Hot answers tagged

37

It's likely the sum of a few factors. Firstly, although you state "the same f-stop", it's important to realise that the manufacturer stated focal length and aperture values are often rounded, and not always in the way you'd expect. It might be the case that the Samyang is f/1.45 in reality, not f/1.4. The next factor is vignetting, wide aperture lenses are ...


36

First, understand a couple of things: Even though we call these things "digital cameras," the process of turning photons into numbers is entirely analog. Analog circuits pick up all manner of noise from their surroundings. Noise isn't one constant value, it's a range of them that top out at a level called the noise floor. The processing you did on the ...


35

It looks like there are parallel light trails below each streelamp -- going down, then right, then down some more (ASCII art): / | | | \_ \ | And highlighted on the original: I would guess that these are when the shutter button was pressed, tilting the camera, because only bright sources show this effect. This is in addition to the normal, more ...


30

The key here is how much light will be hitting sensor during flash, and how much during the rest of exposure. The sensor does gather light during the whole exposure; all of it is blended into one static image. In case the ambient light is much lower, it won't have nearly as much effect on the total light that reaches the sensor, and therefore only surfaces ...


28

It is for the same reason that chromatic aberration occurs at all: different wavelengths of light will bend at slightly different angles when passing through the same refractive medium such as a lens element. Chromatic aberration in most well designed photographic lenses will be less severe because the lens has been designed to correct for it at the various ...


27

You can definitely improve on the standard "cloudy day" look with some preparation at shooting time and a bit of post-processing afterwards. As you shoot... Switch the camera's white balance setting to cloudy: this will help keep the tones a bit warmer. Compose to avoid large amounts of sky: you can play with the rest of the photo in post-processing but a ...


27

"Colour" is essentially a property of the distribution of wavelengths of visible light (as perceived by humans). Digital cameras only detect the amount of light at each pixel, they can't measure the wavelength and thus can't record colours directly. Colour images are produced by placing alternating red/green/blue filters in front of each pixel. By placing a ...


27

The look you are going for is known as low key lighting. It is not necessary for the room to be dark. You just need to put enough light on your subject that there is a large enough difference between the shadows and the highlights. I took this self portrait by shooting into a mirror in a fully lit room. By using a good amount of flash power I could use a ...


27

You could've probably got a decent result just by picking an intermediate exposure. Alternatively, you can try to take a short and a long exposure of the same scene, and combine them digitally afterwards. Here's what I got just by taking your two images above (mouse cursor and all), aligning them (manually, using the Scale tool in GIMP) and blending them ...


23

Look at your own shadow. If you can't find your shadow then the light is as soft as it possibly can be. If you have a hard edged shadow then the light is hard. If you can make out your shadow but it's faint or the edges are not defined then you have somewhere in between (which can often give the best results).


23

Maybe it represents the small variation of the temperature of the sensor. A hot sensor produces more noise than a cool one. The small temperature difference can be explained by the presence of electronic components, or the way the sensor is in contact with other parts, allowing more or less heat dissipation. Some related links : http://en.wikipedia.org/...


20

Body - you can get better high ISO performance from a full frame body, if you're willing to rent one. That's worth a couple of stops. Lens - another couple of stops if you buy/hire an f/1.4 or f/1.8 lens, especially if you're shooting at the long end of your zoom at f/5.6 Light - in the picture you've given as an example, you seem to be standing in the dark....


20

With regard to reasonably bright stellar objects: technically, yes. With regard to dimmer objects like those that make up most of what we mean when we say "The Milky Way": practically speaking, no. In addition to the phase of the Moon, which determines the overall amount of light falling on the atmosphere above a specific location on the Earth's surface, ...


20

Overexposed areas have a sharp cut-off when the maximum pixel value is reached. You have a completely white area if this happens in all colour channels. There is nothing you can do in post to recover information in those areas. In contrast, underexposed areas retain information, but when you brighten them, you amplify the noise, too, and with less bits to ...


19

Let's start with lenses at the same location, and then address the moving the longer lens farther away to get the same field of view. Lenses at the same location The 50mm f/1.4 lens has an effective aperture that's twice the diameter, and four times the area, of the 25mm f/1.4 lens. The 50mm will, therefore, collect four times as much light (four times as ...


19

Just because the image is mostly black doesn't mean the scene is dark. With a flash positioned on the left pointing at the subject (he's facing the flash) and a black backdrop you could possibly even pull this off in daylight. Start with a low ISO, a middle of the road aperture and the sync speed for shutter speed (probably 1/200th or 1/250th). The point ...


19

The only thing that means is that it is recommended that the sun does not enter directly thru the window. See what happens if the window is pointing north (on the northern hemisphere). From autumn to spring the sun will be on the south side of your house, so will not hit the north window. In summer (northern hemisphere) if you live below the tropic the sun ...


17

The image we can see from an infrared camera is what is known as a false color image. What this means is that a range of wavelengths in the infrared spectrum are rendered with a corresponding wavelength of visible light. Just as with visible light, a particular wavelength of infrared light can vary in intensity from just above black (shadows) to near ...


16

Ruined? That's a great photo! (If you were going for a sort of Halloween effect.) The position of the key light – off to the side and elevated – was perfect for this subject, and is typical of how beauty dishes are used. Now, if you didn't want the shadow here are things to consider: Using a single source you can't have the subject against a ...


16

The ideal lens would cause light beams of every color to come to a focus at the same distance from the lens. That would be the focal length of the lens when the lens is imaging at infinity (∞ as far as the eye can see. When we image objects that are closer than infinity, they come to a focus further away from the lens. That is why we must cause the camera ...


15

What you encountered is the dynamic-range limit of your camera. All cameras and films have a limit to the dynamic-range they capture and scenes where the contrast is too high will always cause exactly this kind of problem. For cases with moving subjects, like a wedding, they are two avenues to diminish the issue: Reframe so that your subject is surrounded ...


15

EV is a measure of illuminance, which is defined in the link you provided as "luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area". You are correct in stating that when if you keep field of view, depth of field and subject brightness constant: Ev_crop = Ev_ff x c² however since: Area_crop = Area_ff / c² and Light(total) = EV x Area we arrive at ...


15

Neither. Underexposure means that you did not deliver enough light and you are losing information in shadows. Overexposure means that you delivered too much light and losing information in highlights. Both are wrong. Expose correctly. Check your histogram or allow the blinking under/over exposure alarm in the preview to see how are you doing. Correct if ...


15

This is motion blur caused by 'panning'. Ideally, you would use a tripod or monopod and track the car (panning) as it's moving with a relatively slow shutter speed. The background will blur as you move the camera, but the car will stay in focus as it's relative position with the camera hasn't changed. The slower your shutter speed the harder it will be to ...


14

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


13

Photographing Milky way while a full moon is up? No. Can't be done. Photographing other stellar objects then? Yes, with reservations. The problem is the amount of particles in atmosphere. Air pollution, dust and water/humidity. Particles in air reflect the light from moon practically blanketing the whole sky with thin haze. Quite similar to what light ...


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


12

Here is a methodology to find it: Prepare a white screen on you computer, for example a white document in GIMP. Take an out-of-focus photo, for example, focus at infinity and the widest aperture to avoid vignetting. Use different settings. Overexpose until the histogram is almost to the right. Underexpose until the histogram is almost to the left. Open the ...


12

It seems from the original question and several conflicting comments that the images were shot in the following way: No flash In fairly bright daylight Av exposure mode with a fairly wide aperture Drive mode set to 'High Speed Continuous', often referred to as "burst" mode. If that is the case, the issue is most likely one of the following: Inconsistency ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible