Hot answers tagged

50

Yes, there's something you can do. Stop using the card and replace it. Even reputable, high-quality cards have failures. And every such device has a limited lifespan. Don't risk it. You may do something which will cover up the problem, only for it to reoccur and cause you to lose images. SanDisk offers a long warranty in most countries — depending on the ...


38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


29

Why not save all the confusion and just format it in the camera? Both Mac and Windows can read, write and format exFAT, but you need to make sure you are using MBR rather than GUID and the correct sector size that the camera prefers. Rather than have to work all this out, especially if you're not even sure what they mean… just let the camera do it instead. ...


28

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system does ...


26

There are several ways in which an SD card can go bad. Physical Damage First, cards can be actually physically broken. You can bend them in half pretty easily if you try, but in general they're actually pretty resilient. Many are effectively water-proof even if not marketed that way. I've sent cards through the laundry, and once I dropped one full of ...


23

Have you checked file extensions? You might have your camera set in the RAW+JPEG storing mode, producing both .JPG and .NEF file for each shot, showing the same thumbnail for both of them. Also many image viewers would show both of them. Solution: Turn off RAW+JPEG mode and use JPEG only mode. Check page 85 of the Nikon D7000 manual - Image Recording ...


22

LRV is a Low Resolution Video on the GoPro. You can use it on your not-too-powerful computer, edit, and then for the final render use the original, high resolution video. You can view it by renaming to .mp4


20

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


17

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


16

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


13

Both of those are video concerns, and have no real impact on still photography at all. A faster card may allow you to shoot more pictures more quickly, or to shoot longer in high-FPS burst mode (depending on the camera's processor), and that may matter depending on the kind of photography you do. If you don't spend a lot of time shooting in machine-gun mode, ...


12

Yes; I have an EyeFi card and my battery doesn't even stand 50% of its performance. Fortunately I can turn EyeFi-wireless-mode off in my Nikon's D3200 menu. It's described in the user manual here:


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


12

Is there something I can do to solve this situation ? Get another card.


11

There is an advantage to Compact-Flash cards which you get with the fastest models and sufficiently fast camera. This is not what accounts for most of the price difference, volume is. SD cards are sold on considerably higher volume than CF ones. When CF cards were more popular, it used to be the opposite. Nowadays, I would not worry at all about this. The ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


10

The card has probably developed an error. Flash cards (including SD cards) have a limited number of writes, and, while the expected number is large, sometimes failures happen early. Or it could simply be a manufacturing defect. In either of these cases, Sandisk — which has awesome long warranty periods ­— will probably replace the card, but that doesn't do ...


9

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less of ...


9

Your camera is probably not the best or fastest USB memory card reader you can own, so even if you are using the fastest card you can buy and the camera claims to be using the fastest USB protocol your computer can handle, it's not very likely that it will give you the best data transfer speeds. A high-quality, high-speed external USB card reader (there's no ...


9

Good (not super) quality 64GB cards are around 10 to 14 "generic bucks" (US Dollars, Euros, UKP). "Good quality" defined as "built as designed by a reputable brand, no reason to expect b grade product or counterfeits". This actually puts the usefulness of reusing them at all in question - instead of using them once, periodically downloading and until they ...


9

The answer to pretty much all your questions is one word: video. Exact details of bit rates, video formats and whatever else are off-topic on this site which is about still photography so I won't go into it here, but basically you don't need to worry about this unless you intend to shoot video. One thing to note though: the speeds quoted for SD cards are ...


8

The problem is that those reasons don't apply and if they did more consumers would be willing to pay out for better cameras with those features and the others that come with more expensive kit. If an SD card becomes corrupt, an amateur has plenty of time to change cards and less need to guarantee capturing the action such as at an event. If an amateur ...


8

I've read that the performance is indeed comparable (at least from reputable vendors), so that makes the only real factors the form factor and the price. I find using an adapter a mild inconvenience, since it's one more thing to worry about, but I don't think that's a big deal. I also don't think "future proofing" is a big deal either, since cards don't ...


7

A micro SD to SD card adapter is a passive device, i.e. it does nothing but provide a set of contact points bridging those on the micro SD card and those on the SD slot. That being the case, it should pretty much either work or not work, but won't impact performance... unless you find one of such low quality that the contacts fail to accomplish their simple ...


7

Note: the links in the list below are likely to go stale, as manufacturers and distributors often change their numbering/indexing; and as parts go out of production. Not knowing which manufacturer(s) provides the CF/SD card connectors for your camera, the best you can do is find datasheet specs from a wide variety of manufacturers, and make your own best ...


7

Micro SD to SD adaptors are just passive wiring adaptors. So they should not have any impact on speed.


7

If you want to get an idea of the probability and cost to recover your data, open up the card enclosure to see what's inside. It should look similar to this: Typically, you have a flash controller chip on top (near the contacts), and memory chips below. The controller doesn't store anything and is typically discarded during recovery even if it still works. ...


7

Not a definitive answer, but I'm a fan of using the USB connection first. My thinking is that if the USB port suffers mechanical failure, you'll still be able to charge and export files externally, but if the battery or card compartment breaks, you're without a functioning camera. To put it another way : Durability [external] = Durability [card slot + ...


6

The cards are considerably more complicated electronically. Additional power would be needed to drive the ARM processor vs. a typical SD controller. Once you add in Wi-Fi radio and the encryption requirements that come with it you should expect an impact on battery life (though most cards now shut down Wi-Fi when it is not transmitting which helps.) The ...


6

In general the top tier Compact Flash cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels when compared to the top tier Secure Digital cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels are: More rigid and less susceptible to damage from flexing Rated for more extreme environmental conditions (higher altitude, lower temperature, etc.) Have ...


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