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43

@Michael Clark and @Itai have provided good answers. A few more thoughts from the perspective of the enthusiastic amateur: Tracking technology isn't perfect and sometimes its better to work within the practical limitations of the tracking available rather than push it too far Very long exposures may not play well with high levels of light pollution. There's ...


34

It looks like there are parallel light trails below each streelamp -- going down, then right, then down some more (ASCII art): / | | | \_ \ | And highlighted on the original: I would guess that these are when the shutter button was pressed, tilting the camera, because only bright sources show this effect. This is in addition to the normal, more ...


31

The light you describe as "green" also contains components of "red" and "blue" light. They are much weaker than the green component, but they are there. Once the exposure is bright enough for the green channel to be fully saturated, increasing the exposure further can not increase the value recorded in the green channel to more than 100%. If green is fully ...


27

You could've probably got a decent result just by picking an intermediate exposure. Alternatively, you can try to take a short and a long exposure of the same scene, and combine them digitally afterwards. Here's what I got just by taking your two images above (mouse cursor and all), aligning them (manually, using the Scale tool in GIMP) and blending them ...


22

With regard to reasonably bright stellar objects: technically, yes. With regard to dimmer objects like those that make up most of what we mean when we say "The Milky Way": practically speaking, no. In addition to the phase of the Moon, which determines the overall amount of light falling on the atmosphere above a specific location on the Earth's surface, ...


18

It is firstly because we can now. Bulb photography can indeed shoot exposures of minutes to several hours, depending on the camera. Using a film camera, astrophotography is done with very long exposures and those cameras have no time limit since they do not need power to operate. A digital camera can be used in the same way but most mirrorless limit bulb ...


18

The main advantage of stacking is to average out the randomized Poisson distribution "shot noise" that can be a problem in low light images such as astrophotography. Another advantage for stacking comes in using dedicated monochrome imaging sensors while alternating color (or specialized astronomy related) filters over the entire sensor for each exposure and ...


16

I see two main problems: Too slow shutter speed. Overexposure. The first goes directly to the issue you ask about. You are stuck with whatever lighting there is, so you can only trade off ISO, shutter speed, and f-stop (short of using a different camera with a more sensitive sensor). You did a good job of following the motion. That's why the car looks ...


13

The problem with fast wide angle lenses is that a fast lens by definition has a large entrance pupil, and to illuminate the image plane the entrance pupil has to be visible across the field of view. So a combination of wide aperture and wide field of view is very difficult to achieve. In addition wide angle lenses for digital cameras are often retrofocus ...


13

Photographing Milky way while a full moon is up? No. Can't be done. Photographing other stellar objects then? Yes, with reservations. The problem is the amount of particles in atmosphere. Air pollution, dust and water/humidity. Particles in air reflect the light from moon practically blanketing the whole sky with thin haze. Quite similar to what light ...


12

I already have a Nikon D5200 and I I tried so much to get a clear view of the sky and it didn't work so much. The camera you have is a fine one to start with. You should spend some time working on technique before you worry about switching to a different camera. Astrophotography is all about capturing tiny amounts of light compared to daytime photography, ...


11

There's already something that has been invented to collect light for photographs. We call them lenses. In order to collect more light, the front element of the lens must be larger for the same focal length, or have a wider angle of view for the same entrance pupil diameter.


10

Your question boils down to auto vs manual focus. From the methodology you've described, it seems that you are attempting to use autofocus to get a picture of the night sky. That's not a great plan because the objects your camera can focus on in the night sky are pretty small points of light, and autofocus usually only works well under brightly lit ...


9

The best time to shoot the supermoon is when you can really show off it's size. Shot solo, up alone in the sky, a supermoon doesn't look any different than any other moon. It lacks any dramatic comparisons to other objects of well-known size. You want to shoot a supermoon when it is lower in the atmosphere, and in proximity to foreground object, with the ...


9

Clearly there is some artificial light affecting the shot. Look at the top of the distant house too, and you'll see that it, also, has a red tint on the roof. And more importantly, there is a distinct shadow line on both the roof (from the roof next door) and on the trees (from the distant roof) that shows that the external source of light is coming in at ...


9

The dynamic range of cameras is limited and is unable to capture large brightness differences within one shot. For static subjects use Exposure Blending or HDR preferably on a tripod or similar stable base. For exposure blending you take multiple shots of the same composition but with different exposures. Those images then get merged together by using an ...


9

How annoying :-) - I finished marking up a photo and now see that Chris H has done much the same but better. So I'll post this 'for completeness' but with less comment than I otherwise would have. I saw a movement pattern similar to Chris's. This may have occurred in one motion, but the variable brightnesses along each path suggest it may have been a ...


9

The first thing you must realize is that what you are seeing on your monitor is not "the" raw file. What you are seeing is an 8-bit demosaiced preview conversion of the raw file created by Photoshop (or whatever other raw conversion application you are using) based on the current settings. It's just one of many possible interpretations of the full ...


8

The building did not become darker in the second picture, the colors are different but the brightness is about the same. There are two differences between the photos: White balance. The building is lit with somewhat yellow lights, in the 1st picture the camera compensates and makes the light white. For the second picture the flash's light is blue, the ...


8

Are those other planets or other stars? Or is that a lens effect? Looks to me like a planet and some moons. I don't know where you are, but Jupiter has been very bright in the night sky lately in my neighborhood, and with a long enough lens it's not hard to see some of its moons. Seen through a sufficiently powerful telescope, a planet looks very different ...


8

You're not going to get "color accurate" white balance at night. There's no way to make every object in the scene look the same color it would be if viewed under full spectrum daylight. This is because night scenes typically have a myriad of varying light sources in them. Those various sources are all different temperatures and have different amounts of the ...


8

Digital sensors heat up over long exposures; I've had exposures as short as 6 minutes exhibiting very visible colour distortion in the corners of the frame. Run the chip continually for hours without specialist cooling and the result would likely be an unusable mess.


7

I don't think this is a tripod stability problem. The star trails are all straight, not wiggly as they would be if the camera where moving during or between each exposure. The dimmer stars are easy to see as nine distinct dots. None of the dots indicate camera movement during any of the nine exposures, and none of the lines of the nine dots for each star are ...


7

See How does the colour of ambient lighting affect colour rendition?, because that question uses a sodium vapor light as an example. As the answers there explain, sodium vapor lights produce a very, very narrow spectrum of light: CC-BY-SA image from Wikimedia Commons, author Philips Lighting And in fact, this is effectively monochrome. Your only options ...


7

shined a light to focus on foreground beforehand If you focused on the foreground then the most likely explanation is that the stars are blurry because they are out of focus, at f/4 the depth of field is not sufficient to contain both the foreground and the stars (which are effectively at "infinity" or as far away as you can get). I would recommend you try ...


7

SImple answer: not to a measurable extent. Difficult answer: A high ISO-equivalent setting cranks the analog gain up. More gain requires more power per electron (or milliVolt if you prefer), but there's going to be far fewer electrons in each pixel bucket. A low ISO-equiv. setting will apply less gain to more electrons. That said, if you're in ...


7

Although the poster hasn't specified it, this answer assumes this picture was shot on a tripod (it looks too sharp to be hand-held, even holding the camera steady against the window). Many claimed that this is caused by a movement of the camera. However, I believe that it is actually due to the optical stabilization (IS in Canon parlance) trying to ...


7

Why is it that when the green channel clips, it turns into blue? Actually, it turns towards magenta. Look more closely at your picture. When green clips and the other two channels (red, blue) don't, the result is basically lowering green. Lowering green has the same effect on hue as raising red and blue. Red+blue is magenta, so lowering green by itself ...


7

As you edited your question it gives me more room. The same as a parabolic mic, any mirror lens do the exact same thing. It takes parallel rays coming from a distance, and focus them on a smaller spot... the focus point. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catadioptric_system#Photographic_catadioptric_lenses https://www.google.com/search?q=mirror+lens Ever heard ...


7

Would it be better for me to jump ship to Nikon and start from there or should I continue with Canon and use the few lenses I already own? You're putting the cart a bit before the horse. It would be better for you to stay with your current camera and lenses while you start learning photography in ernest. There's nothing about the EOS Rebel T3 and the ...


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