The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

7

Simple answer: there isn't one. The longest lenses made for (relatively) large sensor cameras like your D3400 have a focal length of around 1000mm, only a third of the P1000's max length of 3000mm. Also: Those very long lenses are prime lenses: no zoom. Those lenses are really quite large. Those lenses, if available at all, cost around $100,000. If you ...


4

The Sigma MC11 adapter has no optical elements between the lens and the camera body. It simply extends the distance the lens is in front of the imaging sensor of the shorter 18mm registration distance Sony E-mount cameras so that the lens is 44mm away from the image sensor. This is the same distance from the imaging sensor as a Canon EF mount lens would be ...


3

All Nikon F-mount lenses, apart from a few specialist lenses, can be used on almost all Nikon digital camera bodies that accept interchangeable lenses. That includes all D-series DSLRs and, with a Nikon adapter, all Z-series or 1-series mirrorless/compact-systems-camera types. Depending on the exact details, you may lose ability to use the autofocus ...


3

While there would be solutions below the price of a P1000 to reach the pure focal length of 3000mm equivalent (eg starting with an off brand 500mm prime and stacking two teleconverters), such would be slow, unstabilized, manual focus, big, and requiring substantial post processing of the results. Handholding an unstabilized 1200mm equivalent lens is ...


2

Now we know that Tamron may have autofocus issues right out of the box, and may require tweaking via the tap-in console... The-Digital-Picture does their lens tests using careful manual focus, so AF performance does not affect the image quality samples at TDP. How much coffee Bryan has had before testing a lens might! The real users on the Internet, on ...


2

The problem is that sensors hate it if light hits them in all too angled a fashion, so short focal length lenses that are simply very close to the sensor and project light in a "wide funnel" fashion can create surprises (eg color vignettes or very bad corner performance). The most radical option is using an 28mm or 35mm rangefinder or enlarger lens of true ...


2

I withdraw my previous answer. It now seems likely that the lens in question is the manual-focus AI-S lens, because the name stamped inside this lens’s filter ring is exactly the name given by the OP, whereas the AF variants have names that start with “AF Nikkor”. For full compatibility* with this and all other AI/AI-S lenses, you need a camera that has an ...


2

You're confusing diffraction limited aperture (DLA), which is where the effects of diffraction are first barely detectable using a specific digital sensor, with the diffraction cutoff frequency, which is reached at a much smaller aperture. For most cameras it is much smaller than the lens' minimum aperture. For a digital camera, the DLA is determined by ...


1

They appear to be totally different optical formulas. The SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di LD has 16 elements in 14 groups The 28-75mm f/2.8 Di III RXD has 15 elements in 12 groups Although they are both the same diameter and use the same filter size, the newer shorter registration lens is 25.9mm longer. The difference in the registration distance between the E-...


1

There are several thing to consider here: Based on reading a lot of reviews from a lot of different sources one can learn that the Sigma Art series of prime lenses are very sharp when focused manually but tend to not do very well on Canon cameras in terms of autofocus. I probably wouldn't consider such a lens unless my intended usage was primarily as a ...


1

Adapters that do not contain optical elements do not change the focal length of the lens. Adapters with optical elements often modify focal length by about 1.4x. Another type of adapter, known as a focal reducer, commonly modifies focal length by 0.7x. Focal length is based on when the lens is focused to infinity. When focusing closer, focus breathing, or ...


1

The camera used to test a lens affects image quality. The exact same lens can be moved from one body to another with very different results. The Digital Picture prefers to use Canon bodies, but Tamron makes lenses for multiple camera mounts. Reviews from multiple sources, using different bodies and copies of the lens, are likely to report different results. ...


1

They may have had a bad copy of the lens. Consider, for example, the Canon EF 35mm f/2 non-IS non-USM lens. TheDigitalPicture says this. Whereas, DxOMark says this (see field map at f/2.8). According to TDP, the 35mm lens is crap in the corners even at f/2.8. According to DxOMark, it's quite a good lens assuming you stop down to f/2.8. Obligatory links: ...


1

A try at the longest realistic Nikon lens for the camera is the 200-500 f/5.6. With your APS-C sensor, that provides about an 800 mm effective focal length. To get the same field of view as the P1000 you would need to crop to about 1/4 of the frame in each direction. That reduces your pixel count to about 1.5M, which sounds terrible but is not so bad ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible