13

The sunny 16 rule explains that the proper exposure in non-obstructed sunlight traveling through minimal air mass is f/16, and shutter speed set to the reciprocal of ISO sensitivity. For example: If you want to use 1/200 s shutter speed because of the reason that it's the camera's fastest flash sync speed and you don't want to / can't use high speed sync, ...


12

It's not so much that manual is better, but that manual is more controlled. Shooting all the time on full manual will teach you what to do & what not to do. It will take longer & you will probably have far fewer keepers to start with, but you will learn as you go. If you are shooting full manual, you have to balance up the depth of field you need - ...


9

Assuming this is a single exposure, it must have been taken on the night side of the Earth, and the impression of daylight can be caused by the moon, like in those night time photos. Taking this ISS video as a reference, the relation of brightness of the nighttime earth surface, airglow, stars and ISS components, seems to be about right.


6

I don't think it's a great idea to be shooting in full manual. The same kind of people will tell you that auto focus is cheating... The semi auto modes allow you to control what you're interested in at that point. Aperture priority mode is a fantastic middle ground that gives you control of the depth of field, and the camera makes sure you get well exposed ...


5

Roll film box had instruction sheet and or this exposure aid was printed on the inside of the box.


5

Your first image is incredibly underexposed. Grainy + grey/lack of contrast on color negative films is the dead giveaway for underexposure. Your second image looks properly exposed and the color and contrast look to be what I'd expect with Portra 400 shot midday-ish in hard sun. I don't think there is a gear/film issue here. ISO400 film is not fast enough ...


4

Your question covers several aspects; I will try to answer them here. Your two problems are: The Sky is missing vibrant colors The foreground is too dark, almost black Let's start with the first problem. It is common for Out-of-camera sunrise or sunset photos not to look very colorful. This is because fo white balance. Basically, WB determines how warm or ...


4

Your question seems to be more related to image brightness when displayed rather than "exposure." This comes down to having a calibrated monitor and screen brightness appropriate for the ambient levels. A tool I use is a gamma test strip... I have it embedded into the Lightroom interface as the "identity plate." If I can't see the difference between the ...


4

It appears ( possibly, it is hard to tell ) to me that the leader is no longer smooth and has been hand cut. Sometimes I have film loaded in my camera of an ASA that is not right for the light that I find myself wanting to photograph in, so I rewind it back just enough to leave the leader out of the cassette. I may want to develop what I have shot on the ...


4

Just about all modern digital cameras automatically capture EXIF metadata in the image files they record; I can't think of a camera that doesn't. This EXIF data includes date & time of capture, camera model number, and most importantly, exposure settings — aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. There are a few cases where this can't be captured, but for most ...


4

It all depends on the situation and the style of photography you are into. My Opinion When I'm on holiday and I'm just taking generic landmark photos I'll keep my camera on aperture priority / automatic. Aperture priority is a nice middle ground where you can pick the idea DoF for the photo with the aperture & let the camera work out the rest. My ...


3

In general, Color Negative film is designed to be overexposed. Most can handle 1 stop over with no perceptible difference and things can look just fine up to +3 or +4 depending on the film. However, they can also start looking like garbage at as little as -1 under. This is why people say that it "likes to be shot at 200" - doing so forces you to be at ...


3

As others have said, digital sensors capture exposure values with a hard maximum value. When you reach that value, there is no nuance to a pixel at the maximum value. It's as bright as it can get. That's what "blown" means. There is no recovering blown out highlights. The whole blown out region reads the maximum brightness value. There is no data to recover. ...


3

The conjecture that you should use manual mode is based on the idea that your camera is not as good at doing the settings as you can be. This idea becomes less obvious, and true in less cases, as technology progresses, and automatic modes become cleverer and cleverer. It retains its plausibility, however, when considering that the most excellent settings are ...


3

You probably use a small aperture. When autofocus does its work, it usually does it with wide open aperture. That's why you get a brighter image for a small time. It says nothing about the brightness of the final image. This may be different when using phased-based autofocus and contrast-based autofocus, but this depends on what the camera does. Some ...


3

This happens because you are using a variable max aperture lens. The aperture iris is not actually opening or closing as you zoom out – its actual opening size is staying constant. It's just that the entrance pupil, the apparent size of the aperture opening when viewed through the front of the lens, is changing size due to the movements of the lens element ...


2

When you shoot a bird in flight, you are shooting a rather dark object(*) against a light background, so general exposure rules hardly apply. Using auto-exposure is better (this takes in account changes in orientation from the sun or passing clouds), but with a 200mm the bird must be a rather tiny part of the picture so the camera mostly exposes for the ...


2

Assuming the lens you are using fully communicates with your Nikon D5600, that information is already attached in the metadata to all of your image files when you transfer them from your camera to your computer. There are at least a couple of remote possibilities that would leave you without this information: You are using an older Nikon or adapted lens ...


2

Possible dumb question: because pushing takes place during development, is it impossible for the negatives to be pushed? Push processing must occur during development. Once film has been developed the process is irreversible. You can't go back, un-develop it and develop it again. Once you have a negative, processing is locked in and you can't push it. ...


2

With shooting a foreground and the sky, you've got a couple of choices: A) You can use multiple shots and then blend them together in post processing. A minimum would be two exposures - one to properly expose the foreground and one for the sky. That being said, if you're going to blend things, you may as well go big and start at a proper exposure for the ...


2

In properly exposed photographs, the only difference you (the viewer) should see is if something in the frame was in motion during the exposure. A sufficiently fast exposure will effectively freeze the object in motion. A longer exposure will blur the object.


2

I do a lot of technical imaging and I know about image noise. You question is to the point, let me give you a to the point answer. The difference in noise will probably be small and favorable in the short + bright exposure case. If I simplify a bit, noise basically comes from: noise related to the amount of photons of light captured during the acquisition (...


2

I tried some manual settings bit the pics look washed out, like the sky is white but then I can see the ground in color instead of black. I'm missing the right balance of settings. The dynamic range of the scenery exceeds what your camera can capture. Using manual settings will only allow you to find a compromise between sky and foreground, but will not ...


2

You are right, automatic mode will adjust some settings better than you can manually, for a simple reason: Your eyes are not good absolute light-meters. So, if you want to have correctly exposed pictures, you might have to take them twice (or more) to find the right settings if you start "out of the blue". However, I talk about semi-automatic mode (...


2

When recording raw files with linear gamma encoding it requires 1 bit/EV; so if recording in 8bit (256 values) then the max range would be 8EV. However, most cameras only record in 8bit when recording jpegs with a 2.2 gamma curve applied; 8bit with a 2.2 curve can display ~ 12EV/stops. And most cameras record raw files at either 12 or 14bit; so raw files can ...


2

Here's the frame challenge answer (https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem) You want increased contrast in the end result...this doesn't mean that you need increased contrast in the negative. The negative is simply a means to an end and it should give you the most detail possible so that you have the most amounts of "ends&...


2

When I take multiple images for an HDR image I prefer to take the different exposures manually instead of using auto bracketing. I always start with the highest exposure. The highest exposure should be a representation of the shadows. This does not mean that you have to listen to the light meter in your camera. It just means that the shadows should look like ...


2

It's the difference between the linear response of the digital sensor and the logarithmic response of human vision, which is taken into account by display devices such as monitors. An 18% grey card "properly" exposed is only RGB (127,127,127) after full gamma correction has been applied to the raw data. When using "log" recording, gamma ...


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