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48

The ISO of a film roll indicates how sensitive that whole film roll is to light. That's a chemical property of the film roll, which you cannot change shot by shot. The ISO "setting" on your camera does not actually set the ISO of your film, as that is physically impossible. It does tell (the light meter of) the camera what the sensitivity is of the ...


41

There is an ISO which is not necessarily 200 that is the native sensitivity of the silicon from which the sensor is made. That sensitivity depends on the sensor itself, so will vary between cameras, but it is almost always between ISO 100 and 200. The camera amplifies the signal to get higher sensitivities. It scales down the signal to get lower ones. ...


32

The mountain and the valley obviously are static -- even more from that distance. The clouds, however, move. If you chose a low ISO value, e.g., in the range of 50 to 100, the exposure time might be enough to get washy/faded/blurred clouds. If I calculated it correctly, an ISO value of 100 with the other settings (exluding shutter speed) staying the same ...


32

So I first shoot with ISO 1600 and shutter speed set to 1/125 second and then I shoot with ISO 3200 and shutter speed set to 1/250 second. The amount of light should be identical and indeed both shots look properly exposed and exposed the same way. The amount of light is not identical. You let twice as much light into the camera at 1/125 second than at 1/...


29

The easiest way to solve this problem is to use a neutral-density filter. They are essentially neutral grey filters that cut down on the light reaching the film or digital sensor. Good ones are fairly expensive, because they are surprisingly hard to manufacture. Another option is to shoot in more favourable conditions, like overcast days or really early ...


28

The look you are going for is known as low key lighting. It is not necessary for the room to be dark. You just need to put enough light on your subject that there is a large enough difference between the shadows and the highlights. I took this self portrait by shooting into a mirror in a fully lit room. By using a good amount of flash power I could use a ...


26

Like many questions about what setting works best: It depends. The native ISO for almost all Canon DLSRs over the last few years has been ISO 100. 'Full stop' intervals, such as ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800, etc. increase the analog amplification of the signal readout of the sensor. The 1/3 stops in between those full stops use software adjustments during in-...


26

This is a perfect example of "expose to the right" — that is, even though you want the final result to be low key (largely dark), take the initial exposure as bright as you can (without blowing out the brighter part of the sky, reflections, or any more subtle brighter areas). When you expose so that dark areas are really dark — either because you are ...


25

I think "several fluorescent fixtures that I use to light my studio" is the key here. I'm guessing that the very high ISOs are accompanied by very short shutter speeds. Fluorescent lights cycle, and there are color variations within the cycle. Repeat your test with incandescent light or sunlight (or a strobe with high-speed sync). See Do fluorescent ...


23

The information your friend gave you was essentially correct for most digital cameras, particularly compact digital cameras with very small sensors, made about 15-20 years ago. Digital imaging sensors were more primitive and noise reduction techniques were less sophisticated. By placing the native sensitivity of a sensor at one stop higher than what ...


22

It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


21

The Factors There is an equation, and by convention, it's set up to be really simple. There are basically five factors to consider together: Aperture — the size of the opening which lets light in, Shutter Duration (or shutter speed) — the amount of time the sensor (or film) gets that light, Sensitivity (or ISO, or sometimes "film speed") — how quickly the ...


19

Just because the image is mostly black doesn't mean the scene is dark. With a flash positioned on the left pointing at the subject (he's facing the flash) and a black backdrop you could possibly even pull this off in daylight. Start with a low ISO, a middle of the road aperture and the sync speed for shutter speed (probably 1/200th or 1/250th). The point ...


19

In addition to Saaru's good answer, I wanted to point out that the reason you might have been switching around the ISO setting and not really noticing much difference is because film has reasonably good exposure latitude, and images can be "recovered" with some success from underexposed and overexposed film. Probably the machines/operators at the ...


17

Being a man of science, I did some scholar-googling and came across some articles. Too long, didn't read: None of the scientific articles I found give a clear definition of "high ISO". However, they all link high ISO with higher noise levels. Therefore, I would say that high ISO is completely dependent on subjective criteria and the camera in question. My ...


17

Your camera "thought" it had film with an ISO of 400, while in reality it was only 160. So it adjusted it's exposure meter for ISO 400 film, underexposing your film by a bit more than 1 stop. To compensate for this underexposure you need to ask the lab to "overdevelop" your film by 1 1/3 to 1 1/2 stops. This is called push processing. I have no experience ...


15

The base ISO of all Canon cameras is ISO 100. This is the ISO with the lowest gain, without any in-camera magickry to achieve the setting (like ISO 50, which mucks with the actual exposure settings behind the scenes). There is a lot of conjecture and misunderstanding about Canon's ISO settings because they use a "real/push/pull" model for ISO settings, ...


15

You misunderstand how exposure compensation works. Exposure compensation is not an actual physical thing the camera uses to control light - there are only 3 real things that control the amount of light: Aperture, Shutter speed and ISO. Exposure compensation is a way to tell the camera in one of the auto/semi-auto modes you want to override the light meter ...


15

How to disassemble / take apart Fujifilm X-T1 and how to disable ISO Dial lock switch. It is relatively easy to take apart FujiFilm X-T1. You only need one type of screwdriver, although the screws themselves are different. So as usual, make sure to have several small containers and a piece of paper to write down/draw where a particular screw came from. It ...


14

The concept of light sensitivity is related to speed in that a faster film (higher ISO value) requires less time exposed to light than a slower film (lower ISO value) for a single exposure. Fast film achieves this by having larger crystals of silver salts than slower film, thus collecting more light and creating larger "grain". "ISO speed" might better be ...


13

There is another alternative: Use two polarizing filters, one on the lens and one on the flash, and rotate one of them by 90 degrees. The directly reflected light is polarized, and the flash reflection should be nearly cancelled out, where as your target produces a diffuse, non polarized reflection of the flash-light, which passes the filter on the lens. It'...


13

I can't think of any technical reason for this to be the case. Even assuming that he used the lens at 105mm, if he was more than 387 ft from the closest object in the frame, he could have focused at 750 feet and had everything in focus even at f/5.6, so f/22 was completely unnecessary unless intending to get the shutter speed longer. A faster shutter speed ...


13

Is there any reason to change the ISO manually, rather than have it set automatically? The primary reason to set ISO, along with shutter time and aperture, manually would be to totally control exposure manually rather than let the camera set exposure. Not every scene needs to be rendered with an overall average brightness of medium gray. Left to its own ...


12

Sports photography usually require two things: a long focal length and a wide aperture. The long lens is required to shoot action a long way away. The wide aperture is used for two purposes: Letting in enough light (it won't always be bright sunshine; weather, being indoors and daylight will affect the amount of natural light available to you) so you can ...


12

Selecting an appropriate aperture When shooting sports in low light you're not going to be able to shoot at f/11. Most of us use f/2.8 lenses and shoot wide open. We do this not only because it helps isolate our subject(s) from backgrounds that are often cluttered but also because we need the "speed" of the wide aperture to allow a fast enough shutter speed....


11

If you're are talking about the range of ISO sensitivities available then it's simply a choice by camera manufacturers about how much gain (amplification) is applied to the sensor data. The highest settings are usually implemented in software by just doubling all the numbers after analogue to digital conversion, so it's entirely arbitrary how high they can ...


11

The long exposure Noise Reduction takes a "dark frame" after the real shot, and then uses the noise pattern from that image to reduce the noise generated by the sensor. That's why the exposure takes twice as long as this NR were disabled. Long time exposure can increase the sensor temperature, and increased temperature also means more noise. So you should ...


11

You apparently have Highlight Correction activated. This forces the higher ISO limit (usually forcing it from 100 to 200, though you also have Expanded Sensitivity enabled, which gives you a broader ISO range starting at 80, thus now 160). So, there's nothing wrong with your camera. Mind you: Options you find that look superior may come with a downside. ...


11

Your camera saves this information, which we call "metadata" (because it is data about the data captured in the photo itself — one level beyond, or meta), in every file. There are many utilities which can read and display this. I'm not aware of any software designed for photography which doesn't — that'd include Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Picassa, and ...


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