26

There are several ways in which an SD card can go bad. Physical Damage First, cards can be actually physically broken. You can bend them in half pretty easily if you try, but in general they're actually pretty resilient. Many are effectively water-proof even if not marketed that way. I've sent cards through the laundry, and once I dropped one full of ...


21

Well, for one thing, all photos larger than 16 megapixels are resized to 16 MP — so, for many cameras today, that's an immediate, obvious drop in resolution. But all other photos are compressed too, using an optimizing compression algorithm. I don't think Google comes out and says exactly what they do, but it's probably their open source Guetzli algorithm. ...


17

I'm not going to worry too much about how this happens, because hard disks will fail; just like anything else in this world, they aren't perfect. You can't get to a state where you're never going to lose a file. However, you can get to a state where you never lose a photo - you do this by having multiple copies on separate hard drives, including at least ...


17

There are two main causes. The first is data degradation. Bits stored on magnetic media (such as your hard disk) can lose their magnetic orientation over time, corrupting the bit. In harsher conditions (high heat and humidity) the physical media itself can start to degrade. For solid state media such as an SSD, the mechanism is different but the outcome is ...


6

Short Answer : you may be lucky ! As you supposed, it seems that you have indeed experienced some corruption(s) during the transfer. Technically speaking, a JPG is made of tiny blocks of pixels called "MCU block" (Minimum Coded Unit). In the case of your image, the MCU has the size of 16*8 pixels (regular sizes are 8*8, 8*16 and 16*8). As one can see in ...


6

They are basically throwing processing power at the problem, using very compute intensive approaches that tries out various ways to compress the image within the JPG rules. Processing is something google likely has plenty of, especially as it also saves bandwdith. You can do the same - the software and various services are free or cheap. Your program / ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


5

That's not pink — that's magenta. The difference is significant because magenta is the mix of blue and red primaries, with no green. That implies that the green channel information for that part of the file is damaged. But also, it's pretty clear that most of the image is messed up far beyond beyond that. I'd write this one off as not salvageable. If you ...


5

There may not be a definitive answer. Some arguments for using fewer, larger cards: Less card swapping. When using small cards, you could potentially miss the shot because you have to swap cards. Lower chance of user error. If you have a dozen cards then keeping track of formatted cards, used cards, backed-up cards... is a disaster waiting to happen. And ...


4

An important detail that hasn't been mentioned thus far is how file deletion is (usually) done on SSDs. It is different than the traditional, spinning-disk, hard disk drives (HDDs). As mentioned in AJ's answer, traditionally when you "delete" a file the operating system (Windows 8 in this case) simply tells the hard drive that the file is no longer needed ...


4

It most definitely is a image sensor/CCD/CMOS issue. These tend to fail over time due to heat, which could explain why it worked the first couple of months. It also isn't exposing properly (due to faulty CCD) hence the swirls and exposure of half a second. There was a time where they recalled their image sensors/CCDs but it was a while ago. It might be ...


4

If your intention is to modify the JPEG file by changing some bytes inside it, just do the following: convert JPEG to uncompressed BMP change the bytes convert BMP to JPEG


4

What you're seeing is consistent with data corruption in that the preview lo-res jpeg is fine, and that the compressed raw has a number of incorrect or missing bytes causing corruption. The question Why do images get "corrupted"? describes the effect at the file level. Use of a different file format (raw rather than jpeg) will give you different ...


4

Based on your description of the problem, it sounds like the card in question may have a bad block that isn't being masked out by the card's controller. Since most flash cards use some type of wear leveling, the problem will only occur each time the controller attempts to access the bad block. If the card is, for example, an 8GB card that is re-formatted ...


4

Try a web search for "Hex editor". There are several around, including some free ones. They can display the values of the bytes making up the file as (ususally) hexadecimal (base 16) values - each 8 bit byte shows as 2 hexadecimal digits. Some may also allow you to display the values as octal (base 8) or binary (base 2). As with most editors, you can search ...


3

Your first photos look pretty dramatic, but I think that's actually mostly a side effect of something other than the problem — you are doing it on purpose. I don't mean maliciously, but those are clearly examples where the weird artifacts are combined with a long shutter speed in order to make an interesting abstract effect. The "skeleton" image may be a ...


3

I know that when you repeatedly remove/insert an SD card it can leave "lines" on the gold contacts of the SD card itself but I haven't had any issue with it for over a year (if I'm understanding what you're saying.) Not all SD cards do this and if you're curious check this post out. As for the camera messing up the card itself, do you have any other SD Card ...


3

There are generally two reasons for corruption... The card is faulty. Cards are so cheap relative to cameras that there is no excuse not to follow the 'if in doubt, throw it out' mantra and then you can replace them with cards that do have a warranty. If cards fail it's normally the 'controller' that fails and it will be completely inaccessible. The card ...


3

You've tested with multiple cards/readers. That's definitely indicative of a problem with the camera itself. Some additional tests are:- plug a cable into the camera directly. copy the files to a different machine. You might have a USB problem there that you didn't know about. view the nef using different software (for example ViewNX.) copy the same ...


3

Can I keep using a corrupted SD card? Well, you could. But you might not like the results from doing so. Based on the rest of your description, though, before you toss the card you probably need to establish that the card, and not something else, is the actual source of the problem. Here's a checklist of things you should look at: How was the card ...


2

This same problem has plagued me for months. FINALLY I figured out what the cause was, at least in my situation. Having my printer plugged into one of the USB ports at the same time of transferring photos from camera (or SD card in card reader) is what corrupted my images. When I unplugged my printer, everything worked fine. I could use my camera with ...


2

Moving the card between cameras is not likely to cause a problem. I think that's just a red herring. You might try some different recovery tool, but it seems likely that what you've gotten is as good as it's going to get. Time to get another card, and in the future remember to upload to a computer frequently and keep backups.


2

Sounds to me that it is more likely to have been a failure saving the file over the network. Network backups are nice for archival storage, but horrible for live work due to the extremely slow load times for relatively large files. The process I generally use is to initially transfer my files to my high speed scratch SSD array (striped). I then ...


2

You've deliberately vandalised a compressed file, there is no way to recover the data except for you to put back what you've broken. Image recovery tools are built to work by taking blocks of data and getting them back into the right order; such as when the filesystem is damaged on an SD card or harddisk. They are not designed to correct the kind of damage ...


2

Smaller memory card requires switching cards more often, which can be a limitation. The SanDisk CompactFlash Memory Card Product Manual (available SanDisk CompactFlash Memory Card Product Manualhere : ) gives the following specifications : MTBF > 1,000,000 hours (MTBF=Mean Time Between Failure) Minimum 10,000 insertions So if you are a "regular" ...


2

The answer to the why this happens depends on the type of drive, type of file, filesystem and operating system used, so it's impossible to give a complete answer to this question. But regarding how to avoid this, the other answer touches on having backups - however, with file corruption like this, you need a way to identify when a particular copy of your ...


2

No. It's possible for a bit to be flipped which has no immediately obvious effect. In fact, it's possible for a data error to have no visual effect at all. If reasonably-sized blocks are missing or scrambled in the middle of the file, you'll get the kind of visual artifacts we see in typical questions under data-corruption. If a file is just truncated at ...


2

This has gone unanswered for along time so I'll take a shot at a summary. Most raw files, including as best I know Canon, do not include a checksum in the original file as delivered by the camera, so there is no sure way to know a given copy is correct. Some may be so damaged they fail to import, but often they are wrong when viewed but still "work" in ...


2

If the location is really identical, or a few locations that repeat, this is most likely a sensor problem - probably a solder joint or bond wire that became intermittent. Might be mitigated by measured percussive maintenance, but unlikely to be completely fixable unless you have a spare sensor board, or great SMT rework equipment, or a wire bonder, and in ...


2

Since you've tried multiple readers and computers, and since you've tried card recovery software, I'm afraid the most likely thing is that the card went bad and you've lost the photos. If the photos are absolutely precious, you may want to send it in to a data recovery company. These companies can open up the card and read from the flash chips directly. ...


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