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48

One answer to this question is not what existing lenses & sensors can do in practice, but what an optical system can do in theory. Here 'in theory' means 'in perfect seeing conditions, with no atmospheric disturbance at all'. I suspect (but am not sure) that for relatively small optical systems like camera lenses, and relatively good atmospheric ...


12

If you simply want visual examples with commonly available lenses and resolutions the webpage: "Guide to Identifying or Recognizing a Face: Resolution, Focal length, and Megapixels" has a number of examples. Axis Communications has what they call a Pixel Density Model: Examples of maximum distances for identification (500 px/m or 80 pixels/face). The Axis ...


6

You need to differentiate the camera, on where the sensor or film resides and the optical elements. This can be either lenses or mirrors. A mirror telescope is a good example of an open structure. This structure is only to hold the elements aligned. But it still needs housing at the end, to make a labyrinth so no direct light enters the last element, where ...


4

Both of your examples are shot at apertures significantly narrower than your camera's diffraction limited aperture. The EOS Rebel T6i/750D has a 22.3 x14.9 mm sensor with 6,000 x 4,000 pixels for a resolution of 24 MP and a pixel pitch of 3.72 µm. This figures out to a DLA of f/6.0 The answer linked above states the following: With a digital sensor the ...


4

Can I use 50mm f2 lens to take building photos? In my case will be an Yashica ML 50mm f/2. Yes. Yes you can.


3

I took this hand-held (or maybe having support from a flat platform but not a tripod) with Nikon D750 and Tamron 150 - 600 mm at 600 mm, f/11, 1/2000 s and ISO 1600. I didn't think of the settings too much since I was just demoing the camera to a friend. ISO seems to be on a higher end for these conditions but other scenes were more in the shadows :) The ...


3

You can take building photos with any lens you have. The biggest tradeoff is in perspective - if you have a relatively long lens, the perspective is completely different than a wide-angle lens because you have to step back farther to get the entire building in. Only you can decide exactly what type of look you are aiming for. There are other tradeoffs, too -...


3

I'm interested in doing Street Photography... Which is the best option between the two lenses? Street photography is about location ("street"). People may use any lens they desire. What works best depends on the person. Between the two options you mention, I'd consider going with the 17/1.8 because I'd expect it to be reasonably versatile and 14-42/3.5-5....


3

I'm interested in doing Street Photography, so I'm looking for something portable and I wonder if there is any relevant difference in lightweight between the two lenses. This really is a matter of preference. On occasion, I go hiking with a Pentax 645N. Back in the day shooters used things like a Graflex. So, whether or not something is "portable" enough is ...


3

It depends on the lens you're using. I have a sigma 150-600mm lens on a Nikon D850 and I can safely identify people over a distance of 1.2km There is a CANON 5200mm lens, with a much longer reach: The 5200mm Prime, which was manufactured in Japan, has insane zoom distances. It is designed to focus on objects 18 to 32 miles away. Basically, if the 5200mm ...


3

It's hard to tell without more information & EXIF data. Here are some possible explanations (and why more info is helpful) If using "One Shot" focus mode, if a subject (or camera) moves after the camera locks focus then it will not re-focus. AF point review will indicate which AF was used to lock focus, but it is an indication of which AF point was ...


3

The eye does not use a projection plane but some sort of spherical projection surface which is converted to 3D in "post production". This 3D conversion even happens (using motion estimation and integration) when looking just with one eye. There are considerably different resolutions in the core viewing area and peripheral vision. In general, it is agreed ...


2

I am puzzled. How to decide which MM lens to use in which situation? I usually want to shoot landscapes and wildlife. Which lens is suitable for these specifically? Most people associate wide angle shots with landscape photography. However, here's a whole tip article on using a telephoto for landscape. Most people associate telephoto shots with wildlife. ...


2

Diffraction For the Canon EOS 1300D, you can see the calculated DLA of f/6.8 at that camera's review at The-Digital-Picture. Bryan also has a short article about what DLA is and how it affects images. All of the Canon cameras reviewed at The-Digital-Picture since about 2004 or so have the calculated DLA listed. It's included in the "Specifications" list ...


2

It's not motion blur. The blur at any particular point seems to be diffused evenly in all directions. This points to poor alignment of the lens. Possible causes of poor lens alignment could be: An IS/VR/VC/etc. element at full deflection. Lens based image stabilization works by slight changes in the centering and/or tilt of the stabilizing element. This ...


2

To continue with the demonstrations... The Nikon P900 has 16MP sensor and an 83x zoom. They did a few tests, not exactly to your requirements but quite close. See the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRp13pRzzWQ In short, they could read large letters on a piece of paper at about 1KM. Beyond that things did go a bit wrong, and the level of zoom doesn'...


2

Both images appear to be front-focused. The rocks in front of the dog look like they are sharper than the dog. This might be an issue that could be solved using AFMA, or it might be a problem where you think you are telling the camera to focus on one thing when you are really telling the camera to focus where it thinks best. Since you haven't told us what ...


2

My tips: Using primes mostly, wide open. Trying to get as much ambient as possible. Organizers like to see all the effort that went into the lightning: Flash, diffused as much as possible: either by bouncing off a ceiling or by using a flash disc if ceilings too far away. Typical bounced flash shot looks like this: Sometimes I place 4 flashes and light ...


1

Taking Rafael's answer to an astronomical extreme, in the case of gravitational lensing, where the lens element can be the sun, galaxy clusters, etc., there's no possibility of making the lens an enclosed tube. So no, a camera (more specifically, a camera's lens) does not have to have a contiguous housing.


1

Several telescope designs, some of which were used with a camera at the prime focus, were an open tube design. Such a design, under certain conditions, is favored because it is light weight. Naturally they are highly susceptible to stray light as well as differing densities of air interfering with the optical path.


1

A camera lens is a kind of telescope. Hence it has the known resolution limit that is equal to λ/D, where λ is the wavelength of the observed light, and D is the diameter of the objective. The obtained value is in angular units, not centimeters. For a yellow light with a wavelength of 580 nm, a camera with 12 cm diameter objective should have about 1 arc ...


1

Your lenses appear to have Pentax K mount. They should work with adapter without any issue. However, image quality is unlikely to be comparable with modern kit lenses. The Pentax K mount is a bayonet mount with three tabs. There is an aperture control pin that opens and closes the aperture. Opposite that, there is a coupling pin that communicates the ...


1

The 50mm is the most flexible lens you can get. You can photograph anything you want, with maybe subpar results. If you have old lenses, you can even make them become a tilt-shift one with one of these adapters. Tilt-shift capabilities can be pretty handy for real estate. However, if you plan on taking pictures inside, or in a narrow street, the 50mm lens ...


1

I don't actually know the answer to this but would assume that each lens has differing light transmission properties such that differing tints may come through. But, aside from that, wanted to frame challenge this question a bit: The reason I ask is my auto white balance in wide angle lens seems to be different from auto white balance when I am using a ...


1

Modern lenses are fabricated using an array of single element lenses. Some elements are air-spaced, some are glued together. Such a design is necessary because a single element lens suffers from a minimum of seven optical defects we call aberrations. In theory, it would take seven individual lens elements to counter these aberrations. Such an aberration free ...


1

I used a 16-35 f/4 for 90% of my shots during my last trip to Iceland. An 85 f/1.2 for the rest. What’s more important than lenses for landscape is: tripod, polarizing filter, neutral density filters, remote shutter release. Don’t put the cart before the horse - your 18-50 should give you a decent range to play with. Before looking at other lenses, make ...


1

Given the asymmetric blurriness (lower left > upper right), some lens element is probably out of alignment. I suspect a floating element, such as used by image stabilization systems. I doubt a properly functioning image stabilization system would cause that amount of blur. Though you deny dropping the camera or lens, you do admit to "the odd light knock". ...


1

With regards to the body, there is no question: the D7500 is far better suited to fast action photography. The D500 would be even better, but is perhaps outside your price envelope. The choice of lens, as you've surmised through good research, is less clear. All of your concerns are valid. Personally, I would lean toward the 80-200mm. The 70-300mm is too ...


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