10

No. None being manufactured anymore. The last one was the Fuji Finepix S9000. Believe me, I understand where you are coming from. Memory used to be a big investment, it was $1100 CDN for a 1 GB CF when I purchased one in 2002. Because of this, it was important when changing cameras that you could continue using the same cards. This is no longer the case. ...


9

I have a Canon EOS 1Ds mark 1, and I have recently put in a 32GB card. It is true that in-camera formatting only allows for an 8 GB partition to be created. However, if I re-partition the card on my computer and create a 32 GB partition, the camera will recognize all 32 GB. I have tested filling the card beyond 8 GB, and it still seems to work in the camera....


6

In general the top tier Compact Flash cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels when compared to the top tier Secure Digital cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels are: More rigid and less susceptible to damage from flexing Rated for more extreme environmental conditions (higher altitude, lower temperature, etc.) Have ...


5

File deletion essentially means removing file entry from file system (file system contains information about all location and size of all files on disc or memory card). If something goes wrong file system may become corrupted, rendering card inaccessible (all the data may be still there, but without filesystem you can't tell where one file begins and another ...


5

For video I believe the requirements would be a card that can write 10 MB/s (mega bytes per second). This equals to 66x speed for a Compact Flash card. For shooting stills it's possible to get a longer burst with a faster card. If you want maximum burst length, get the quickest CF card you can afford. The math would be: 66 * 150kB/s = 9900kB/s ~ 10MB/s 66x ...


4

I can't find any specifics for the 7D that are helpful. Normally I would look to the Rob Galbraith CF/SD Performance Database, though the newest cameras aren't listed there. According to the dpreview.com 7D review's performance section, the camera maxed out when shooting raw with a Sandisk Extreme Pro card. So, one conclusion could be that the camera is ...


4

Since neither Windows nor the camera can read the card, I think the most likely scenario is that the changes Windows were about to write to the card were interrupted halfway through. Such interruptions will corrupt a file system for sure, and could happen if you just unplug the card instead of going through the Windows "safely remove hardware and eject ...


4

If I can see my photos in Preview, they must not be deleted, It sounds like your memory card is failing. Preview may be showing you thumbnails from the files which do not require the entire file to be read. Then, when you try to copy the entire file, it turns out there is a read error.


3

All flash memory systems have their physical enclosure and 2 electronic systems - a controller and flash memory to determine reliability. Electronics Electronically there is no discernible difference because the storage side of flash memory (NAND) is the same across all the types (CF, SD, etc.) NAND at the chip level has a serial interface and relies on ...


3

The "Red Eye Reduction" flash setting causes several bright flashes before the photo is taken, with the intention of closing the pupils of people in the photo, reducing the chance of reflection from their retina, which causes the red eye problem. When there is nobody looking at that flash, that effect doesn't happen. It won't hurt the photo, but it wastes ...


3

Why are not all images simply in DCIM? Slightly unhelpful answer: because that would violate the Design rule for Camera File System. Perhaps more helpfully, given that image files can have only 4 numbers in them (again due to the design rule), what would you expect to happen if you have more than 10000 images on one card - perhaps slightly unlikely for a ...


3

The speed at which you can import the photos is governed by the card type and the cable you use to connect to your computer, so first make sure you have the fastest type of card available. Lexar make a Firewire 800 card reader which is stackable, so you can link two or more together as FW800 allows you to daisy chain devices in series. If you use a Mac you ...


2

There seems to be some evolution on that point. Eye-Fi seems to be willing to offer CF support, by certifying CF adapters for their SD Eye-fi, starting March 2015. More infos on their website: http://www.eyefi.com/lp/cf You will find a how-to guide and a list of compatible cameras. And also some words on possible drawbacks, like slower transfer times.


2

As SD cards are getting faster and more common, they should gradually displace CF cards in the professional market. The fastest commonly-available SD cards on the market can reach speeds of up to 100 MB/s, so performance is much less of an issue than it once was. With the introduction of UHS-II (and with Toshiba already having developed a 260 MB/s card), it'...


2

Don't forget, that the USB channel has bandwidth limitations. USB 2.0 spec High Speed is 480 Mbps (megabits per second). This means that an 8GB card can theoretically transfer in 134 seconds. Firewire 800, can do this in 80 seconds (Firewire 400 in 160 sec). Now, this is theoretical, because every USB or Firewire device connnected utilizes bandwidth. If ...


2

CF cards were used back then because they offered higher write speeds than smaller memory cards and some even offered then gigantic capacities by utilizing small hard drive inside. However, these days SD cards rival CF in speed and capacities are already beyond practical. For example, 8GB Class 10 SDHC cards I use in my SDLR hold around 700 raw images per ...


2

I've now successfully upgraded the firmware in my EOS-1Ds using a 8 GB CF card that was formatted in camera to a 2 GB FAT16 partition. The card used was a Trancend CompactFlash 133x 8 GB.


2

My question is, can a card get corrupted by using Windows to delete files from it and how can I try to recover the pictures on it? Yes, a card can get corrupt just by inserting it into a card reader, not only by deleting files. I had a multi-card reader and only the xD slot would corrupt the card. I could view them but once it was taken out it was no longer ...


2

It all depends on the models of the cards and more specifically their read speeds. If the CF has higher read speeds, the only benefit you get is that you'll be offloading files from it faster (but this also depends on the card reader's speed and connection). USB 3.0 has the bandwidth to accommodate even the fastest cards available today; 2.0 can potentially ...


1

I know I am replying to this post late in the game, but it sounds like the card data may still be able to be recovered by a data recovery lab. they would have the expertise to be able to do "surgery" on the card and get to the memory.


1

You need a hard drive that supports USB On the Go, or USB Host mode. Search Amazon for USB OTG, and you will find thousands of adapters, however many of these are advertised for mobile phones. I suspect most will support a USB hard drive, but then you also also will need power, something none of these designed for phones have. You might be able to get a ...


1

You will need some type of intermediate device. Both a CF card and an external hard drive are logically hard disk drives and something has to access one and write the contents to the other. It would be possible to do this with a variety of devices, including USB capable tablets or possibly even a USB capable phone, but some host device is necessary for the ...


1

Opening files from a card on Windows should not corrupt it, since that action is only doing a read, and not altering the contents. You should never format, or delete images on anything other than the camera, primarily because of the various disk formats and implementation of them on computers. Most cameras use the Windows format known as FAT32. This ...


1

I don't know how you could tell the age of the card, but I think it is more important to know roughly how many shots it has recorded, to format it regularly, (the formatting will remove wilting parts of the card), and, depending how often you use it, throwing it away after an amount of time that suits you, ie. a year maybe. Then mark the new one with the ...


1

Compact Flash theoretically has a limit of 128GB or greater. The S1 seems to be 6 megapixels, so on a 4GB card you could hold 600+ images If this is the S1 Pro, then according to this link: Compatible Media (As of July 2000 ): Microdrive: IBM: 340MB; Compact Flash cards: Sandisk: SDCFB-16t32140/48/64/9a1128| | Lexer Media: 4x type 8 MB to 80 MB 8x ...


1

I happened to notice this from the FAQ I referenced in the answer to your last question: Question: If I purchase a high performance CompactFlash card for my E-10/20N, will it reduce the time writing to the media. Answer: No, the writing time is controlled by the camera, not by the Media. In other words, it won't help. (This mentions the "N" ...


1

The E20 FAQ from Olympus says that CompactFlash-interface microdrives up to "1gig" are supported. That doesn't necessarily mean that bigger cards won't work, though — unlike SmartMedia, CF doesn't require device support for larger capacities, since there's a standard interface with "smarts" in the card itself. ("Smartmedia" is an Orwellian misnomer; it's the ...


1

I have one of these and they are great; you can download 4 CF cards at a time: http://www.techchee.com/2008/02/03/delkin-imagerouter-card-reader-connects-multiple-cf-cards/


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