50

From what I see this is element from the shutter. And my humble advise is to send your camera to repair shop, give it in to the hands of professional, do not try to repair it.


38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


28

I have the same lens. Your front element is not broken From your photo it looks like only a protective filter (UV?) broke. Notice the letters saying "16-35mm". They are printed on the outside of the lens, not behind the front element. It appears the filter mount ring is still attached, making the front of the lens look a little deeper than ...


22

At very wide angles the danger is much less and taking photos with the sun in the field of view doesn't normally harm the camera or lens. When the sun is very low on the horizon the energy is also reduced as there is much more of Earth's atmosphere to absorb much of that energy between an observer on the ground than when the sun is high in the sky. More ...


21

The item obstructing the sensor is a shutter blade. Your shutter has failed and needs to be replaced. There's no hack or DYI solution for this problem. This is a hardware problem and not something that can be fixed with software or some kind of hack. You should expect repairs to be in the $200+ price range. Since you can buy a used XTi for under $150, ...


19

Provided your lens isn't a power zoom (fairly rare, these lenses have motors that drive the zoom mechanism), then no you will not damage either camera or lens.


17

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


16

Storing the lens in the refrigerator for a month or even indefinitely at 43° will not harm it in any way. What could potentially damage it is removing it from that environment without taking adequate precautions. Any time you move your camera or lens from a cold environment, such as your refrigerator, to a warmer one you should be sure to place it in a ...


16

You've got the right approach, but given that the electronics were powered up when the camera took it's swim in the sea, I think it's quite unlikely you'll restore function. Probably the best you can hope for, if the camera was wet inside, is to recover the images from the memory card.


15

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


15

Don't worry about it. No, really, don't worry about it, and certainly don't panic. All that's going to happen if somebody touches a lens's glass is that it will get a bit of oil and muck on it, and that can trivially be cleaned off as you've already done.


14

The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "Am I sure the only damage to the lens is to the mounting flange?" The second thing you need to ask yourself is, "Considering the cost of a new EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 is only around $200 and a used one can be found for half that, why would I consider sending the lens in for a repair that will likely cost near that ...


12

Here is a methodology to find it: Prepare a white screen on you computer, for example a white document in GIMP. Take an out-of-focus photo, for example, focus at infinity and the widest aperture to avoid vignetting. Use different settings. Overexpose until the histogram is almost to the right. Underexpose until the histogram is almost to the left. Open the ...


12

I'm answering the question based on if it wasn't the UV filter you broke, in case anyone stumbles here in the future. Can I get it repaired? This honestly depends on the age of the lens. For example the Canon 16-35 f2.8L (mark I) was discontinued in about 2007. Replacement parts may not be easy to come by, and due to front element diameter, definitly ...


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


11

Yes, the Wein Safesync is designed to do exactly that: http://www.weinproducts.com/safesyncs.htm


11

Whenever you're freelensing (holding the lens against the camera, rather than securing mounting it), you do run the danger of getting stuff inside the camera body (including stray light), but as long as you watched out to make sure nothing comes in contact with the lens elements, you probably aren't damaging your lens. The main "issues" (or features, ...


11

Although it is hard to tell for certain from the included image, it looks like the only thing broken is a filter placed on the end of the lens. The first element of the EF 85mm f/1.8 lens itself is just past the ring of baffles below your broken filter. Remove the filter ring, clean off any remaining pieces of the filter being careful not to scratch your ...


10

As long as you aren't pointing the camera at the sun, lasers etc. (see this question) You should be ok, at worst you'll get a completely over exposed image and the camera may give an over heating warning or the battery will run flat. This is based on the general consensus (google to the rescue): http://www.photographyblogger.net/six-common-myths-about-...


10

Up until the late 1940s and into the 1950s, camera lenses didn't have coatings. The result was much higher incidence of lens flare and reduced contrast in the presence of bright light sources. Touching a lens with your fingertips will not remove the coating! Lens coatings are much harder to remove than that, and would generally require some kind of abrasive ...


10

Check if you can somehow get this replaced/repaired for free by some expert due to warranty, insurance, etc. That would be the best solution. Find out the price that an expert repair costs or at least get an estimate and compare it to what a used lens costs. To know what the prices are for a non DIY solution. Take a flat srew driver or any other stiff/rigid ...


9

The first one isn't a setting/exposure issue as there are stripes/lines across the picture. From my technical experience, I'm willing to bet it's a faulty image sensor. If you Google images "faulty ccd", you can see very similar results. This fault isn't necessarily caused by damage to the camera but just simply due to the image sensor failing. Although I ...


9

1: this is what tripods are designed to do 2: you're worried about standing a tripod on its legs? 3: the legs will naturally loosen a little with use, so this isn't unexpected 4: is risky because, especially with a ball head, the camera can slip out of position and hit the tripod itself (the risk is to the camera more than the tripod). There is also a ...


9

Not unless you drop the lens while removing it because you don't have enough hands to hold everything. Seriously, no you can't damage a Canon EOS lens using this procedure. Canon EOS lenses are designed in such a way that the diaphragm is moved in both directions by a micro servo attached to the diaphragm assembly. Unlike many lens designs, there are no ...


9

The direct view intensity of an indoor electric lamp is generally lower than that of a specular reflection (say, from a car window or chrome hubcap) of the sun when outdoors -- but we don't see loud cautions from camera or sensor manufacturers warning against exposing images that might include reflections of the sun. In practice, there is only one kind of ...


9

It's toast. Salt water is the most corrosive thing you can do to the electronics inside a DSLR that doesn't involve a vat of strong acid. Roger Cicala, the founder of lensrentals.com, has posted at least two blog entries regarding teardowns he did of rental cameras returned after having been exposed to salt water without having actually been submerged in it. ...


8

I'm not entirely sure if @StanRogers answer covers it entirely so I'll add this. When you use compressed air canisters several things happen besides the blast of air which can (as Stan describes) remove things like the thin film coating. First, the gas, stored under pressure expands quickly, this gas expands because its heating up and has room (less ...


8

Since you are talking in the context of long exposure shots, there are two possible scenarios when Long Exposure Noise Reduction (LENR) is enabled: 1. The shutter is still open and recording the scene. In this case, if you turn off the camera the shutter will close immediately and the exposure in progress will be recorded. No LENR dark frame will be ...


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