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34

For all practical purposes, any of the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS/IS II/IS STM lenses are totally redundant if you already have an EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS in good working condition. What you should not do is buy another lens because it is very marginally better on paper than your current lens. That's how you waste money on GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome). ...


21

The EF-S 18-55mm has had many iterations over the years...so when you say you're considering the 18-55mm, you need to be specific to the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS, EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II, or EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM? I'm assuming that you're shopping new lenses, so you'd run into either the IS ...


8

Focus is not the issue here. The issue is coverage. Any lens gathers light from a cone in front of it (angle depending on the focal length), and projects it to a cone behind it (angle depending on coverage). So long as the lens is far enough away from the film plane, there exists some plane in the real world that will be focused on the film plane. But......


8

The schema (and your interpretation) is misleading. If the blue rays are parallel then they come from a source which is infinitely far away. When you shoot a real object, most of it is off-axis, and if the object is not very far away light rays from it hit the lens with various angles of incidence:


5

"(All blue rays are coming from different part of the real world object)" That is incorrect. In the drawing all blue rays are coming from the same point source in the real world; and they are focused into the same point on the image plane as one small part of the image. At every point on the objective lens there is all of the light required for a complete ...


3

Take for example a star. It is massive. It is many times larger than the front of a camera lens. Yet it is so far away that it appears to be a point source of light.¹ Light rays from such a massive object at such a long distance will arrive at the front of the lens as collimated light. That is, they will be parallel to one another. Even point sources of ...


2

It appears to be an early Pentax "K" mount. The recessed Aperture Simulator slot opposite the Aperture control lever is the clue. This slot is clearly visible in your first photo. There are lots of inexpensive adapters available to mount Pentax "K" mount lenses on your Canon EOS Rebel XS. This one costs about $15. Vello Pentax K Lens to Canon EF-S-...


2

I am an athletics photographer, and I have a dilemma. First off, I use the 5D Mark II body. Currently, I own the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 USM II, and I LOVE it... except for indoor photos. Before I purchased this lens, I used the 70-200mm f/2.8 for indoor volleyball and the photos turned out great, but I needed the 400mm for other outdoor sports. You most likely ...


2

There are several good answers here and I just wanted to point out some things. The diameter of the "mouth" of the lens doesn't have to do with image quality. Sometimes is used for marketing, and sometimes are needed for a bigger elements inside. But given two lenses with same optics and different diameters will have the same projected image on the sensor. ...


2

The 17-85 has image stabilization which all in all allows you to take better photos. That combined with a larger zoom range makes it more universal.


2

The "Sony E 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS PZ" lens is listed in lensfun's database as supported starting with version 1.534, but it does not yet appear that there's an entry for the Alpha 6100. If you visit the web site, you can find instructions for generating images to submit for them to analyze to get new cameras and/or lenses supported. The documentation also ...


2

I am currently owning the a7 III, the Tamron 28-75 2.8 and the Sony 85 1.8 which is at the center of your question. Camera The decision between the a7 and the a7r model is he first you should make: Both cams share a lot of traits, however there is more difference than just resolution. Advantages of the a7 III Slightly better performance in low light due ...


2

If it's all in good working condition it was a steal at that price. Just enjoy it. The lens isn't for macro, though you could persuade it to do close-ups of fairly near objects. It's a 'telephoto zoom' so generally it's used to bring far-off objects 'closer' [or to better fill your frame without having to get closer yourself.] At some point you'll want ...


1

The camera lens projects an image of the outside world on the surface of photographic film or digital sensor. The focal length of this lens is a measurement taken, lens-to-image, when the lens is focused on a far distant object (like a star). The focal length defines how big images of objects will be. The longer the focal length, the bigger they image. All ...


1

Ok, for future people searching for this issue, I think this is resolved. The issue (for me, at least) was not enough light on the target. I was doing the testing indoors, beside a window mid-day (curtains open) and below a tungsten dining room light. But this was not enough light on the target for the auto focus to perform it's best. IIRC, my shutter ...


1

Why not take both and find out? The whole point of interchangeable lens cameras is having multiple lenses, and starting with both will give you a lot of learning experience early on about how lenses differ. Also, you might want to add some prime lenses and a 70-210 as soon as you have some money to spare ... Many readers here will have more than 5 lenses, ...


1

Not much to say after Hueco's answer. You do not get a new lens just because. Find out what you need and what your current lens lacks and based on that you get a new lens. But in general terms, you do not buy a lens that has similar characteristics to the one you have. You could go for a prime 85mm lens for portraits, or a zoom telephoto, or an ultra-wide ...


1

I want to start photograph newborns... Which lens could give me sharp pictures and beautiful bokeh? None. For newborns, you usually won't get good bokeh no matter what lens you use because they are usually lying directly on the "background". They can't crawl or sit up or even raise their head. You can try different compositions with parent + baby, but then ...


1

A reason to select a prime lens, is that for the money, one normally gets a bigger aperture, which lets in more light, or has a more limited depth of field. A second reason prime lenses are used is that for the cost, mass and size they product better image quality with mid-apertures. More light is helpful in limited lighting, like in a church, where flash ...


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