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53

The general reccomendation is a 3-2-1 Backup strategy, meaning you have 3 copies: 2 local, 1 offsite. Here's one way: Get a NAS appliance (like a Drobo) to protect against a single disk crash (or just an external disk, with no single disk failure protection) Add an Apple Time Machine to get your 2nd local copy. If Time Machine is not for you, get ...


23

TURN OFF WIFI. I struggled with this too but if you disable wifi and reconnect the USB you should be fine.


23

Luna 3 did something as complicated as you thought: It took photos on a film, processed it in a kind of onboard minilab, and then scanned and radioed it back home in analog way not unlike an old fax. Funniest part was that Soviets didn't have the technology of radiation-hardened film, but Americans did. They used it against Soviets in high-altitude spy ...


22

Perhaps I'm a bit old-school in this way, but I personally avoid storing my stuff on "somebody else's computer" (a.k.a. the "cloud"). I would just buy (at least) two external drives of sufficient capacity - storage is cheap these days. Back up all your images onto one, and then make a copy of that drive on the other, so you have two copies. Generate a ...


20

Amongst the myriad online pages documenting the Viking series, here's one which states clearly The Viking Lander camera design was very different from vidicon framing or CCD array cameras. The lander camera was a facsimile camera with a single, stationary photosensor array (PSA), and azimuth and elevation scanning mechanisms. A lander image was ...


15

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


14

It sounds like what you want is an Eye-Fi card. This will wirelessly transmit the photos you take as you walk round back to your PC. If you go for this option though you will need to use one of Canon's xxxxD or xxxD series cameras as it's SD Card only at the moment - no Compact Flash card option... (Thus, 7D / 5D series / 50D and before / 1D series can't ...


14

If you are talking about JPEG files, then the utility jpeginfo is exactly what you're looking for. It can check files for different types of JPEG errors and corruption and either return an error code (the most useful thing for scripting), or just delete files with errors. I use this as part of my initial file transfer, to make sure everything copied okay ...


10

You need to install Canon's EOS Utility in order to download the pictures directly from the camera. Canon DSLR cameras do not appear as generic logical drives like some other manufacturers' DSLRs. EOS Utility is included on the disc that came with the camera. Updates are downloadable at Canon's website (under the software tab, rather than the drivers tab), ...


10

It is not possible to transfer images out of the memory card faster than its maximum read speed. All you need then is a sufficiently fast card reader. With USB 3.0, there is enough bandwidth to exceed the transfer speed of the fastest current Compact Flash and SDXC cards. Lexar claims 500 MB/s top speed which is faster than Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mb/s = 128 ...


9

The easiest and faster way to backup is an external drive. 400 Gb is not that much and 1 Tb hard drives are pretty cheap. You could backup on two external hard drives and store one in a different place like a family member, in case (let's hope not) something happens like a burglar. The other option is online storage, but 400 Gb is too much for a free ...


8

With Amazon Prime you can store an unlimited amount of Photos incl. Raw Files! https://www.amazon.de/b?ie=UTF8&node=12153288031


7

Using an 'eyefi' add in card would give you maximum flexibility in camera choice as the majority of cameras do not have integral WiFi and you are very greatly limiting your choice this way. HOWEVER Depending on application, an excellent sounding candidate is Ricoh's G700SE Ricoh G700SE home page Specifications Features page including - Despite its ...


7

You must install EOS Utility to download pictures directly from the camera. Your computer will not recognize it as a generic drive. EOS Utility will also give you the ability to shoot tethered and control the camera from your computer. Your other option is to use a card reader instead. Does Canon not have a PTP/Mass Storage connection preference? Serious ...


7

Keep in mind that the memory card in the camera is just a standard removable data storage device, and the photos on the memory card are just standard files. You don't need any special software to transfer files like this. Take the memory card out of the camera and just use a card reader.


6

You could turn your device into a Wifi hotspot and then EyeFi can connect to the internet via your phone (or tablet). I don't have any experience with Eye Fi specifically, but presumably its programmed to scan for a list of known wifi hotspots. I would imagine you could program it to find your phone consistently and then once your device is enabled as a ...


6

Short Answer : you may be lucky ! As you supposed, it seems that you have indeed experienced some corruption(s) during the transfer. Technically speaking, a JPG is made of tiny blocks of pixels called "MCU block" (Minimum Coded Unit). In the case of your image, the MCU has the size of 16*8 pixels (regular sizes are 8*8, 8*16 and 16*8). As one can see in ...


6

Get Google Photos. It's free, it's easy, and once you set it up then future backups are automatic.


5

This is not a bug. On the Canon 6D, USB file transfer is disabled when Wi-Fi is enabled. Try disabling the Wi-Fi first. Good Luck!


5

Short answer: It Works Great I have regularly used an iPad as storage while on holiday, and it's worked fine. As far as I have been able to tell, it copies the whole RAW file over. I plug my 5D mkII into the iPad using the USB dongle. It also makes a great previewing device. Of course, I make sure I have 2 copies of everything, so I don't delete the ...


5

There are a number of software programs that will handle tethered shooting: Lightroom 4, Phase One software's Capture One (which will also wireless transmit images to an iPad using Capture Pilot. These are full blown editing suites however. If you just want simple transfer, what about an Eye-Fi card? They have a direct mode which will send images ...


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

Canon has a detailed manual available for the Wifi functionality of the 6D. You can both remotely operate the camera with EOS utility over Wifi and share photos with computers or smart phones. You can also do remote shooting from a smart phone.


5

It sounds like you were shooting RAW images. These types of files are not directly viewable without special software that understands how your camera works and how to interpret the data from the sensor. They offer a lot of strengths over JPEG, such as being able to adjust white balance and recover from some over or under-exposure much more easily, however ...


5

The image was corrupted by random bytes of information being lost in the data transfer. You can tell because each time information is lost, the image shifts (because pixels end up missing as it fills each line). It's also not an even number of pixel information since some of the times that information is lost, it causes the color information to get shifted ...


5

I was searching for something similar and found this GitHub repository, which was someone's attempt to reverse engineer the wi-fi protocol with the Fujifilm X-T10.


5

USB mass storage is exactly what it sounds like: your camera presents its storage to the computer as a removable drive. This means you can poke around in parts of the storage the camera would really rather you didn't, re-format with the filesystem of your choice, copy files other than images to and from the camera, and in general treat the camera as a funny-...


5

On android make sure your phone supports USB otg. Just do a search for usb otg in your app store. You can download an app and it should be able to tell you. Then buy an otg card reader. You'll probably need to find a file manager app that can access it. It's pretty safe to say that the most popular ones probably already have that functionality. No idea on ...


4

I don't know of any, but you can get an EyeFi card for any rugged camera that takes SD. http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=eyefi


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