12

TL;DR: In low light conditions, selecting manual or auto ISO is a decision about risks: having lower or higher noise vs. the probability of blurred pictures vs. time. ISO, aperture, exposure time - these are the in-camera values that determine our photo. (Using a flash adds another one.) It does not matter how the camera arrives at these values. E.g. ISO ...


10

No, there is no difference between Auto ISO choosing ISO 800 versus manually selecting ISO 800. The end result is the same: the photo is taken with an ISO value of 800. Consider this scenario: You take a photo with your camera's fully automatic setting, and it selects an aperture of f/16. You then switch to Aperture Priority mode, manually select f/16, ...


6

First there is no such thing as "no noise". Even on base ISO you have noise in the photos. And set ISO manual do not reduce noise. If you have two photos, one with auto ISO 100 and one with manual ISO 100 both with have (relatively) the same amount of noise. Manual setting of ISO will help you when the camera "decided" to set higher ISO ...


5

You are muddling two things: The particular ISO value chosen (100, 200, 1200, etc) The way of choosing that value It is the value chosen which affects the amount of noise: a high value is more likely to have visible noise, because it is trying to amplify small differences in light to make them visible. A similar kind of noise would appear if you under-...


4

In my opinion, there is only one best practice. Know your stuff, know your gear. In this case, define what is the maximum iso you are willing to use, the maximum noise you are willing to accept in most cases. Prepare a small studio scene, on an interior so the light does not change too much during your session. A Still life scene with some bright colors and ...


4

In short, manual vs automatic ISO setting has nothing to do with noise. I'll try to give a short summary about how noise works, which you help you understand how much noise you will get in different situations. How is ISO related to noise? The ISO value that was used is a good indicator of how noisy the image is assuming that the photo was correctly exposed....


3

With some older Olympus point-n-shoot and older Canons I've seen a difference between auto-ISO (or even full auto mode) using non-standard values such as 1600 vs 1643 in the EXIF. I haven't seen the software that's responsible for it and it might be just some bug, but that's pretty much the thing that comes to my mind. In that case using manual to fit into ...


3

The AE-Lock function simply locks the metered exposure. Cameras generally have two modes of operation for this feature: Press-and-Hold or Press-to-Toggle. Depending on your camera, either one could be the default but this can be configured on most but not all models. First, be sure you actually used AE-Lock. Sometimes you can override the button to do ...


1

With Canon cameras, when using Aperture Priority (Av) exposure mode, half-pressing the shutter button usually only locks AE if one is using a metering mode other than Evaluative Metering. If one is using Evaluative Metering in Av exposure mode, AE does not lock with a shutter half-press but continues to update at the scene brightness changes of the camera is ...


1

The solution is the error of being in "P" mode, but you also have to correct that in the menu settings -it's not just the physical dial on top of the camera. Meaning, in the menu, change the exposure to M instead of P. It's in the first camera icon menu and it's called Exposure Mode.


1

Auto ISO is a very useful tool. Whoever told you that auto ISO is bad is wrong. Obviously, that person doesn't know how to use auto ISO. There is only one issue with auto ISO and people who don't know how to use it. When setting the ISO manually you can limit the amount of noise in a photograph, but when your camera automatically sets the ISO, what it picks ...


1

Personal experience with shooting birds for quite a while, but applies to basically fast movement vs time to play with the buttons: see the (flight) pattern the birds have match the shutter speed so the photo does not look blurry match the f-stop so I get the sharpness / bokeh I want Afterwards, if the light conditions are changing by: quick increase/...


1

Of the three variables that control exposure, ISO is the one with the least creative effect. Aperture directly influences the depth of field. Shutter speed controls the amount of motion blur. ISO on the other hand "just" generates noise if too high. So giving your camera automatic control over ISO doesn't limit your creativity, and helps you focus ...


1

What are some best practices? Practice is the only best practice. Make a picture, look at it, decide what works and what doesn't. Do that a lot. If auto-ISO works for you, use it unless it doesn't. Then try something else. What matters is the picture not the camera settings.


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