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32

Because the chromatic aberrations happen in the lens, not the sensor - the picture is already distorted by the time it reaches the sensor, so it doesn't matter if there is a Bayer matrix (or any other kind of matrix. Or no filter at all) in front of the sensor or not. (As an aside, there is no difference between a smartphone and any other sort of camera here)...


5

First chromatic aberration is "function" of lens, not sensor. And I have no information about lens which do not have such aberration. Moreover because of the size lens in phone cameras have less space to correct it. Second the image from camera (not RAW) is fake in sense of colours. This is because each pixel is generated by camera/postprocessiong ...


5

This is exactly what a telecompressor/focal reducer/"speed booster" is for. It can be bought as a ready made unit with a choice of mirrorless camera mounts on one side and a choice of SLR/DSLR mounts on the other. Since these devices are more expensive than normal adapters, it can be worth buying strategically in case you have multiple legacy ...


4

Chromatic aberration is a plague suffered by every lens. Opticians can mitigate but not eliminate. The simplest solution is to construct the lens using two lens elements. One is a strong positive lens convex as to its figure. This lens is too strong thus the focal length is too short. This lens is sandwiched together with a weak negative lens with a concave ...


3

Lens designs, even in the olden days, are highly optimized for sharpness and several kinds of optical aberrations. Even small changes, including distance between elements, are bound to degrade image quality. So, usually, you don't want to tamper with the existing design. Instead you add lenses, either in front (fish eye lens) or between lens and camera (...


3

Typically, if a lens is removable it is normally labeled with its true/actual (rounded) focal length, without any consideration for what it might be attached to (I don't know of any exceptions). That is true for the 18-55 kit lens you have as well; it is not adjusted for crop factor. Conversely, if the lens is not removable the focal length is generally ...


2

At a basic level, the software that processes the data from the Bayer sensor is trying to reasonably faithfully reproduce the analog image that was projected onto the sensor. This would include chromatic aberration, as the software doesn't really know what you are taking a picture of and what may or may not be wanted image details. But the software can know ...


2

I once was asking Panasonic support about the effect with a MFT zoom lens and support replied that the lens actually has "mini gyros" that spin. Also for the zoom lens the sound becomes more noticeable when you extend the focal length.


2

If the "stock lens" is the SELP1650: It is known to sacrifice some edge performance for compactness when used at the extreme wide angle setting. Also, sometimes you read reports of there being badly decentered copies. What is seen in the example image could be a) decentering (given the right side appears significantly worse), b) field curvature ...


2

All this confusion comes from the old "bad habit" to express field-of-view values not by themselves, but by the focal length that gives this field of view on a "standard" 24*36 film area. Now that sensors come in all sizes (FF, cropped, M43, whatever), that habit fails miserably. The focal length given with any lens means exactly that, ...


2

The block diagram for your lens appears to be a variation of the Zeiss Tessar design created by Dr. Ralph Rudolph. Roger Cicala, in one of his excellent blog entries at lensrentals.com says: Literally dozens of today’s excellent lenses are simply modifications of the Tessar: Leitz Elmars, Zeiss Sonnars, Kodak Ektars, Schneider Xenars, Voigltander ...


1

The only way to get your lens to focus to infinity, is to move the lens further from the film/sensor plane, to where it was designed to be. I assume it can be made to focus if i change distance between lens elements? What elements i need to space out to restore focus ability, can correct spacing be figured out mathematically? What is the basis of your ...


1

I think a possible source of confusion here is that colour is continuous not discrete - it's convenient to talk about "red light" as though it had a single definition, but in reality, "visible light" can be composed of any combination of the entire spectrum of wavelengths that our eyes are equipped to detect. So when you say: ... each ...


1

Addendum: There is a false assumption "light of only one color passes through it.". The materials sensor color filters are made of attenuate other colors to varying degrees, but they are far from "brick wall" filters that work on a "650nm, all gets through. 650.01nm, nothing gets through" basis. Not only would making anything ...


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