20

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


19

Your camera's light meter can't tell the difference between a black cat in a coal mine and a white cat in a snowstorm. It assumes everything you point your camera at is somewhere about halfway in between those extremes. That's why the best card to use to set exposure is a grey card. Unless you tell it otherwise, many cameras will try to expose whatever you ...


17

That is an incident light meter. It's used in both motion and still photography, although with modern cameras the built-in light meter is usually so good (and so convenient) that separate meters are not as essential as they once were. There is a difference, though, because a camera's built-in meter measures light reflected back to the camera, whereas this ...


16

There are two basic possibilities. First, and probably the biggest: the metering takes into account more of the scene with the wider angle, and the scene is different enough that the exposure choice is correspondingly different. This is particularly likely to be the case if there are actual light sources or shadow areas in the scene. You don't mention what ...


13

In theory, this should work perfectly. The combination of (shutter speed, aperture, ISO) determines the amount of light which falls on the sensor (per unit area), so should be transferable between devices. In practice, there are a couple of things which mean it might not quite work: If you're doing long exposures with film, reciprocity failure means that ...


12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


11

At the end of the day you are the photographer and your photo is an expression of your vision. If you prefer the final image under or overexposed, then that is your choice. As long as you are not a photojournalist, then you are an artist -- do what makes you happy. Journalists should play by stricter rules and should not turn day into night or vice versa, ...


10

It sound like your camera is locking the exposure in addition to the focus when you perform a half shutter press. This would explain the overexposure when moving from a dark river to the bright sky: the camera is set to expose a dark scene properly, but it then gets pointed at a brighter scene, and subsequently over exposes. The converse is true as well, ...


10

In my experience my camera metering will overexpose everything once it gets darker. There are a number of things you can do about that: Make sure the meter is looking at the part of the scene that you're most interested in, not the whole scene. To do that, switch your camera to the spot-metering mode, so that the meter only looks at a small part of the ...


8

Ok time to cut through a little of the confusion: Technically there should be no difference in exposure when using a smaller aperture in one of the automatic modes as the camera should vary the other parameters to compensate. You might see a difference in the extreme corners due to vignetting at wide apertures, but this would make the small aperture shot ...


8

The exposure value (EV) is usually defined as where N is the relative aperture (f-number) t is the exposure time (“shutter speed”) in seconds This means that EV 0 equals an aperture of f/1.0 and a shutter speed of 1 second. If you increase the aperture by the square root of 2 or decrease the shutter speed by a factor 2 you increase the exposure value to ...


8

Disclosure: I'm the guy behind Cine Meter and Cine Meter II, so take what I say with a grain of salt, grin. Do these apps really work, or are they gimmicks? They really work, within the limits of what the built-in camera allows. They may not be able to measure really dim light, for example. Can they get the same information from a scene that a real ...


8

To a very good approximation: yes, assuming you've done the obvious and set your DSLR ISO to whatever film speed you're using. The definition of "ISO" is the same for film and for digital. There are a number of reasons why you might not get exactly the same exposure between the digital and film setups: ISO 200 (or whatever you're using) might not be ...


8

If as you say the background has been setup before the shoot then best practice would be to shoot in manual mode and take a few test exposures to confirm your settings. Using the camera histogram is far more accurate than any of the metering modes.


8

That is an auto-focus assist light shone by another photo camera that is left from the video camera. This link explains how this light works on Nikon DSLR cameras. As far as I know it is similar to other camera and flash brands.


8

Even in theory there are differences in the way digital sensors and films record light that makes ISO values only approximate. But these differences are usually fairly subtle and theoretically exposure should be more or less equal if you use the same ISO, aperture, and shutter time. For more about this, please see: Why are these film photos brighter than ...


8

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? Metering, regardless of type, and exposure compensation are different functions with different purposes. Metering is used to obtain exposure exposure settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed), while exposure compensation is used to modify those values. It is basically the difference between nouns and adjectives. ...


7

Most if not all fixed lens camera do not have any such sensor. They only have the imaging sensor which is read continuously to give the preview image. At the same time, part of that data is used to meter, compute white-balance, compute a live-histogram (optionally) and focus (by measuring contrast between adjacent pixels). In other words, the imaging sensor ...


7

You can get a flash meter, which works just like a light meter but detects flash pulses. Alternatively film photographers used to use Polaroids to check both the exposure and the general effect of the lighting setup. A cheap digicam with manual settings would be the modern equivalent of this.


7

Different types of cameras do it slightly differently, but even more significantly each camera will do it radically differently depending on which metering mode you have selected. Spot metering. In the Canon realm, most DSLRs with spot metering capability use between 2-4% of the center of the frame and expose the average of that area as if it were 18% grey. ...


7

Gray is used because it's indifferent to differences in color temperature. If you used an 18% red card in the shade, the cooler light would make the red card be a biased measurement standard. The same thing would happen if you used a blue card in tungsten lighting- the lack of blue light frequencies would make it appear darker. With a gray card, such ...


7

Easiest fix Only shoot the bird when the sun is at your back, not behind the bird. Given how redtails circle where I am, I sometimes just wait as I draw a bead and follow them around the circle, to where the light is falling on them nicely. However. This will be rarer than backlit opportunities, because a hunting hawk doesn't like to fly into the light ...


6

Your issue is related to the dynamic range of your camera. The sensor of a camera cannot capture such as wide variety of tones as your eyes, the range between absolutely white and absolutely black is much more reduced than the one you can see when you look at the waterfall scene. There is not much you can do about this, as it depends on your camera and in ...


6

First - when you take a picture of a large dynamic range scene, not just portraits, and your camera cannot cover this dynamic range you'll either get overexposure of the bright parts or underexposed of the dark parts. There are some ways to workaround this: Shoot the portrait on a different background. Shoot HDR: I don't like this method for portraits, ...


6

It would take a rather brightly lit room to get your ISO down that low. I've got a low hanging, 5 light fixture in a small white room and I just metered f/3.2, 1/60 and ISO 1250. So, bright sun is definitely going to help, but ISO 200 or 100 inside, at f/3.2, without flash is an impossible dream. You either need a faster lens (like a f/1.4) - but that is ...


6

Yes and no. If you are using a light meter, then you will never use the exposure compensation because you are setting the exposure manually. However, just because you measure the incoming light instead of the reflected light, that doesn't mean that every scene can be exposed only based on what the meter says. Instead of being fooled by how much light the ...


6

Lightmeters are superior to in camera metering because they are able to measure the incident light, not just the light reflected off the subject. Reflected light metering is less accurate as the camera/meter has no way of telling the difference between a white cat that is massively underexposed and a black cat that is correctly exposed. With incident ...


6

When we talk about flash photography; this is because the shutter speed does not contribute to the exposure from the flash. A flash will output a burst which last maybe 1/1000s, so changing the shutter speed won't affect the exposure from the flash but form the other continuous light sources. And since the light meter used in the first video you linked ...


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