25

I understand that, on a digital camera, "exposure compensation" actually alters signal amplification, similar but not identical to changing the sensitivity. In general, this is not how the term is used. Instead, "exposure compensation" means: tell the camera's exposure program in automatic exposure modes to target an exposure brighter or darker than the ...


20

A digital sensor isn't really best described as "reading data". A much better way to describe it is "collecting photons" that are then converted into data by measuring the microscopic electrical charges they produce once the collection period is over. They do not have the capability to continuously record the changing state of each pixel well as they collect ...


15

This question tells me you should start by understanding exposure first. Start with reading about the Exposure-Triangle. If you understand that, you would not be asking this :) Briefly, exposure is determined by 3 parameters: ISO, Shutter-Speed and Aperture. When you are in manual mode and set all these, that is it. No further adjust is possible or needed. ...


15

You misunderstand how exposure compensation works. Exposure compensation is not an actual physical thing the camera uses to control light - there are only 3 real things that control the amount of light: Aperture, Shutter speed and ISO. Exposure compensation is a way to tell the camera in one of the auto/semi-auto modes you want to override the light meter ...


13

We already have some of the technology for this. Our term for remembering the sensor readings at each exposure point is "video", and what you are asking for is reconstruction of an optimal still image from multiple video frames. For an overview of Microsoft Research work on this, start here: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/...


13

It's not the case that "exposure compensation actually alters signal amplification". There are only 3 ways to control exposure: aperture, shutter speed and ISO. Exposure compensation is not a magical additional exposure control. It just tells the camera to change the exposure x number of stops by changing the aperture, the shutter speed or (in the case of a ...


12

In all of the semi-manual modes (aperture-priority, shutter-priority and program auto), you set one or more settings manually. The camera then chooses the rest of the parameters automatically to give you a nominally correct exposure. However, sometimes you want to override the camera's metering, either because it wouldn't correctly expose your subject or ...


12

Sports photography usually require two things: a long focal length and a wide aperture. The long lens is required to shoot action a long way away. The wide aperture is used for two purposes: Letting in enough light (it won't always be bright sunshine; weather, being indoors and daylight will affect the amount of natural light available to you) so you can ...


12

Selecting an appropriate aperture When shooting sports in low light you're not going to be able to shoot at f/11. Most of us use f/2.8 lenses and shoot wide open. We do this not only because it helps isolate our subject(s) from backgrounds that are often cluttered but also because we need the "speed" of the wide aperture to allow a fast enough shutter speed....


11

I was told it’s not good to use auto ISO If unqualified, whoever told you that is a fool. Auto ISO is a tool, and as with any other tool it can be used well and it can be used badly. Instead try to learn when auto ISO will do as well (or better) than setting it manually, and when you need to override the camera's decision.


11

It’s getting me the shot even though there is some noise This is the point. If your priority is getting the shot, why not. But if your priority is getting a printable photo (which is what many people are after) then you have to make sure that you won't be using an ISO setting that makes your camera produce more noise that you can post-process (given your ...


10

The original question is based on incorrect assumption (about digital sensor not changing state during the exposure) but the concept is related to the Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) idea researched by Eric Fossum. http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/research/advanced-image-sensors-and-camera-systems/ The QIS is a revolutionary change in the way we collect images ...


9

Exposure compensation is just another means of changing either shutter or aperture. I is not some fourth component of exposure, there are still only three: ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture. If you have manually selected an aperture, changing EC will reduce shutter speed. If you have manually selected a shutter speed, changing EV will increase the size of the ...


9

You are not actually adding light, you are simply enhancing what little light you gathered. With a JPEG, "stretching" or "pushing" and "attenuating" are all done in the camera, and those enhancements are baked into the JPEG file, which is then lossy compressed and stored in a low precision format (8-bpc, 0-255). With a RAW image, you are storing the ...


8

Exposure is defined as the total quantity of light that hits the film or sensor during the time the shutter is open. Exposure compensation in Tv or Av modes will change the shutter speed or aperture, which in turn changes the total amount of light that hits the sensor, i.e. it changes the exposure. When shooting in manual mode the aperture and shutter ...


8

It would help if you said which camera model you're currently using, since different compact cameras (even from the same era, manufacturer and price range) can have wildly different feature sets. That said, let me list a couple of options that you're fairly likely to have available. As other answers have noted, you camera may have a "snow mode" that tries ...


8

Is spot metering just an EV compensation? Metering, regardless of type, and exposure compensation are different functions with different purposes. Metering is used to obtain exposure exposure settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed), while exposure compensation is used to modify those values. It is basically the difference between nouns and adjectives. ...


7

The terms push and pull are still relevant in the sense that they are still used and understood by many enthusiast photographers. But they are probably not as common as they once were. New terms, such as expose to the right describe the same concept using different words. If you underexpose when taking the shot, then you push the exposure in editing to ...


7

There is nothing special or magical in RAW files. When it comes to exposure and balance, RAW files just store more information about colors, than JPEG files do. Either way, these colors consist of Red, Green, and Blue values and by manipulating these values you can always adjust white balance or exposure, regardless of the file type... in the ideal world. ...


7

Always trust the histogram. Unless you diligently adjust the rear LCD brightness every time the ambient lighting changes significantly, you cannot really rely on that. It does sound like you have the LCD set too bright. Check the "LCD Brightness" entry in the "Setup 2" menu.


6

The most obvious thing is that you chose to use f/11 for your photos. At least according to the EXIF data on this image, your lens had a maximum aperture value of f/5.1 at this focal length. By using that kind of aperture, you get two stops worth of exposure and therefore you could drop your ISO by two stops. You say in a comment that you wanted more depth ...


6

That image is bright because it is boosted electronically. You don't really want to have that image, as it's extremely noisy. It only looks (somewhat) ok on the camera's LCD because you can't really judge image quality on that tiny screen. But if you want to create an image like that, turn up ISO and aperture to maximum and select a sufficient shutter speed....


6

If you've overexposed, you want to pull rather than push your film. Film pushing involves developing to higher than normal contrast, which causes a given exposure to produce more density. Since this is proportional to exposure, exposures barely recordable move up to low-mid tones, middle exposures move up to high-mid, and highlight level exposures "...


5

You are incorrect in the assumption that redundancy is a bad thing. A good HDR tool will be able to average the results of many images to reduce noise. Having more images also reduces the chance that there is movement in one of the images that will impact the result. A few points, DXO also measures dynamic range at each ISO setting. The NEX 5R has 13.1 EVs ...


5

If you'll look at the exposure data of both images you will see, that they are not equivalent. That means that the shadow spot was exposured differently and thus has different intensity. That's how auto exposure work. Generally speaking, it "thinks" that the average intensity of all pixels in a picture must be grey and so adjusts the exposure for such a ...


4

The reason it makes sense to use smaller brackets is that you get better detail when dealing with a scene with less dynamic range. Any part of the range of the image that isn't used is wasted. You want to be sure your images are hitting the black and white points for maximum benefit. If an image only covers a 17EV range, then your best result will come ...


4

This isn't so much about camera features as it is knowing how a camera's autoexposure system works. A P&S will screw up in the same way your dSLR did on these shots if you just set everything to auto and bang away. The feature you want is spot metering, and it's very common on P&S cameras and works pretty much as it does on your dSLR. Even the Canon ...


4

Software have trouble when there is motion in the scene to merge into an HDR image or even perform Exposure Fusion. There are two ways to deal with this: Increase your odds by shooting multiple brackets or multiple of each frame in a bracket. Take longer exposures. This is particularly needed for fluorescent lighting which cycles in north america at 1/60s (...


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