrading the body, it would be helpful to first identify what is unsatisfactory about your current setup. Otherwise, you risk getting another camera with ...


13

There is no direct relationship between Telephoto focal lengths and Macro capability. There are some fixed focal length prime lenses that fall into the Telephoto range in terms of focal length and also are capable of close enough focus to be Macro lenses. But a lens doesn't have to be a telephoto lens to have Macro capability and there are many Macro lenses ...


12

Some thoughts, a bit Canon-oriented because that is the system I am using, but this should not make much of a difference: Focal length is the main difference between macros. Given that you want to shoot at 1:1 (otherwise you probably don't need a true macro in the first place!), focal length dictates the distance from the camera to the subject; a longer ...


12

The 1:1 ratio means you can focus close enough that you can fill the frame with an object the same size as the sensor. I.e. for an APS-C DSLR this means you can focus on an object only 22mm wide. The 1:1 reproduction ratio is independent of focal length, you can have a 50mm macro and a 200mm macro both filling the frame with the same 22mm wide object, ...


12

A simple lens (like the lens in a pair of glasses) forms an image at a distance of f behind the lens for an object at infinity (where f is the focal length). The same lens will form an image at 2f behind the lens for an object 2f in front of the lens. This will achieve 1:1 magnification, i.e. the definition of macro. Thus any single element lens is a macro ...


12

Flipping a lens around by itself doesn't make it a macro lens. However, since that is the main purpose of flipping a lens, a reverse mount moves the lens farther from the camera than it would be normally, giving it the ability to focus closer. This is the same effect as extension tubes. The reason for flipping the lens instead of just moving it farther ...


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