50

Yes, there's something you can do. Stop using the card and replace it. Even reputable, high-quality cards have failures. And every such device has a limited lifespan. Don't risk it. You may do something which will cover up the problem, only for it to reoccur and cause you to lose images. SanDisk offers a long warranty in most countries — depending on the ...


46

This is a featured called Long Exposure Noise Reduction. To cancel out noise the camera will close the shutter and take an equally long exposure again, this time capturing a black image with only the electrical noise on it. This information is then used to reduce the noise on the original exposure. In the camera settings you can disable the Noise Reduction ...


38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


28

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system does ...


26

Professional cameras such as the Canon 1D Mark IV have dual memory card slots for a variety of professional use cases. I will break them down into three main groupings: Mirroring of the image across multiple cards for redundancy Automatic switching to a second card after the first one reaches capacity Ability to write different file formats to different ...


20

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


20

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


19

Look up Long Exposure Noise Reduction in your camera's manual. Depending on the model, you may or may not be able to continue taking photos. Some models do the processing immediately after the exposure. Some allow you to continue to take exposures, and then do the processing. This feature uses dark frame subtraction. The idea being that if you expose a ...


18

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


17

That is normal. The camera doesn't know how many images there is left, as images take up different amount of space depending on how much detail they contain. So the camera displays a guesstimate based on the free space on the card and an average size for images taken with your current settings. If you take images with large areas of sky or other smooth ...


16

I don't know what is required to recognize the "foreign" image, probably something in the Exif... but for your goal, just create the image with your message, with appropriate background, and take a picture of it when showing on the home computer screen. Then it is already in the camera.


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


15

The short answer is that it doesn't really matter. The "protected area" is not important for photography; I'm not aware of any camera that uses it. This area is theoretically used for user-hostile copy protection and is not really for your benefit in any case. When using your camera to store photos, you can just ignore it. The concern about less than ...


15

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


12

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


12

Is there something I can do to solve this situation ? Get another card.


11

This is really a case of read your camera manual. If your camera did not come with a full one, there will be one on a CD. The behavior greatly varies. Usually cameras use filenames which gives them 4-digit numbering (some use 5 numbers), so you could in theory have 9999 photos in a single folder. However, cameras can break down these images in folders ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


10

The main reason for this option is commercial - it allows the camera to be tried out in a shop and see the result of their test. Without this, you wouldn't be able to properly try out cameras. Normally, cameras allow just a small number of test shots to be stored.


10

My simplified diagram of camera I/O: |―――――――\ ] \ /----> | CARD 1 | |――――――――――| |―――――――――――――――| |――――――――――――――| | | | | | | ...


9

I have had a similar experience on my Canon Rebel T2i, the recording just stopped after roughly 5 seconds or so. The reason is SD card. Though some cards say they are "class X", sometimes they don't perform at that, I would suggest following steps 1) First of all format your card once and try again. My guess is this will not help 2) Try video at a very low ...


9

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less of ...


9

There is nothing technical stopping DSLRs from having internal storage (in fact, they already have a small amount). One reason for not including internal storage would be that it cannot be replaced, both in the short term (once the memory is full) and in the long term (once the memory, which would most probably be flash memory, starts to fail). Having the ...


9

The 'go-to' software for photo recovery is PhotoRec, freeware, available for many platforms. However - I would consider how valuable your data is to you... I would invest in a brand-new card. Long-term, they're cheaper than lost data or memories. There is a potential issue with flash media, that if an error is perceived at write, then the firmware will ...


9

Good (not super) quality 64GB cards are around 10 to 14 "generic bucks" (US Dollars, Euros, UKP). "Good quality" defined as "built as designed by a reputable brand, no reason to expect b grade product or counterfeits". This actually puts the usefulness of reusing them at all in question - instead of using them once, periodically downloading and until they ...


8

That count is a conservative estimate of how many pictures you can fit in the remaining space on your card, based on the maximum file size you could see with a JPEG Large. Depending on the image data, your JPEG might end up compressing better, which would mean the count would go down by less than 1 picture.


8

Unlikely but possible. Nothing you should need to think about. Every write operation on the card is risky and could trigger corruption if something nasty happens exactly in the moment of the write operation. Deleting a photo is a write operation. The more of those happen, the higher is the risk. Obviously moving the deletion operations AFTER a backup ...


8

I did experiment with my EOS 70D and 32GB SD Card. The normal format just rewrites the system part of the FAT32 partition, leaving data intact. The low level format really sets the whole partition data to zero, interestingly enough in approximately the same time.


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