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58

Why are hardware-based manipulations, like black and white photography (traditionally using black-and-white film), long exposure, etc., which also result in an "unnatural" image, acceptable while software-based manipulation (like HDR) is frowned upon by the photography community? Differences from human perception that are due to limitations of the medium ...


42

TL;DR - Pretty much everything in your post indicates that you don't really need a new camera, but need to learn how to use the equipment that you have. I haven't used RAW... it still boggles my mind a bit that the RAW to JPEG conversion can't have an option to do this automatically. This is like driving a race car and never shifting past second. The ...


22

What's the difference between “Fake HDR” and real, bracketed exposure HDR? The only difference is how broadly or narrowly you decide to define the term High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDR). Do you use the broader term as it has been historically used for over 150 years to reference techniques used to display a scene with higher dynamic range than the dynamic ...


21

Is it frowned upon? Photography has always made use of whatever technology was available, whether in the camera, the darkroom or, now, the computer. It's a long time since other forms of art were required to be 'photorealistic'. No need for photography to be either! If you find yourself among people who disagree, work within their rules if you find ...


20

There are already camera's with DR larger than the human eye, both instantly and overall. The human eye's dynamic range is not as large as most people tend to think it is. As I recall, it is somewhere around 12 to 16 EVs, which is right around the level of a modern DSLR. The primary difference is that we have extremely natural aperture control that will ...


19

In the immortal words of the late National Geographic photo editor Bob Gilka, "Kid, if you want to be a better photographer, you're going to have to stand in front of more interesting stuff." That said, welcome to the sometimes not-so-wonderful world of the commercial/industrial photographer. As often as not, making a dramatic, exciting picture of something ...


18

It sounds like what you're looking for is JPEG2000. It has a range of options including a 16-bit lossy compression and better compression ratios than JPEG. It hasn't been as widely adopted as hoped (for a host of reasons) and may have some patent issues that might make it difficult to use in certain situations but otherwise it fits your needs. Personally ...


15

HDR-TV is (yet) another standard of video transmission. The color gamut is wider (see rec 2020 vs rec 709) but so is the resolution. The standard is supposed to be backwards compatible which means you will only see the benefits of the wider gamut if you have a television that supports it, but if you don't you will still be able to view the stream in the ...


13

The interesting thing here is that's not a colour cast, the hue values are messed up. It's not just that all the colours have been pushed toward purple, which can happen for certain white balance settings, what's actually happened is that all colours are shifted round the colour wheel, blue/cyan -> purple, orange/brown -> green. Here's the right hand ...


13

There are quite a few advantages. A difficult problem that often arises is blooming of bright areas into adjacent dark areas. So, the overexposed pixels that are in the bright area will leak electrons to adjacent pixels, making them get gray values that are too high. If the contrast is very high, those pixels may be in dark areas. This means that with only ...


12

The best method I have found is to shoot the moon when there is still enough light in the sky to narrow the dynamic range between the Moon's surface and the surrounding sky. A moon just a little past new can be shot shortly after sunset and exposed so that details are visible from the earthshine reflecting from the dark part of the new moon. Shooting an ...


12

Almost any camera system will out perform a camera phone when used properly. A camera phone uses a tiny sensor so even MFT cameras have a bigger sensor capturing more light so superior in low light conditions. Phones use night mode to overcome their bad high ISO performance. Night mode in most cases is a merge of several images to get more information. ...


11

With an image like this, the best and easiest solution is probably manual exposure fusion. It's easy enough to do in any raster graphics editor (GIMP, Photoshop, etc.). For example, here's what I managed to produce from your original images in a few minutes in GIMP: Here are the steps I used: Open both images as layers in GIMP, with the darker image (moon ...


11

It all depends on the scene in terms of overall brightness, the total dynamic range, and how fine the graduations are between bright and dark. The wider the difference is between the brightest part and the darkest part of the scene, the further apart your darkest and brightest exposures need to be. The best way to measure this is to use your camera's ...


11

The phenomenon you describe is called color constancy, and it is enabled partially by the human vision system's chromatic adaptation and partially by something I will describe using the scientific term complicated stuff in our brains. That may sound a bit glib, but this is actually a complicated topic with whole books just scratching the surface and ...


11

There are usually small variations between images when you shoot a stack for HDR, especially shooting handheld. Wind may cause larger variations, as well as other moving entities within a shot (such as a pedestrian in the distance). Photo editing software is good at dealing with these variations. However, certain items, especially complex/movement-prone ...


11

Why are hardware-based manipulations, like black and white photography (traditionally using black-and-white film), long exposure, etc., which also result in an "unnatural" image, acceptable while software-based manipulation (like HDR) is frowned upon by the photography community? Because we feel we need to put a line that separates photography from painting ...


10

Seeing is an active process A big issue is that looking with your eyes is very unlike capturing an image - an image needs to include all information that the looker might look at, but normal vision is an active process that involves movement of the eyes, refocusing and dilation of pupils according to the objects we're looking at. Thus, if you want to ...


10

Yes and No. Taking a single RAW, you have more dynamic range than a single JPG, so you have a limited 'high dynamic range', depending on the camera's capabilities. For a less limited HDR, you need to do bracketing - you shoot a series of identical compositions, while changing exposure, for example -4, -2, 0, +2, +4. This allows you to compose those shots ...


10

This can happen when there are strong light light sources in the scene (such as shooting sunrises/sunsets like yours), when Nikon's Active D-Lighting is on. Active D-Lighting (ADL) tries to help balance an image that has areas of high local dynamic range; essentially, it is a form of high dynamic range processing. ADL slightly reduces the exposure, so ...


10

Separate answer, just to show confirmation of scotbb's diagnosis. CaptureNX-D with Active D-Lighting overridden. Screen shrunk just to show relevant info. As to whether or not it's an optical illusion, here is a crop of the image, with [L] & without [R] Active D-Lighting, no other changes. Further example of composite image...


9

I know this is late but I have been doing HDR panoramas that have been successful. Here is my method: I stitch first using Hugin. If I bracket say -2,0 and +2 stops I will have three sets of exposures to stitch. I first stitch the set that has the most detail because Hugin will be able to make the best set of control points from this set. Let's say the -...


9

There is a method that can yield some good results given good enough original photos. I don't have the original article on hand, but I can describe the method, but it's up to you to find the particular details that you need to get your desired results. Let's start by merging just two images. Load them in a single Photoshop document's layers. It doesn't ...


9

Like comedy, it's in the timing. Shoot earlier in the day. This was taken in Southern California in December around 5:00pm. Moon. Blue sky. No need for HDR or exposure fusion or masks and layers. The moon is a very bright directly-sun-lit object. Treat accordingly. Canon XT/350D. EF 400mm f/5.6L USM. iso 100, f/11, 1/20s. Tripod and cable release.


9

DRO stands for Dynamic Range Optimization. It is designed to fit more dynamic range into images. A single exposure is still taken so you are always limited to the sensor's latitude. However, from what the sensor captures, more or less of that range is mapped into images. With fixed values, the transform is applied the same to each image. With Auto, it ...


9

It is appropriate in situations where you can't capture the dynamic range in one shot and in situations where lifting the shadows would reveal too much noise. Certain landscape shots and night time cityscapes are an example where HDR makes sense. I think it also depends on your style. I personally do not look for maximum detail being captured in images ...


9

The short answer is: When the dynamic range of the scene exceeds the dynamic range you can capture in one shot with raw. A somewhat longer answer is that is that there are complicating factors, for example, recovered shadows may show more noise than a separate image taken at longer exposure, so the quality of the shadows will be better with multiple shots ...


9

I got into photography with a compact digital P+S just before DSLs became affordable, when all the photography experience and wisdom to absorb was about film. Because the people I learned photography from were all analog shooters, when I got a digital rebel and shot raw, I always made certain not to manipulate the image in a way that could not be done "for ...


8

In principal the HDR methodology can be applied to exposures of any length. However longer exposures are more likely to contain motion which can cause problems for automatic exposure blending programs. One commonly used solution is to manually blend the exposures by masking. Whether or not this counts as "HDR" since it doesn't involve creation of a high ...


8

It is very important to understand the difference between a high dynamic range image, and a high dynamic range image that has been tonemapped back down to low dynamic range for display on a standard monitor. This is a high dynamic range image that has been produced from multiple exposures: Looks dull and lifeless because you're viewing it on a low dynamic ...


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