7

Mostly, no. Let me clarify. There are three speed limits: The speed limit of your camera The write speed limit of your card. The read speed of your card. When speed #2 is greater or equal to speed #1, the camera operates at its maximum performance. It will shoot at its highest frame rate until the internal buffer gets full and then slows down while offload ...


7

The speed of the memory card is definitely one constraining factor but as you suspect there are other bottlenecks. First there is the internal memory buffer of the camera. Each camera only has so much RAM installed. When you shoot this buffer is filled first and the camera does what it can to quickly empty the buffer to allow for more shooting. The size of ...


6

Deciding what card to buy for a specific camera in order to get the fastest performance of which the camera is capable without spending more than necessary on a card that is even faster than the camera is capable of taking advantage is a daunting task. Not only can it be very confusing when comparing speeds of various cards, but learning how fast a write ...


5

As with just about any camera, a buffer will be used to hold a number of shots which are written to the card. Once the buffer fills, the frame rate slows. Even with the fastest cards today, previous generation cameras can't offload their buffer fast enough to sustain a high FPS indefinitely. So, this isn't a new problem to the 1D X or D4, though the speed ...


5

Canon 1D X Photo size of this camera should be somewhere in range of 20-30 mb, and with 12 frames per second that sums up to need to write down 300mb/s, or if we consider that the camera has dual card slot, this would amount to 150 mb/s per card (does this work this way?). Is there anything on market that would sustain such a write speed? Short: ...


4

The Canon 500D takes SDHC cards up to 32gb. Any Class 6 or above will make sure that there is never a slow down from the cameras buffer filling up, and the 30MB/s card you mention is a Class 10 card so plenty fast. I just bought two of those myself to replace my 16gb PNY as I get a bit of slow down shooting raw occasionally


4

I have a K-3 with both the "FLUCARD PRO 16 GB O-FC1" and a "SanDisk Extreme" Class 10 80MB/s 32 GB. The SanDisk stores images about twice as fast as my FluCard. I've figured this with the following test: Erase the memory cards. Set the K-3 to manual exposure, 1/500th, Motor Drive H (9 shots/s). Hold down the shutter for as long as the camera takes ...


4

It seems extremely unlikely that Lightroom would include a setting (whether obvious or secret) to deal with this obscure situation. I think you're in a situation where the old joke applies: Doctor! It hurts when I do this! Well, don't do that. You have a workaround. I'd focus on making that as painless as possible.


4

Rob Galbraith has a full spread of tests with just about every popular card for this camera. To sum up the results, the fastest card is the SanDisk Extreme Pro 8GB SDHC card. It performed at 27.7MB/s JPEG and 26.4MB/s RAW for a burst of 39 shots in 30 seconds. The speed test was performed by shooting 17 JPEG Fine and then 10 NEF files. More info can be ...


1

This is normal and expected. It's basically queuing theory. Here's an analogy that might help in visualizing this: If you walk into an empty store (sensor/camera), grab an item (light/data), and get in line (buffer) for the cash register, they'll ring you up right away (write to SD card), and you're on your way. If you walk into a packed supermarket and ...


1

Look at your CPU and RAM usage during a simple export (not a bunch of processor-heavy stuff like noise reduction, moire, clarity). If either CPU or RAM are maxed out they're your bottleneck. Given that 90ish% (or # of cores x 90% for a Mac) is effectively maxed out. Only if both are some distance from maximum should you consider drive speed as a bottleneck. ...


1

There are two things going on when you're shooting a video. Capturing/Processing and writing to the card. Capturing/Processing -- You don't have to worry about this part. A manufacturer of any camera will guarantee that it will be sufficient. So it is a given. Writing -- This is when the data is actually written to the card, and of course not cards are ...


1

Most cameras have an internal buffer they write the pictures to first. From there, the images are written out to the (much slower) memory card. So, if you take pictures at maximum speed, your buffer will be full after some time (My Canon EOS 60D can make about 50 JPEGs or 12 RAW images until the buffer is full). After that, I have to wait until at least ...


1

SD Cards: Your camera can take full advantage of UHS 1 only if it support that protocol. However, in general UHS 1 based cards are faster than normal class 10 cards (and expensive as well). For example, I have two cards. First one is Sandisk Extreme, a class 10 card with data transfer upto 45 MB/s. It also support UHS 1 protocol. My second card is Transcend ...


1

From what I could find on the different modes of your camera it looks like one of the limiting factors is the speed of your SD card. I couldn't find any specs about the cameras writing speed limitations, but it would surprise me if you don't see an (small) speed-up with a faster SD card. Have you tried to "only" take 5-10 pictures while in Top 20/40 mode, ...


1

The camera's buffer is most likely the bottleneck. Using a 133x card the dpreview.com review achieved the same 10 RAW frames. From the review: The D7000's buffer is smaller than the D300S as well. We found that even with a fast card, no more than 32 pictures can be taken in a burst at the maximum frame rate before the camera has to slow to clear the ...


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