Hot answers tagged

50

Yes, there's something you can do. Stop using the card and replace it. Even reputable, high-quality cards have failures. And every such device has a limited lifespan. Don't risk it. You may do something which will cover up the problem, only for it to reoccur and cause you to lose images. SanDisk offers a long warranty in most countries — depending on the ...


40

Apparently yes: Police announced that part of the SD Card has since been discovered in Wakita's body (some Japanese blogs are reporting that they found it in his, ahem, poop). On the recovered card, officers apparently discovered the peeping pictures in question and arrested Wakita. They are pretty durable things. It sounds like in this case the guy ...


38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


28

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system does ...


26

There are several ways in which an SD card can go bad. Physical Damage First, cards can be actually physically broken. You can bend them in half pretty easily if you try, but in general they're actually pretty resilient. Many are effectively water-proof even if not marketed that way. I've sent cards through the laundry, and once I dropped one full of ...


22

LRV is a Low Resolution Video on the GoPro. You can use it on your not-too-powerful computer, edit, and then for the final render use the original, high resolution video. You can view it by renaming to .mp4


22

Have you checked file extensions? You might have your camera set in the RAW+JPEG storing mode, producing both .JPG and .NEF file for each shot, showing the same thumbnail for both of them. Also many image viewers would show both of them. Solution: Turn off RAW+JPEG mode and use JPEG only mode. Check page 85 of the Nikon D7000 manual - Image Recording ...


20

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


18

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


15

The short answer is that it doesn't really matter. The "protected area" is not important for photography; I'm not aware of any camera that uses it. This area is theoretically used for user-hostile copy protection and is not really for your benefit in any case. When using your camera to store photos, you can just ignore it. The concern about less than ...


15

Most high-end SD cards from a good brand are waterproof. It will survive submerging in a fish tank for weeks, acid proof or not, I don't know. Generic brands or low-end cards are not as well constructed and are NOT waterproof. However, taking the question seriously, since the card ultimately comes out with your waste. I think it would be better to wrap it ...


15

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


12

Yes; I have an EyeFi card and my battery doesn't even stand 50% of its performance. Fortunately I can turn EyeFi-wireless-mode off in my Nikon's D3200 menu. It's described in the user manual here:


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


12

Is there something I can do to solve this situation ? Get another card.


11

Short answer: no. Long answer: no. Your Fujitsu point and shoot camera has a much lower throughput than your card's max, so the bottleneck with shooting lots of pictures very, very quickly will be the camera itself, not the memory card. Additionally, there will be absolutely no difference in image of video quality... this is digital after all.


11

There is an advantage to Compact-Flash cards which you get with the fastest models and sufficiently fast camera. This is not what accounts for most of the price difference, volume is. SD cards are sold on considerably higher volume than CF ones. When CF cards were more popular, it used to be the opposite. Nowadays, I would not worry at all about this. The ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


10

I'm going to answer a different question. :-) Instead of planning to strain my poo for the next few days, I would happily format the card and show the goons. What I would be wagering is that they would not realize how easily one can recover images from a freshly formatted card. If that weren't good enough, I would voluntarily remove the card and give it ...


10

The card has probably developed an error. Flash cards (including SD cards) have a limited number of writes, and, while the expected number is large, sometimes failures happen early. Or it could simply be a manufacturing defect. In either of these cases, Sandisk — which has awesome long warranty periods ­— will probably replace the card, but that doesn't do ...


9

The GoPro HD Hero 2 states on the FAQ page: You will need to get a class-4 or higher SD card from a reputable brand and source in order to use the camera effectively. A class-10 SD card is recommended when using Time-Lapse mode or photo every 0.5 seconds. Class 4 isn't that fast by today's standards, and actually equates to 4MB/s read/write speeds. The ...


9

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less of ...


9

Your camera is probably not the best or fastest USB memory card reader you can own, so even if you are using the fastest card you can buy and the camera claims to be using the fastest USB protocol your computer can handle, it's not very likely that it will give you the best data transfer speeds. A high-quality, high-speed external USB card reader (there's no ...


9

Good (not super) quality 64GB cards are around 10 to 14 "generic bucks" (US Dollars, Euros, UKP). "Good quality" defined as "built as designed by a reputable brand, no reason to expect b grade product or counterfeits". This actually puts the usefulness of reusing them at all in question - instead of using them once, periodically downloading and until they ...


8

In my camera, that's what I have, and I have no problems. At worst, your transfer speeds may be slower. But it will most definitely not affect the images captured.


8

I've read that the performance is indeed comparable (at least from reputable vendors), so that makes the only real factors the form factor and the price. I find using an adapter a mild inconvenience, since it's one more thing to worry about, but I don't think that's a big deal. I also don't think "future proofing" is a big deal either, since cards don't ...


7

I would strongly recommend getting a new card. The danger to the camera, ultimately, is that the card could get stuck in the slot because of the card separating. While I would imagine that Nikon repair could sort that out, it may cost you a lot more than a new card to have it done because such a situation would not be under warranty.


7

The speed of the memory card is definitely one constraining factor but as you suspect there are other bottlenecks. First there is the internal memory buffer of the camera. Each camera only has so much RAM installed. When you shoot this buffer is filled first and the camera does what it can to quickly empty the buffer to allow for more shooting. The size of ...


7

The problem is that those reasons don't apply and if they did more consumers would be willing to pay out for better cameras with those features and the others that come with more expensive kit. If an SD card becomes corrupt, an amateur has plenty of time to change cards and less need to guarantee capturing the action such as at an event. If an amateur ...


7

A micro SD to SD card adapter is a passive device, i.e. it does nothing but provide a set of contact points bridging those on the micro SD card and those on the SD slot. That being the case, it should pretty much either work or not work, but won't impact performance... unless you find one of such low quality that the contacts fail to accomplish their simple ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible