22

Have you checked file extensions? You might have your camera set in the RAW+JPEG storing mode, producing both .JPG and .NEF file for each shot, showing the same thumbnail for both of them. Also many image viewers would show both of them. Solution: Turn off RAW+JPEG mode and use JPEG only mode. Check page 85 of the Nikon D7000 manual - Image Recording ...


18

This is in the Exif standard for metadata, on page 26: ResolutionUnit The unit for measuring XResolution and YResolution. The same unit is used for both XResolution and YResolution. If the image resolution in unknown, 2 (inches) is designated. Tag = 296 (128.H) Type = ...


15

If you are talking about JPEG files, then the utility jpeginfo is exactly what you're looking for. It can check files for different types of JPEG errors and corruption and either return an error code (the most useful thing for scripting), or just delete files with errors. I use this as part of my initial file transfer, to make sure everything copied okay ...


14

ExifTool is pretty much the Swiss army chainsaw for doing these kinds of things. It has a steep learning curve, but once you're over it, the kind of renaming you're after is a snap: exiftool -d '%Y%m%d-%H%M%%-03.c.%%e' '-filename<CreateDate' . The -d switch tells ExifTool to format dates according to the next argument's pattern. The pattern contains ...


9

I wrote a script in Python to do the work for me. It's called remove-orphaned-raw-images.py and I published it on Github. Basically it iterates over all the files in a given folder and moves orphaned raw images (in my case *.CR2 files with no matching JPEG) to a backup folder. Optionally you can tell the script to actually delete the files. Here is an ...


8

After looking for a while I found the perfect solution. This program does exactly what I wanted and it's free: http://www.duplicate-finder.com/photo.html


7

I think this question can have better answers in another site, like Security StackExchange. And there you'll get answers that, in the end, will tell you the following: it's impossible. If you really don't want anyone to copy your pictures, you can't let that person touch it. Then the long answer will be the following: Security is a matter of trade-off: you ...


7

If the images actually are duplicates then the additional data is most likely to be metadata which has been added at some point. In other words the files have been modified, although the picture itself has not been touched. Most likely an automated function in your photo viewing/management software has done it. For example facial recognition which is ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


7

Darktable has two distinct operations: Remove and Delete/Trash. By default, the DEL key is bound to the former. That just removes the information about that file from the database, and doesn't affect the actual file. You can change this in the preferences under shortcuts: Double-click on the "delete from disk or send to trash" line and then press DEL. Now, ...


6

I've been using visipics which i found out about on lifehacker which works very well. This is the excerpt from the site I recommend VisiPics (pictured above). It scans the actual photo content of each image file, and so can take some time to tally up its findings if you've got a huge, huge database, but you can fairly easily let it run in the ...


6

I'm using Aperture too. Here's is my far-from-perfect workflow. It works for me, but not always. My point is to start trashing as many shots as possible, and to keep only good or important ones, so later I can give more attention and time to a small, manageable, number of really good ones. Important: I'm using a managed aperture library, so I keep ...


6

Well, just an idea: print cards with your email. Write a number and a password in each card. The numbers must be consecutive and you should use them in order. Every time you meet a new subject, take a picture of a card and give it to him/her. They just need to send you an email indicating the number and the password. The number will help you to find the ...


5

I don't think there is a field in the metadata which explicity defines the crop aspect ratio, but there are plenty of other fields which you could use instead; e.g. 'Instructions' where you could manually add the aspect ratio. You can use 'Sync (metadata)' to apply a crop ratio to the relevant images to avoid typing it in more than once. Then just add '...


5

Step 1 - Move the files to the new location. It's important to a) Ensure they no longer exist at the original location, and be preserve their organization (ie. folder structure) on the destination. Step 2 - Start Lightroom. Be sure you are in Library view. If you've moved entire folders... Step 3 - At the left, under Folders, navigate to the top-level ...


5

Interestingly, I also found the same blog when starting out with Lightroom. There are many ways to get images organized and I found have a file-system structure is very helpful. First is that the filesystem structure is accessible without Lightroom to every other program. You can use it to quickly located images without having to load Lightroom and wait for ...


5

For those who have done the same mistake here is how to proceed: In the Library view, right click on a folder and select Synchronize... Check both Import new photos and Show import dialog before importing checkboxes and press Synchronize button On the import view, check Add to collection on the right pane and create a new collection and click on the Import ...


5

There are certain types of drives that Picasa refuses to list in its "Folder Manager" – generally these are drives formatted with the exFAT file-system, commonly used on USB sticks. There are two possible workarounds to handle the issue: 1. Manually edit watchedfolders.txt If you locate and access: C:\Users\YOUR-NAME\AppData\Local\Google\Picasa2Albums\...


5

Exiftool reads many raw formats. You can use a command similar to this one to rename your photo files : exiftool '-filename<CreateDate' -d %y%m%d_%H%M%S%%-c.%%le -r -ext cr2 /path/to/pictures Change cr2 to whatever your raw extension is, and /path/to/pictures to the desired folder. Once renamed, you can sort them by name. There are more examples ...


5

For simple things where the flexibility, power, and complication of ExifTool aren't necessary, I like to use the tool jhead. It's a command-line tool available for Linux, Mac, and Windows. jhead -n%Y%m%d-%H%M%S *.jpg will automatically rename all files ending in .jpg in the current directory to a format like 20181226-111141.jpg. You can use %f to also ...


4

I don't like filling my library and hard disk with thumbnails and library data for tons of images that failed. So I use my own Image View Plus More (free to download) to sift through my RAW images before importing to Lightroom, because Lightroom is just too slow with imports, thumbnail generation etc. Imgview+ works directly on the compactflash card. If I ...


4

The MetaDataWorking Group, section 5.9 (face regions), is the best standard going forward for managing people tags. Right now Picasa, MS Photo Gallery and Fotobounce support this standard. Hopefully Adobe will jump on board since they are on the committee for this standard...


4

You should decouple three programming concerns. (I use Linux commands, but they work with Cygwin and MinGW, too). Finding and listing files. This can be done with find -iname "..." through folders. Extracting EXIF data. This can be done with exiftool. 1+2 can be easily coupled with xargs. E.g. this command lists all tags related to "Date" (it is one line, ...


4

I think you have three options here, given your desired workflow: A. Before importing, delete the images you don't want to keep from the card, either in-camera or via a photo viewer on your computer. This makes me a little bit squeamish, not because this is likely to cause bugs or make the card go bad but because there's a lot of room for human error and ...


4

There isn't one, overall. I don't think anything focuses on this specifically. Any distro can work just fine, and I suggest picking one that you like in general and the photography apps will follow. That said, there are two considerations that are probably worth... considering. First, unless you plan to find and compile various software yourself, you want ...


4

The camera is a very poor tool for organizing photos, even if your camera did have a way to name folders it would have been painful to use because of the small screen and no keyboard. But you can shoot photos that will help you organize the pictures later, a common trick is to shoot a picture of your hand before each photo set so you can easily see where ...


4

You didn't mention your DAM in text but since you speak about Darktable in title, I assume that this is your program of choice. I think that (a variant of) 1. is the most recommended method since SQLite (Darktable's DB backend) allows (some sort of) multi-concurrency. More technical details: SQLite allows simultaneous reads but just one writer because the ...


4

Use NTFS unless you plan on connecting this drive to a system which only supports FAT. Also, set the Allocation Unit Size as high as possible per http://www.howtogeek.com/136078/what-should-i-set-the-allocation-unit-size-to-when-formatting/ For a media disk where you photos, music and videos are stored, every file is at least 1MB I use the biggest AUS. ...


4

Lightroom is strongest in VIRTUAL organization. You have numerous choices, among them (and not mutually exclusive): You can physically (on disk) organize in any way convenient; I personally prefer by date shot Photos can be given keywords, such as "Soccer" or "Picnic". Those could actually be a specific event "Family Reunion 2016" but generally these are ...


4

From MSDN Knowledge Database System.Image.ResolutionUnit Indicates the resolution units. Used for images with a non-square aspect ratio, but without meaningful absolute dimensions. 1 = No absolute unit of measurement. 2 = Inches. 3 = Centimeters. The default value is 2 (Inches).


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