20

Do whatever gives you the best results, don't worry about what may or may not be acceptable to others. I'd say shooting events fully manual is rare these days, though you might want to explore the aperture-priority and shutter-priority modes, each of which are very good for certain situations. I'd also investigate auto-ISO if your camera offers it. My ...


16

It sounds like you don't understand exposure. If you change to an all manual mode, then its expecting you to adjust shutter speed, aperture, and ISO all in concert - 'manually'. If you set a faster shutter speed, you'll need to raise your ISO or open your aperture more to adjust for the fact that you're letting in less light. The same with a lower shutter ...


15

Sadly, the feature's name is misleading. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that it's wrong, if not an outright lie. Turning this option on just enables you to use exposure compensation — it doesn't let you do anything actually "manual". If you enable this option, the ... menu at the lower right of the screen gains a +/- icon, as typically indicates exposure ...


15

Your question is based upon an assumption that is not entirely correct: that you can change just about everything in any shot you take. You can't. Things such as depth of field and shutter speed are set at the time the picture is taken. If, for example, the shutter speed is too slow to freeze a moving subject there is absolutely nothing you can do in post ...


15

I can't speak for all manufacturers, but can answer your point 2. Canon does. Their higher end models on the top mode wheel (e.g. auto, P, aperture priority/shutter speed priority and manual etc), also have from one to three C modes. These allow you to register and save settings, be it shooting mode (manual, aperture priority etc) down to their relevant ...


14

This question tells me you should start by understanding exposure first. Start with reading about the Exposure-Triangle. If you understand that, you would not be asking this :) Briefly, exposure is determined by 3 parameters: ISO, Shutter-Speed and Aperture. When you are in manual mode and set all these, that is it. No further adjust is possible or needed. ...


14

Obviously, there was still way too much light getting onto your sensor despite the tiny aperture. Methods to avoid that: First, make sure your ISO setting is as low as possible. Use Tv (shutter priority) mode instead of manual, then choose the shutter speed you want and let the camera adjust everything else to get normal exposure. If that is not possible (...


14

I gather from the aspect ratios (top one is 3:2, bottom one is 4:3), that the top image is the dSLR one, and the bottom image is the one from your TZ40. And at web sizes, while there's some improvement in image quality with the dSLR, it's not a huge amount better, and some could be compensated for with post-processing, rather than using straight-from-the-...


14

No, it is not normal. One thing that Manual mode is used for is to take multiple photographs with the same exposure parameters which is very useful in many situations. There are a few cases where it may happen though. If you are bracketing for exposure, then one of the exposure-parameters, usually shutter-speed, is changed between frames until the bracket is ...


12

Auto mode is auto exposure, and it also always uses auto White Balance and auto ISO, which cannot be turned off in Auto mode. Auto mode is "auto everything". The A,S,P,M modes only set exposure, but can also use these Auto WB and Auto ISO if you enable them, however they can also be turned off. Probably are not on by default. This can make a big difference,...


12

It's not so much that manual is better, but that manual is more controlled. Shooting all the time on full manual will teach you what to do & what not to do. It will take longer & you will probably have far fewer keepers to start with, but you will learn as you go. If you are shooting full manual, you have to balance up the depth of field you need - ...


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


10

Here's a secret: nobody actually cares what mode you were shooting in so long as the quality is good. (Equally, nobody cares what gear you're using either). Therefore if you get good quality shots in program mode, full auto or anything else, go for it. That said, program mode does take away a significant amount of your artistic control - did you want the ...


10

This is actually a characteristic of the leaf shutter used in Fuji's X10/X20/X30 and X100 cameras. The leaf shutter can only travel so quickly. The wider the aperture is open, the slower the shutter speed has to be to accommodate the operation speed of the leaf shutter. It's a mechanical limit. In M and shutter priority modes, Fuji is allowing the faster ...


9

Like the other answerers have noted, it's not at all obvious which picture is taken with a DSLR — both have some pretty obvious issues, like blown highlights and poor contrast. Rather than enumerating the problems, let me offer a few tips for you and your friend on shooting scenes like this: If in doubt, always underexpose. This goes especially for ...


8

For an image taken with a digital camera this information is stored and very easily accessible. What mode the camera was in such as Auto, Manual, Program, Aperture Priority, or Shutter Priority and more information can be found using the EXIF data that is stored along with the image. It is all included in the image file such as a .JPEG file in what we call ...


8

Exposure is defined as the total quantity of light that hits the film or sensor during the time the shutter is open. Exposure compensation in Tv or Av modes will change the shutter speed or aperture, which in turn changes the total amount of light that hits the sensor, i.e. it changes the exposure. When shooting in manual mode the aperture and shutter ...


8

You're almost certainly doing something wrong. If you're truly in manual mode - i.e. the mode dial is set to the "M" position - then the aperture won't (normally) change in response to other settings. You change the shutter speed by turning the command dial normally, and you change the aperture by holding down the exposure compensation button (the "+/-" ...


7

Most digital cameras include the shooting mode, the metering mode, and even the focus mode in the EXIF information. The EXIF information can be viewed with most photo processing applications such as Adobe Lightroom or the software that came with the camera. Not all applications will display every field of the EXIF data, so you may need to try more than one. ...


7

Setting the dial to M only affects the camera's exposure mode but does not tell the camera to also use manual flash mode any more than it tells the camera to use manual focusing mode. There are a couple of other options you need to check that could be causing the camera to emit the pre-flash. Red-eye reduction. The camera fires a pre-flash to try and induce ...


7

If you are using an automatic exposure mode (e.g. Program mode, Aperture or Shutter-priority) then dialing in +/- exposure compensation tells the metering system to adjust the exposure up or down. Otherwise it will always attempt to produce the same exposure for the same scene. If you are in Manual mode, then you accomplish the same thing by simply ...


7

The Live View screen will by default try to 'mimic' the exposure you're likely to get with the settings you have dialled in. So in dim light with ISO 100, a fast shutter speed, and a small aperture, you will likely just see a black screen. When you half press the shutter the camera brightens it up while it meters the scene and so you can see what you're ...


7

To be honest, I couldn't easily guess which is which when viewed at the default 600-pixel-wide size above. Both handle the dynamic range of the clouds pretty poorly, with the lower image being a little less bad. Looking more closely, the top image has significantly more detail in the trees — but still isn't astounding. (Both are subject to very high JPEG ...


7

This is a very common issue with the 5D series. You have accidentally locked the rear control-dial. The power-switch next to it has actually 3 positions. When lined up with On, the camera is on but the rear control-dial is disabled. When lined up with the white line which goes to that dial, the camera is on and the dial is enabled.


7

No. The incremental cost in actually providing modern features including priority and program modes is very, very small — but the reduction in potential market would be enormous. Because of this, such a camera would probably be more expensive than cameras with features made for the mass market — including higher-end models aimed at enthusiasts and working-...


7

No. This sort of feature is available on higher level Canon cameras where you can have one or more sets of "custom settings", but not on an entry level camera like the 1300D.


7

Basically, no-one on earth can hold a camera still for 15 seconds. Most people struggle at anything over 100th of a second. If you need exposures at that kind of length a tripod is essential - or a wall, or a bean-bag, or something so you're not holding it. Even at that, open your aperture as far as it will go, because celestial bodies move relative to ...


7

I have a home office with a large window that faces south (towards the sun in the Northern Hemisphere), so it is a very well lit room during the day time. I just followed your instructions with my Nikon D7500: Set to Manual mode (M) ISO set to 1600 Aperture f5.6 Exposure compensation set to "0" Shutter adjusted so the exposure meter in the viewfinder was ...


6

No. As far as exposure value goes, an f-stop is an f-stop. It's only where depth of field is concerned (and noise calculations derived from "total light captured", if you're the type who has to go there) that you need to think about equivalent f-stops. So if you are reading 1/250 at f/4, set your camera to 1/250 at f/4. That will give you a correctly-...


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