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5

Looking at old pictures helps, I think. If settings are a current difficulty, then looking at the settings helps somewhat. But the relationship between the settings, subject, composition and light is what makes or breaks a picture. To me, there are probably better ways to learn settings: an external light meter and manual mode, for example, will provide a ...


4

If you didn't use a very long lens, chances are, most of the frame was filled with dark night sky. So the camera choose a very long time, probably up to 30 seconds, which can feel long indeed. I suppose while you were waiting, the shutter was actually open. Your observation "it took as soon as I was turning it off" actually supports this, as what ...


3

Yes, but not that often because each picture is different. I do this for rather technical photos where I can't waste shots trying to find ideal settings, for instance trying to catch lightnings, fireworks, or planes in air shows. Reviewing the settings used in previous sessions avoids making the same mistakes again, or lets me reuse good settings from the ...


2

Just putting it in a bag will mitigate the high frequency vibration considerably. Having some foam padding around the camera, as in a usual camera bag, is even better. The big problem will then be sharp impact, either in a fall or when the bag swings against something. If you avoid those you should be OK. You might look into the mirrorless bodies. They ...


2

I think looking at the EXIF can help, particularly if there's something technical you want to pursue/improve in terms of exposure or camera settings. It's also hecka handier than keeping a note, exposure-by-exposure of the settings used, like we had to do back in film days. :) And reviewing older images in general can be helpful to boost your morale when you'...


2

A few things you can try. Make sure the lens is fully seated and when you rotate it you hear the lens release button click (page 27 in your manual). If you can remove your lens without pressing the lens release button, your lens isn't mounted properly. Check the focus mode switches on the body and lens (you indicate you have done this). You may want to ...


1

Because we do not know your style and preferences of cycling and the surface you cycle (asphalt, macadam, offroad, mounting cycling) we have no idea about the amplitude and acceleration of these vibrations. If you cycle with a lot of vibrations will be wise to get tough camera (I prefer Olympus Tough TG serie). They can survive also rain, mud, drop, to say ...


1

I had a similar problem: I basically had to force my camera lens off the body. It was a bit of a risk because I could have broken my camera and my lens. Fortunately it worked. After looking at my camera lens mount, I noticed one of the screws was loose. I tightened that bad boy up, and the problem was solved. I do however agree with @Linwood's answer. It is ...


1

The correct answer totally depends upon the specific lens and also upon the manner in which you desire to use it. Even when using a lens on a tripod, some lenses require you to turn IS off, some do it automatically for you, and others actually have IS modes specifically created for tripod use. The last category includes Canon's Super Telephoto series that ...


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