Hot answers tagged

81

In order to get an image, both the subject and the "camera" must be much larger than the wavelength of the light that you use for imaging. The wavelength of visible light is between approximately 400 and 800 nm, i.e. smaller than a µm. Radio frequencies go up to several GHz, which corresponds to wavelengths of many centimeters. For example, the 2.4 GHz ...


20

I disagree with the answer with many upvotes. Physical lengths can be "swindled" in a number of ways and theoretically it would be possible to build a portable camera that snaps images of a very tiny portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Plus, you are not considering that there are not only high-band signals, but also ultra-high-band signals that could be ...


13

Your camera is supported by Canon Camera Connect (available for Android on the PlayStore), that can make your phone act as a remote Liveview monitor (among plenty of other things). CCC is free, so you can easily test that it fulfills your needs. Remember to bring spare batteries (for the camera, and perhaps for the phone), because this kind of use, ...


12

Yes; I have an EyeFi card and my battery doesn't even stand 50% of its performance. Fortunately I can turn EyeFi-wireless-mode off in my Nikon's D3200 menu. It's described in the user manual here:


7

Sort of. Not a "camera", but a computational imaging technique. We explore the feasibility of achieving computational imaging using Wi-Fi signals. To achieve this, we leverage multi-path propagation that results in wireless signals bouncing off of objects before arriving at the receiver. These reflections effectively light up the objects, which we ...


6

The cards are considerably more complicated electronically. Additional power would be needed to drive the ARM processor vs. a typical SD controller. Once you add in Wi-Fi radio and the encryption requirements that come with it you should expect an impact on battery life (though most cards now shut down Wi-Fi when it is not transmitting which helps.) The ...


6

The Canon EOS series disables Wifi if you enable HDR, or certain other functions (there seems to be no logic behind it). Check your manual for your specific model; Don't rely on common sense, as the limitations are arbitrary and illogical.


5

The process of connecting your (in this case Android) phone to your 70D involves multiple steps. First you have to enable wifi (you do this in the menu) on the 70D (the same applies to the 6D) and this brings up the wifi function menu option. When you select the wifi function you will be prompted to register a nickname for the camera. After doing that you'll ...


5

I was searching for something similar and found this GitHub repository, which was someone's attempt to reverse engineer the wi-fi protocol with the Fujifilm X-T10.


5

The camera uses WPS for WiFi security. On your android device, go to Settings -> WiFi -> Advanced Menu -> WPS Push Button. Then press WPS button on the camera. Here's a page from user manual explaining how to press WPS button in camera settings. In a few seconds, phone should connect to WiFi.


5

Many digital cameras now have built-in WiFi but it is usually tied to the application provided which may be upgraded from time to time. What I suggest doing, if you are looking for such a camera is look at these applications and then read the list of compatible cameras. Most such apps are on the Android store which makes them easy to find. For cameras that ...


5

If your problem is that your computer has only USB-C ports, just get a USB-C to USB adapter or hub. Transferring 5000 photos via WiFi from any camera capable of recording 4K video will not be practical, regardless of how generous your definition of "practical" may be. It takes a few seconds to move an SD card from a camera to a computer. The task may be ...


4

I'll tell you right away that there is no chance for me to answer without being very technical. Since you're looking for an open source solution it cuts away all of the commonly used programs and leaves us with a bunch of programs that require more from the user. The advanced part has nothing to do with photography though. The technicalities lies in ...


4

I have been scouring the 'net for info on connecting to my brand new fuji x-t10 from Linux, but have come up completely empty-handed. I tried sniffing the connection (I installed a packet sniffer on my phone), and what I've come up with so far is that a tcp connection is made from the phone to 192.168.0.1 (which is the camera) on port 55740. It appears to ...


4

Eye-Fi is made specifically for what you want. (not an employee, just a multi-year satisfied customer) Many cameras are compatible. Even some not specifically in the Eye-Fi database. I have a Fuji HS-10. It was not in their database of compatible cameras when I bought the card, but the HS-20 was. I gave it a shot, and it works perfectly. But yes, check the ...


4

From the manual (http://nikonsupport.eu/europe/Manuals/wu-1b/wu-1a_wu-1b_e5_01.pdf) you can reset the settings: To restore default settings, keep the WPS button pressed for over 10 seconds and then press the button again when the LED flashes orange. The LED will stop flashing, showing that the adapter has been reset. You will find the guide to connect to ...


4

Spent some time with Nikon tech support today. They said that I need a software update that is not out yet. I said that they had just released the IOS update so I pulled out my IPad mini, and I was able to connect for a few minutes to both the Bluetooth and the WIFI. So there is no fix currently. But the guy at Nikon said the release date is "soon".


4

It depends on a lot of factors you haven't revealed in your question. Among them: How does one define "practical?" For some that would be "nothing less than the fastest possible speed available by all current options." For others it may mean "anything that can do it unattended while I'm asleep for the night." What size are your 5,000 photos? Are they low ...


4

but what if I what to connect my camera to a WiFi (with internet) and not the other way around? Unfortunately, almost no cameras with Wifi work this way. Their target is not a managed, expert-level workflow. They are made for people to quickly transfer files to their phones in the field. As such, they generally all work as access points using a proprietary ...


3

Another 'sort of' answer: One possibility, more analogous to a traditional camera, is to use a stationary receiver and a strongly directional antenna. If the antenna is directed in the same way that an electron beam moves across a CRT screen, a render of signal strength can be created that can then be overlaid with a photo taken from the same point. While ...


3

If you couldn't find any information about their protocol (you've probably also tried Google search for communication protocol keywords directly on their site by typing keyword site:fujifilm.com) it isn't probably readily available. You can contact Fujifilm, explain them your intentions and they might help you. There might also be another option - you ...


3

I had the same problem--my Nikon d5300 came with WPA2 security already enabled for the WiFi connection, and I had no idea what the password was. I was connecting with an iPad, so I didn't have the option to use WPS. Here is how I fixed it: 1) On the Nikon, go to Menu > Setup Menu > Wi-Fi > Network connection and enable the WiFi connection. 2) Wait a few ...


3

Official wifi adapter Pros: Allows more than just photo transfer. Nikon's official apps (iOS, Android) will allow remote triggering. Unofficial apps (e.g. qDslrDashboard) will probably give you more control: at the very least, remote control of basic parameters (aperture, exposure time, ISO), and in principle they can combine this with triggering to add ...


3

It seems like your real concern is transfer of files to a computer without a USB A port. You ask about USB C cables for cameras, but, generally, people I know tend to pop the card out and put it in a card reader anyway. See Is it better to transfer photos by removing the memory card or by directly using a data cable? for more on this. And given that, there ...


2

Canon has a good Knowledge Base article about connecting a camera to your WiFi network. You should be able to repeat the steps for each camera, making sure each camera has a unique name, Step 2.5. Be sure to select "Auto Setting" for "IP address set" unless you have a unique network topography. You'll also probably want to change the download location ...


2

I had to reset my phone’s settings, so I lost my connection to my camera. I was perplexed trying to find the password. Finally I found how to reset the Wi-Fi and then be given a new password. Select Wi-Fi function > And then on the ‘Connection’ screen, select Exit. Don’t just exit the screen by hitting menu or back. Actually select Exit on the touchscreen ...


2

You may be interested in this project, http://dslrdashboard.info/. It takes a TPLINK MR3040 (~$30.00, and looks awfully similar to the camranger!) and provides a dd-wrt firmware image that puts some kind of API onto the device that DSLR Dashboard uses. DSLR Dashboard appears to be available as a PC app, as well as IOS and Android. I recently bought a ...


2

Note there are also many newer cameras from all major vendors that have WiFi built in (too many to list) or have a specific dongle for WiFi (e.g., the Nikon WU-1a (see this Nikon page). Last I checked the latter did not do automatic uploads, however.


2

Maybe somethink like '$ gphoto2 --port=ptpip:192.168.0.1 ...'? http://gphoto.org (libgphoto2 has a ptpip.c file) http://photolifetoys.blogspot.be/2012/08/control-your-camera-with-gphoto2-via.html


2

Try turning on airplane mode. That is what many users recommend via reviews in the App Store.


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