24

The 24-70 is an incredibly good lens - it's as sharp wide-open as just about any prime at every focal length across just about its entire field. But it's only 24-70. As you're talking about a full-frame Canon, that's as wide (16mm * crop factor of 1.5 = 24mm), but you'll be losing a lot of length at the telephoto end - your 90mm on APS-C is equivalent to ...


22

It's hard to really tell from the small versions here — which is a lesson in itself, because at 1280x850, which is a perfectly fine online viewing size, the differences really don't matter that much. However, in this case, I think Auto probably did make some better choices. Shutter Speed You picked ¹⁄₆₀th of a second. This is fine, but probably slightly ...


20

There is NO difference at ALL because the physical aperture has not changed. The Fuji Finepix S4000 simulates a small aperture using an ND filter. When you stop-down the ND filter slides into the optical path. The Aperture written in the EXIF data is adjusted to reflect the transmittance of the ND filter, but note that since the size of the opening has not ...


18

Use more light. Open windows, turn on more room lights, bring in extra portable lights. Use a flash. You say there is "no chance" to use a flash, but since you gave no justification for that it remains valid advice. Added: I just looked at the manual you linked to, and right on the front page it clearly shows a popup flash. A spot light from almost ...


18

As you can see in the image below from the service manual, the volume behind these two features is occupied by the view finder assembly. Image source: manualslib.com Image source: manualslib.com The round hole is for one of the two optical paths of the range finder optics. The white rectangle is used as a light source for the frame line indications inside ...


16

I don't know what is required to recognize the "foreign" image, probably something in the Exif... but for your goal, just create the image with your message, with appropriate background, and take a picture of it when showing on the home computer screen. Then it is already in the camera.


15

How to disassemble / take apart Fujifilm X-T1 and how to disable ISO Dial lock switch. It is relatively easy to take apart FujiFilm X-T1. You only need one type of screwdriver, although the screws themselves are different. So as usual, make sure to have several small containers and a piece of paper to write down/draw where a particular screw came from. It ...


14

Would switching to full frame Canon and getting that lens be an upgrade over my Fujifilm gear? For some shooters it would be. For others it would not. For a true photographer it shouldn't make a ton of difference either way. They'll do good work with either. One system may make doing that work easier than the other, but the work you are describing can be ...


14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


13

FujiFilm charges more for lenses (than Canon) because they can. FujiFilm has a near monopoly on X-mount lenses. Other options include cheap manual lenses and expensive Zeiss lenses. This is changing somewhat with the introduction of Viltrox autofocus lenses. Image quality of FujiFilm lenses is nearly guaranteed to be very good. Even XC lenses perform above ...


12

Portra is a low-contrast, low-saturation film made primarily for wedding and portrait photographers (it's the successor to Vericolor III Professional). It's designed to capture the details in both the white wedding dress and the black tuxedo at the same time, while rendering pleasing, blemish-minimized skin tones. There's nothing special about its grain ...


10

"R" stands for Ring and means the lens is equipped with an aperture ring. (From Fujifilm's FAQ.)


10

From 3.2 to 1.8 is a little over 3 times the amount of light - yeah, it makes a difference. If you still want something that is a pocketable camera, but great quality look at the Sony RX100 (review here). The Fuji you have has a really small sensor, which is going to limit low-light ISO performance. The RX100 has a sensor 4 times larger than your Fuji. Not ...


10

This is actually a characteristic of the leaf shutter used in Fuji's X10/X20/X30 and X100 cameras. The leaf shutter can only travel so quickly. The wider the aperture is open, the slower the shutter speed has to be to accommodate the operation speed of the leaf shutter. It's a mechanical limit. In M and shutter priority modes, Fuji is allowing the faster ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


9

A (simplified) Look at Camera Sensors The sensor on your camera is 14 megapixels and 6.17x4.55 mm in size. By comparison, a Nikon D3100 (an entry-level DSLR) has a sensor that is also 14 megapixels, but its physical size is 23.1 x 15.4 mm. Even more expensive DSLRs, known as "Full frame," have a sensor that is roughly the size of 35mm film (about 36 x 24 ...


9

Having the lens sit much closer to the sensor removes the need to have a retrofocal (reverse telephoto) group which results in less extreme image correction, fewer lens elements and often a sharper image. However the increased angle of incidence of light rays at the edge of the image often results in increased light falloff (vignetting). For this reason a ...


9

These lines are very likely there because of the frequency at which your light flickers. This is most notably the case with fluorescent lighting or led lighting, especially when you dim the light. Led are dimmed by switching them on/off rapidly. The dimmer the light the longer the off periods which our cameras capture easily (and not only the X-T1) Another ...


9

From the information provided in your comments, it sounds very much like the shutter speed was too low, possibly because your ISO was too low and the subject was moving faster then the shutter, hence the blur. I'd suggest increasing ISO and shutter speed. Point of note. The light may seem OK to a human eye, but an eye is considerably more sensitive then a ...


9

In old instant films, the image you see appears directly where the film was exposed when you took the photo. The wide portion of the border contains developing and fixing chemicals. After the image is exposed, a roller breaks the chemicals free and spreads them across the film. Based on the consistent appearance of the splotches, the rollers are probably ...


9

I don't think you'll find what you're looking for, because: bigger things are bigger than small things. Full-frame cameras are bigger than APS-C cameras Medium format cameras are bigger than full-frame cameras. APS-C cameras are bigger than 1/2.3" format cameras. Just like full-sized pickup trucks are bigger than commuter cars. I think it likely that you've ...


8

Fuji X10 is supported by dcraw. Maybe UFRaw will support that one too, thought it does not contain the camera on supported cameras list. UFRaw uses dcraw as its backend.


8

The issue you're going to have is two-fold. The X10's EXR sensor is not something other cameras have, save for a couple of Fuji cameras. The EXR sensor can do a lot of things with the available pixels in the sensor and that is why their RAW files are a little odd compared to those of say the X-Pro1 or 100 which use the X-Trans sensors. You'll potentially ...


8

No, the last Fujifilm SLR was the Finepix IS Pro, released in 2007. Fujifilm's interchangable lens cameras these days are the mirrorless X system and the medium format GFX system.


8

You might also want to take into account the following: That 24-70 mm doesn't cover even half your current range. You really like the 90mm for portraits, and 90 mm is outside that recommended range? At best you'd have to adapt your shooting to that new lens An incredibly sharp lens is only useful if you use that sharpness for e.g. larger prints. If ...


7

On this model Fuji's extended DR function doesn't really alter the dynamic range of the sensor (if there were a way to increase DR it would be on all the time). Instead it gives you more room to recover highlights (which to most people makes it seem like dynamic range has increased) which is done by underexposing the shot. The reason for the increased ...


7

What am I missing? You're missing that Depth of Field is subjective. In actuality, there's only one plane that's in focus — everything else can't be. Then, there's an area around that plane that is indistinguishable from out of focus because it's beyond the technical limitations of your camera to distinguish from perfectly in-focus. But, that's often quite ...


7

First, a word about what depth-of-field is and is not: In a way, depth-of-field is an illusion. There is only one plane of focus. Everything in front of or behind the point of focus is out of focus to one degree or another. What we call DoF is the area where things look, to our eyes, like they are in focus. This is based on the ability of the human ...


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