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44

The reason you can see such a large dynamic range isn't that the eye, as an optical device, can actually capture such a range - the reason is that your brain can combine information from lots and lots of "exposures" from the eyes and create an HDR panorama of the scene in front of you. The eye is pretty poor from an image quality standpoint but it has a ...


37

This is a very good question, and the answer could fill hundreds of pages - and, in fact, the answer already DOES fill hundreds of pages. The short answer is that the figures you are citing to not agree with apparent reality because the commonly quoted figures are wrong :-). Read on ... Much is available on the internet on this subject and the quality is, ...


37

The Black Card Technique is a workaround for the problem of the limited dynamic range of digital cameras. The dynamic range of a camera describes the difference in light levels it can record. The limits of dynamic range are often seen in landscape photography - you will often see photos where the sky is nicely exposed, but the ground is underexposed, or ...


29

Exposure fusion is a process that takes multiple images and combines them to create a single image while only keeping the properly exposed elements. In contrast to HDR images, exposure fusion is more basic, gives a more realistic effect, and requires fewer steps. The exposure fusion(fusion, or EF) process takes each individual pixel and assigns a weight to ...


29

That's a nice silhouette! You're running into the same problem that anyone runs into when photographing a very backlit subject: a lot of light is coming from the background and creating a drastic difference in ideal exposure between the background and foreground. Given this, you can handle the situation a number of different ways: Change the Exposure to ...


27

Any camera is going to struggle with the dynamic range of that sort of situation. Very hard to get the room and the outside both exposed reasonably at the same time. With enough flash power you can do it by flooding the room with light I suppose. But the easier way is to use a tripod and take two exposures, one for the inside and one for out, and blend ...


27

Such a thing is seemingly impossible with a traditional camera. I disagree with the premise of your question. People take well-exposed photos that include the sun with DSLR's all the time. If you're using a very wide angle lens outdoors, you may not be able to avoid having the sun in the frame. And yet, there are still plenty of blue sky images. Here's just ...


21

The size of the sensor does not matter, it is the size of the pixel. Having that said, bigger sensors like in full frame cameras tend to have bigger pixels. You can estimate the size of the pixel by taking the size of the sensor and divide it by the number of pixels. This calculation is not accurate because most sensors have gaps between the pixels and ...


21

DXO I addition to some of the excellent answers that have already been provided, I'd like to add a small word of caution about DXO's dynamic range numbers. First off, Dynamic Range as defined by DXO is officially the ratio between the saturation point and the RMS of read noise. That is a little different than the ratio between the brightest pixels and the ...


21

That description only represents the "base setting", or "N" exposure, of the Zone System. The idea that the Zone System revolves around 10 exposure steps is a vast oversimplification. There are, indeed, 10 (or, actually, 11) "zones", or major tonal values in the print, ranging from effectively unexposed white paper (at Zone X) to the paper's Dmax at Zone 0. ...


20

There are already camera's with DR larger than the human eye, both instantly and overall. The human eye's dynamic range is not as large as most people tend to think it is. As I recall, it is somewhere around 12 to 16 EVs, which is right around the level of a modern DSLR. The primary difference is that we have extremely natural aperture control that will ...


19

In the immortal words of the late National Geographic photo editor Bob Gilka, "Kid, if you want to be a better photographer, you're going to have to stand in front of more interesting stuff." That said, welcome to the sometimes not-so-wonderful world of the commercial/industrial photographer. As often as not, making a dramatic, exciting picture of something ...


19

It's been done in X-rays. The TimePix is a 256x256 detector. It has three operating modes: the usual "total energy in this pixel since we started integrating"; Time-over-Threshold (TOT): the detected pulse height is recorded in the pixel counter in the TOT mode; and Time-of-Arrival (TOA): the TOA mode measures time between trigger and arrival of the ...


18

You are missing some obvious problems with this idea. You want to "continously" capture the light data, but that's already being done. Apparently you mean to have a series of images available after the exposure, each exposed from the start to times advancing withing the whole exposure. The later images would have more detail in shadow areas, but might ...


18

What exactly limits modern digital camera sensors in capturing light intensity beyond certain point? In terms of the physical properties of the sensor itself: The number of photon strikes and the number of free electrons resulting from such photon strikes until there are no more available electrons with the potential to be freed within each photosite (a/k/...


17

Dynamic range is not measured in f-stops, it is measured in stops. A stop is often used to refer to a change that doubles the value or, in the case of cameras, the amount of light. Changing the aperture by one f-stop doubles to amount of light allowed in, so in the case of aperture, a stop is an f-stop. Similarly, cutting the shutter speed in half is a ...


17

This is the situation when you use fill-flash. Contrary to common belief, flash is NOT to be used in darkness. In darkness flash lights up the foreground and leaves background pitch black. Flash is best used to outshine bright light you can't control (like sun) so you can bring dark foreground up to bright background. This will most likely create white ...


16

How can I make my shots look like this one? I added an emphasis to the question you asked, which is pretty much the answer: You make an image like that. There's no way your camera will produce an image like that directly. No matter what settings you dial in. You have to apply some heavy post processing to get an image like that, the steps are usually: The ...


15

HDR Flash fill such that flash deals with inside view and ambient deals with exterior. Juggle to suit. See photo example below. Long exposure with a manually moved mask between light and dark to balance exposures. There is a whole art-form based around doing this. Multiple exposures and manual combining. Can be reasonably easy with tripod due to sharply ...


15

The particulars will be different due to the increased capacity of modern cameras and typical display devices (A good LCD monitor has a slightly wider dynamic range than the photo papers Adams used and those we use today, for instance), but the basic concept remains the same: Divide the available dynamic range for your scene (within the limits of your ...


14

It makes some measurable difference but does not tell the whole story. DxOMark's portrait score is a technical assessment of the output of various cameras specifically in terms of color depth, which they carefully describe as having a "correlation" with color sensitivity, which is the actual nuance in color. If you look at the results of that metric, you ...


13

Why don't cameras show a histogram based on the RAW data rather than on the JPG preview? My notion is this: Because it would not be useful, because raw images don't yet have white balance in them, but the JPG images do have WB. For example, Daylight white balance will shift the red channel substantially higher, and the blue channel substantially lower. ...


12

More bits usually doesn't mean more range, but more precision. That is to say, the ends of the scales, the blackest blacks and whitest whites, will stay where they are (at 0 and the max value) but the number of values between them will be greater with more bits. You quickly fall into diminishing returns here as there simply is no need for that much ...


12

Yes, the evidence that this is a fact is that RAW images are used to make the JPEGs. It isn't possible for a JPEG to have a wider range than a RAW image because the RAW image is the actual sensor data from which the JPEG is made. A JPEG is the processed image produced by the camera taking its best guess at how the image should be processed. It discards ...


12

Changing the exposure compensation or using manual exposure can brighten your subject, but it will also make the sky brighter. Too bright to see the effect of the sunset. You can't change the laws of physics or the physical properties of light. Sunset means darkness and you must provide more light for your foreground subject. This is even more critical ...


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