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32

CIPA (the Camera & Imaging Products Association) has long established DSC as meaning Digital Still Camera. This prefix is not mandated by the DCF (Digital Camera Filesystem) standard but was adopted uniformly by Nikon and Fuji which named their files starting with DSC_, DSCN, or DSCF. Other manufactures went with PICT, PIC or P which presumable all stand ...


22

Have you checked file extensions? You might have your camera set in the RAW+JPEG storing mode, producing both .JPG and .NEF file for each shot, showing the same thumbnail for both of them. Also many image viewers would show both of them. Solution: Turn off RAW+JPEG mode and use JPEG only mode. Check page 85 of the Nikon D7000 manual - Image Recording ...


19

Adobe's XMP metadata standard supports information defined by the Metadata Working Group (MWG), which includes a definition of how to store face tagged data. See: Adobe XMP: http://www.adobe.com/products/xmp/standards.html MWG: http://www.metadataworkinggroup.com/ where you can click on the specifications, download the PDF, and then look at page 51 ...


18

This is in the Exif standard for metadata, on page 26: ResolutionUnit The unit for measuring XResolution and YResolution. The same unit is used for both XResolution and YResolution. If the image resolution in unknown, 2 (inches) is designated. Tag = 296 (128.H) Type = ...


16

The easiest way to do this is using a smart collection. You can use the Has Adjustments filter to show just edited photos, or the Edit Date filter to choose photos edited within a specific time period. I have a smart collection called "Edited this week" which is great for easily getting back to the photos I've recently worked on.


15

If you are talking about JPEG files, then the utility jpeginfo is exactly what you're looking for. It can check files for different types of JPEG errors and corruption and either return an error code (the most useful thing for scripting), or just delete files with errors. I use this as part of my initial file transfer, to make sure everything copied okay ...


13

My solution for this was to purchase Lightroom. My reasoning: Lightroom's workflow is an awesome solution for this problem. It's not too expensive (certainly not cheap either though). It's a one time cost that saves be a lot of time. Details... Lightroom allows you to run through and flag your images (Yes/No/Unflagged) using keyboard shortcuts, so I take ...


13

Personally I would say no , do not import back into Lightroom. As you say - you have the originals. And Lightroom does show you by default the 'latest version', so effectively, what you have exported. Just with the option to go back, edit, change, etc.. What I do is have a Lightroom Exports folder with my exported JPG files. I do not clear this out ...


12

Lightroom is the way to go. Download the trial and give it a try, though I do recommend reading a bit or watching a few videos first to get the most out of your trial. Lightroom will let you do whatever you wish on the file system side, and then offer flexibility beyond it. This is important, because this NAS won't be your last, and in fact, you may have ...


11

ExifTool is pretty much the Swiss army chainsaw for doing these kinds of things. It has a steep learning curve, but once you're over it, the kind of renaming you're after is a snap: exiftool -d '%Y%m%d-%H%M%%-03.c.%%e' '-filename<CreateDate' . The -d switch tells ExifTool to format dates according to the next argument's pattern. The pattern contains ...


9

I wrote a script in Python to do the work for me. It's called remove-orphaned-raw-images.py and I published it on Github. Basically it iterates over all the files in a given folder and moves orphaned raw images (in my case *.CR2 files with no matching JPEG) to a backup folder. Optionally you can tell the script to actually delete the files. Here is an ...


7

According to Wikipedia, the Sony Cyber-shot cameras use the same prefix: All Cyber-shot models have a DSC prefix in their names, which is an acronym for "Digital Still Camera". I suspect Nikon adopted the same convention.


7

After looking for a while I found the perfect solution. This program does exactly what I wanted and it's free: http://www.duplicate-finder.com/photo.html


7

I used Picasa from Google for quite a while before deciding to move to Lightroom. It's free. Good tagging options Decent editing options (but really only for basic editing)


7

I think this question can have better answers in another site, like Security StackExchange. And there you'll get answers that, in the end, will tell you the following: it's impossible. If you really don't want anyone to copy your pictures, you can't let that person touch it. Then the long answer will be the following: Security is a matter of trade-off: you ...


7

If the images actually are duplicates then the additional data is most likely to be metadata which has been added at some point. In other words the files have been modified, although the picture itself has not been touched. Most likely an automated function in your photo viewing/management software has done it. For example facial recognition which is ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


6

No. it will not damage your card or camera. The worst case scenario is that the camera would stop reading the card and the solution is to copy anything important on the card to your computer and format the card in camera. I've been doing this for years with lots of different cameras and never had any problem.


6

I have created privately shared folders in Dropbox, which works very well. If your customer also has a Dropbox account, the folder shows on his account view as well. You can also use a temporary file share service like Dropsend, which I use frequently when an image is larger than the Gmail limit. Both of these services have free as well as paid options. If ...


6

I'm using Aperture too. Here's is my far-from-perfect workflow. It works for me, but not always. My point is to start trashing as many shots as possible, and to keep only good or important ones, so later I can give more attention and time to a small, manageable, number of really good ones. Important: I'm using a managed aperture library, so I keep ...


6

Well, just an idea: print cards with your email. Write a number and a password in each card. The numbers must be consecutive and you should use them in order. Every time you meet a new subject, take a picture of a card and give it to him/her. They just need to send you an email indicating the number and the password. The number will help you to find the ...


6

Darktable has two distinct operations: Remove and Delete/Trash. By default, the DEL key is bound to the former. That just removes the information about that file from the database, and doesn't affect the actual file. You can change this in the preferences under shortcuts: Double-click on the "delete from disk or send to trash" line and then press DEL. Now, ...


5

I've been using visipics which i found out about on lifehacker which works very well. This is the excerpt from the site I recommend VisiPics (pictured above). It scans the actual photo content of each image file, and so can take some time to tally up its findings if you've got a huge, huge database, but you can fairly easily let it run in the ...


5

I don't tend to asset tag any of my camera equipment as it does not lend itself to tagging. I simply enter the serial numbers of the asset into my asset register instead. This is sufficient as the asset register is just a means of tracking fixed assets owned by your company and serial numbers are a valid way to do this.


5

Instead of hunting down perfect solution with bunch of different software Why don't you: Install Lightroom on both systems (call Adobe about PC/MAC user licensing, not exactly sure if they will let you use your license on different OS, download trial versions for each OS and use your serial number on both, see if that works, if not call and complain) ...


5

You can reorganize folders quite easily within Lightroom -- just drag and drop. The trick is simply to do all of the work in Lightroom so that it understands where you're moving photos to and can keep the database updated. (That is, do not go to Finder or Explorer and start dragging folders around.) In the Folders panel in the Library module, I'd go about ...


5

Using the question you mentioned - I have written you a script ok warning! be careful with this script! - MAKE A BACKUP 1) Make a bat file called clean.bat and put it in the dir that you want to work with 2) Then enter the following into the bat file mkdir keep for /f "delims==" %%r in ('dir /b *.jpg') do move "%%~dpr%%~nr.nef" "%CD%\keep\" 2> nul ...


5

I don't think there is a field in the metadata which explicity defines the crop aspect ratio, but there are plenty of other fields which you could use instead; e.g. 'Instructions' where you could manually add the aspect ratio. You can use 'Sync (metadata)' to apply a crop ratio to the relevant images to avoid typing it in more than once. Then just add '...


5

Step 1 - Move the files to the new location. It's important to a) Ensure they no longer exist at the original location, and be preserve their organization (ie. folder structure) on the destination. Step 2 - Start Lightroom. Be sure you are in Library view. If you've moved entire folders... Step 3 - At the left, under Folders, navigate to the top-level ...


5

Interestingly, I also found the same blog when starting out with Lightroom. There are many ways to get images organized and I found have a file-system structure is very helpful. First is that the filesystem structure is accessible without Lightroom to every other program. You can use it to quickly located images without having to load Lightroom and wait for ...


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