20

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


19

Your camera's light meter can't tell the difference between a black cat in a coal mine and a white cat in a snowstorm. It assumes everything you point your camera at is somewhere about halfway in between those extremes. That's why the best card to use to set exposure is a grey card. Unless you tell it otherwise, many cameras will try to expose whatever you ...


17

That is an incident light meter. It's used in both motion and still photography, although with modern cameras the built-in light meter is usually so good (and so convenient) that separate meters are not as essential as they once were. There is a difference, though, because a camera's built-in meter measures light reflected back to the camera, whereas this ...


16

There are two basic possibilities. First, and probably the biggest: the metering takes into account more of the scene with the wider angle, and the scene is different enough that the exposure choice is correspondingly different. This is particularly likely to be the case if there are actual light sources or shadow areas in the scene. You don't mention what ...


14

Overview In general, the workflow goes like this: Choose metering area Adjust and meter Retain the metering Compose, focus and shoot Since there are so many steps, spot metering tends to work better for planned shots, although it can perform quite fast when linked with AF point (details under "Adjusting and metering"). For rapid shooting in changing light,...


14

Apparently no one has mentioned the reciprocity error (Schwarzschild effect) when measuring for film, and it's probably the only things OP should be concerned about. You see, the response of the digital sensors was designed from the film response in the 1/10000 - 1" range, which was applied lineally to the rest of the range. In digital, to get an extra ...


13

In theory, this should work perfectly. The combination of (shutter speed, aperture, ISO) determines the amount of light which falls on the sensor (per unit area), so should be transferable between devices. In practice, there are a couple of things which mean it might not quite work: If you're doing long exposures with film, reciprocity failure means that ...


12

The way TTL works is to measure the exposure of the scene when the aperture of the lens is wide open, and then when the picture is taken, it stops down to the correct aperture. With a manual lens, oftentimes you have manually stopped the lens down already to the aperture you want, or because that is where the exposure reading is telling you it is correct. ...


12

We know that for any scene (really, any light meter measurement) of a particular brightness (and particular sensor sensitivity) there is usually more than one "correct" set of shutter speed and aperture settings. A scene that wants f5.6 and 1/125 will also be correctly exposed at f4.0 and 1/250 and so on. EV numbers are a way to express the brightness of a ...


12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


11

At the end of the day you are the photographer and your photo is an expression of your vision. If you prefer the final image under or overexposed, then that is your choice. As long as you are not a photojournalist, then you are an artist -- do what makes you happy. Journalists should play by stricter rules and should not turn day into night or vice versa, ...


10

With spot metering, the camera will only measure a very small area of the scene (between 1-5% of the viewfinder area). Metering Mode This means you could get a light reading for a very specific area in the frame as opposed to a general measurement for the overall picture. Using this built in meter you can tell specifically how your subject will be ...


10

AE Lock is for situations where you want to use metered exposure later than you metered it: locking exposure capturing parts of a panorama - for seamless stitching, frames with similar exposure will work better than differently exposed ones; when you meter from a gray card, lock exposure, then remove the gray card and compose; you point your camera on a ...


10

It sound like your camera is locking the exposure in addition to the focus when you perform a half shutter press. This would explain the overexposure when moving from a dark river to the bright sky: the camera is set to expose a dark scene properly, but it then gets pointed at a brighter scene, and subsequently over exposes. The converse is true as well, ...


10

In my experience my camera metering will overexpose everything once it gets darker. There are a number of things you can do about that: Make sure the meter is looking at the part of the scene that you're most interested in, not the whole scene. To do that, switch your camera to the spot-metering mode, so that the meter only looks at a small part of the ...


9

I've used Pocket Light Meter for the iPhone (like dpollitt :) when using my grandfather's old Leica IIIc, a 35mm rangefinder with no light meter or automatic metering. I played around with it quite a lot, comparing its results against those of my Canon 5DmkII's metering, and found it to be very accurate. The results from the Leica bore this out too: ...


9

Yes. Spot metering gives you 18% grey. Each stop below that halves the reflectance. The number of stops to dial-in depends on how close to black you want the result and the dynamic range of your camera. With a perfect noiseless exposure, -1 EV would give you 9%, -2 would give 4.5%, -3 would be 2.25%, etc. As you can imagine, most cameras are not perfect ...


9

I think the article is referring to using the histogram to judge exposure, after a test shot has been taken. Using the histogram as a guide you can increase exposure until the top of the histogram hits the right edge, indicating clipping may start happening. If you have to rely on the in camera metering (which will meter assuming 18% reflectance as you ...


8

The basic principle of spot metering (when compared to matrix metering) is that it loses the comfort of having camera guess how should different parts of scene contribute towards exposure settings and gives that control to you. Therefore, situations favoring spot metering are when you want precise control over what part of the scene exposure is measured by. ...


8

A light meter is a device that measures light. There are two types of light meters: Incident light meter: Measures light falling on the meter itself. Those are characterized by a dome-like shape which is used to average incoming light. Reflected light meter: Measures light being reflected from an object towards the light meter. All digital cameras have a ...


8

Disclosure: I'm the guy behind Cine Meter and Cine Meter II, so take what I say with a grain of salt, grin. Do these apps really work, or are they gimmicks? They really work, within the limits of what the built-in camera allows. They may not be able to measure really dim light, for example. Can they get the same information from a scene that a real ...


8

Ok time to cut through a little of the confusion: Technically there should be no difference in exposure when using a smaller aperture in one of the automatic modes as the camera should vary the other parameters to compensate. You might see a difference in the extreme corners due to vignetting at wide apertures, but this would make the small aperture shot ...


8

To a very good approximation: yes, assuming you've done the obvious and set your DSLR ISO to whatever film speed you're using. The definition of "ISO" is the same for film and for digital. There are a number of reasons why you might not get exactly the same exposure between the digital and film setups: ISO 200 (or whatever you're using) might not be ...


8

If as you say the background has been setup before the shoot then best practice would be to shoot in manual mode and take a few test exposures to confirm your settings. Using the camera histogram is far more accurate than any of the metering modes.


8

That is an auto-focus assist light shone by another photo camera that is left from the video camera. This link explains how this light works on Nikon DSLR cameras. As far as I know it is similar to other camera and flash brands.


8

Even in theory there are differences in the way digital sensors and films record light that makes ISO values only approximate. But these differences are usually fairly subtle and theoretically exposure should be more or less equal if you use the same ISO, aperture, and shutter time. For more about this, please see: Why are these film photos brighter than ...


7

The exposure value (EV) is usually defined as where N is the relative aperture (f-number) t is the exposure time (“shutter speed”) in seconds This means that EV 0 equals an aperture of f/1.0 and a shutter speed of 1 second. If you increase the aperture by the square root of 2 or decrease the shutter speed by a factor 2 you increase the exposure value to ...


7

The question was how to meter, not how to eyeball the histogram or guesstimate from guide numbers. I mean no offense to those who answered this way. Just that the original question had specifically to do with metering. As far as I know, the most reliable way to meter a flash is to trigger it from an incident flash meter. You can then know exactly how much ...


7

Most if not all fixed lens camera do not have any such sensor. They only have the imaging sensor which is read continuously to give the preview image. At the same time, part of that data is used to meter, compute white-balance, compute a live-histogram (optionally) and focus (by measuring contrast between adjacent pixels). In other words, the imaging sensor ...


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