50

Yes, there's something you can do. Stop using the card and replace it. Even reputable, high-quality cards have failures. And every such device has a limited lifespan. Don't risk it. You may do something which will cover up the problem, only for it to reoccur and cause you to lose images. SanDisk offers a long warranty in most countries — depending on the ...


38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


28

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system does ...


20

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


18

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


16

I have no idea why someone would recommend this. I suspect it is just superstition. There generally isn't anything important or useful to you outside of the DCIM folder, and you certainly don't get any benefit in copying that folder vs. copying its contents — your computer does the exact same thing either way. Canon's MISC folder is explained at What is ...


16

I don't know what is required to recognize the "foreign" image, probably something in the Exif... but for your goal, just create the image with your message, with appropriate background, and take a picture of it when showing on the home computer screen. Then it is already in the camera.


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


12

Is there something I can do to solve this situation ? Get another card.


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


10

My simplified diagram of camera I/O: |―――――――\ ] \ /----> | CARD 1 | |――――――――――| |―――――――――――――――| |――――――――――――――| | | | | | | ...


9

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less of ...


9

There is nothing technical stopping DSLRs from having internal storage (in fact, they already have a small amount). One reason for not including internal storage would be that it cannot be replaced, both in the short term (once the memory is full) and in the long term (once the memory, which would most probably be flash memory, starts to fail). Having the ...


9

The 'go-to' software for photo recovery is PhotoRec, freeware, available for many platforms. However - I would consider how valuable your data is to you... I would invest in a brand-new card. Long-term, they're cheaper than lost data or memories. There is a potential issue with flash media, that if an error is perceived at write, then the firmware will ...


9

Good (not super) quality 64GB cards are around 10 to 14 "generic bucks" (US Dollars, Euros, UKP). "Good quality" defined as "built as designed by a reputable brand, no reason to expect b grade product or counterfeits". This actually puts the usefulness of reusing them at all in question - instead of using them once, periodically downloading and until they ...


8

Unlikely but possible. Nothing you should need to think about. Every write operation on the card is risky and could trigger corruption if something nasty happens exactly in the moment of the write operation. Deleting a photo is a write operation. The more of those happen, the higher is the risk. Obviously moving the deletion operations AFTER a backup ...


8

I did experiment with my EOS 70D and 32GB SD Card. The normal format just rewrites the system part of the FAT32 partition, leaving data intact. The low level format really sets the whole partition data to zero, interestingly enough in approximately the same time.


8

It is okay to do this. The advice you were given is superstition that doesn't have any technical basis. (Cynically, the memory card manufacturer's representative may just have wanted to sell you more cards, and to propagate a story which could lead to more sales if widely believed.) This is slightly related to What is the right way to format a SD Card for ...


8

I've read that the performance is indeed comparable (at least from reputable vendors), so that makes the only real factors the form factor and the price. I find using an adapter a mild inconvenience, since it's one more thing to worry about, but I don't think that's a big deal. I also don't think "future proofing" is a big deal either, since cards don't ...


8

In my opinion its just a USB flash drive.


7

This is a known issue concerning the D90, and at least the D70 as well, that has been discussed at length on several forums. The problem usually seems to be with the on/off switch. Many users have reported that moving the power switch all the way over to the lightbulb position for lighting the top-of-camera LED display and pulling their finger back and ...


7

Even if you knew the exact amount of free space remaining on your memory card you could still only guess the approximate number of remaining frames you could add to the card. It is, in fact, exactly what your camera is already doing for you. This is because even RAW files are compressed, albeit losslessly, and so the exact size of a file depends upon the ...


7

A micro SD to SD card adapter is a passive device, i.e. it does nothing but provide a set of contact points bridging those on the micro SD card and those on the SD slot. That being the case, it should pretty much either work or not work, but won't impact performance... unless you find one of such low quality that the contacts fail to accomplish their simple ...


7

It depends. If the card is slower than the camera's maximum write speed then a faster card will improve the speed at which images are transferred to the memory card. If the camera's maximum write speed is slower than the card's maximum write speed then a faster card will show little to no improvement. For more in general on how to determine how fast your ...


7

Micro SD to SD adaptors are just passive wiring adaptors. So they should not have any impact on speed.


7

Not a definitive answer, but I'm a fan of using the USB connection first. My thinking is that if the USB port suffers mechanical failure, you'll still be able to charge and export files externally, but if the battery or card compartment breaks, you're without a functioning camera. To put it another way : Durability [external] = Durability [card slot + ...


6

Deciding what card to buy for a specific camera in order to get the fastest performance of which the camera is capable without spending more than necessary on a card that is even faster than the camera is capable of taking advantage is a daunting task. Not only can it be very confusing when comparing speeds of various cards, but learning how fast a write ...


6

Canon 6D's RAW files are somewhere in 23 to 28 MB range (24-26 on average), depending on what settings (particularly ISO) you have and what theme you photograph. Note: The size variance is due of Canon's CR2 has loseless compression inside as well as some JPG thumbnails/previews of the actual RAW data and also because, as I said, some settings (for example ...


6

The card won't read in the camera or in a computer, but both devices will read other cards? Sounds like a dead card to me. Time to get a new card.


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