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49

I think your artistic decisions in this image are fine, and it is a worthy effort, but I also think that is exactly why Shutterstock rejected your image: they don't buy art. I would suggest that Shutterstock is interested in images that can be utilized commercially, where the subject is critical to conveying whatever the client wishes. Should the client wish ...


28

At least as of a few years ago, there was no "algorithm". The only automated reason for a rejection, when I was there, was submitting an identical image to one already on the system. Everything else was done by trained humans. I don't believe it's changed terribly much in the intervening years. This isn't a saleable image by Shutterstock standards, ...


26

As with many things, the end quality depends on the weakest link. Because most cameras are quite good, even cheap ones (even from mobile phones), the weakest link is mostly the person behind the camera. When learning some theory and practice, photographers can work around some pitfalls of cameras, but also knowing the shortcomings of a camera. When that ...


26

Doing an edge detection, this is where your image is sharp: If I draw a rectangle around it, it is 475x514 pixels, or 244kpx² out of 4600kpx². That's just 5%! Even for a picture with blurred background, my expectation would be more like 30%. An acceptable image (just considering sharpness) could be For the above picture, I still see a lot of room for ...


23

They do not really go haywire, mostly stop working. There is little chance your cameras would remain operational in that weather for more than a few minutes. There are really two things that happen in extreme cold. Starting at below 0C, most camera batteries start losing their ability to produce current. It is a slow process as the battery cools down. So ...


17

The idea that you can view raw image files in any way "without applying any editing" is a myth. Anytime you open a raw image file using an application to view it as an image on a monitor, there are development settings applied to the raw data. If you don't specify particular development settings, LR will use it own default settings. There's no such thing as ...


17

That depends on the type of camera. I used to have a Fuji auto-loading camera, that would spool the entire film out of the canister first and then every taken photo back into the relative safety of the canister. I'm sure there are other brands that do the same. While this is a nice feature, it does not work to your advantage in this particular case. I would ...


16

When a field of view is described as 120°, that refers to the total angle. So, 60° to the left of center and 60° to the right. Most camera lenses show a very restricted subset of the field of view perceived by the human eye and vision system. It is probably the case that the system is measured across the diagonal from corner-to-corner of a rectangle, ...


15

I'm guessing you're referring to the Lytro by Lytro, Inc. It's an example of a light-field or plenoptic camera.


15

Gear doesn't matter... until it does. While it is true that better gear won't make you a better photographer, it is equally true that any photographer is limited by the capabilities of the gear being used. It's not just "lesser" types of gear that technically constrain photographers. Even the very best available photographic gear imposes technical limits on ...


14

Higher megapixels do not add to lens sharpness. This has been found by many Canon EOS 90D owners. It has 32.5 megapixel APS-C sensor. Its pixel density is the same as 83.2 megapixel full frame camera. For example, Canon has announced a list of recommended lenses for EOS 5DS that is a 50.6 megapixel full frame camera. Interestingly enough, Canon has not ...


12

This is common beginner mistake. You are fortunate that you did it in the first few shots of the roll. Only the film that is outside of the canister will have been exposed to daylight ( ruined ) when you opened the camera. So any film inside the canister will be fine. You use the little black nub on the end of the canister to roll the film back into the ...


11

Not necessarily. Each lens can only produce a certain amount of detail, which means at some point it doesn't make sense anymore to increase pixel count because the given lens is not good enough for it. Higher megapixel sensors are also more vulnerable to camera shake and usually perform worse in low lighting conditions (as the individual pixels are smaller ...


9

There is higher res image From which you can gather that it is most likely Contax T2 Compact 35mm Camera. You can find it's image here and here.


9

Think about it like automobiles. A racing car or a semi-trailer truck would be awful to use on a grocery shopping trip no matter how 'pro' those automobiles are. But, someone who is in the business of moving goods across the country isn't going to pick the racing car or the family car either. Most of the professional photographers I've met or read about ...


9

It depends on the lens and the aperture at which it is used. Even a theoretically perfect (diffraction limited) lens can only generate an average of ~16MP at f/11 on a full frame sensor, and it goes down by ~50% for each 1.5x crop factor (7MP for APS, 4MP for 4/3, green wavelength). This chart shows the maximum resolution theoretically possible at each ...


9

The direct view intensity of an indoor electric lamp is generally lower than that of a specular reflection (say, from a car window or chrome hubcap) of the sun when outdoors -- but we don't see loud cautions from camera or sensor manufacturers warning against exposing images that might include reflections of the sun. In practice, there is only one kind of ...


8

A few additional observations–recently finished a video job at -32°C/-26°F in Fairbanks, Alaska. The fluid head tripod froze and was useless. The record button became very stiff, hard to use, and sometimes unresponsive. Watch your breath. It can get in the shot or fog your lens. And of course the camera lens fogged up briefly once it was directly brought ...


7

It is likely because chromatic aberrations are easy to fix on a fixed focal length, and fixed focus lens. And whatever remains is hidden by the heavy-handed post-processing that occurs.


7

Just wanted to know if its still possible that the battery works or if i should also buy another battery. Yes, and yes. Yes, it's possible that the battery still works -- I've been able to charge original batteries from my circa 2005 Rebel XT after they've sat for years, although the performance isn't nearly as good as new. But you won't really know unless ...


6

I've run into that when taking pictures of Raku ceramics in and just out of the kiln. I think it's a heavy dose of near IR overwhelming (or at least leaking through) the camera's IR blocking filter. With a phone this may be more of a problem than with a high end SLR- the IR block filter may not be as efficient. If it -is- IR then whatever lens coatings the ...


6

I don't think you can determine what specific camera left the observed notches, because it's not a feature or property of the camera's construction. Rather, it's a part of the construction of the film holder. The image you link to is a print of an uncut negative. The notches are simply the part of the film that is left visible by the rails of the film ...


6

Your phone doesn't know how to interpret NEF. However, it can recognise the tiny JPEG thumbnail (IIRC it's 160x120 px) which is embedded in the NEF, so you're seeing the thumbnail. That's why it looks so blocky. You'll need to process the NEF with suitable software (Lightroom, Darktable, etc.) to produce a full resolution JPEG.


6

All versions of the iPhone 8 have a 12 MP rearward facing camera with a 4:3 aspect ratio. That figures to about 3000 pixels x 4000 pixels in vertical (portrait) orientation. That's more than enough to furnish an image that is 2,400 pixels high and 1,600 pixels wide as recommended by Smashwords. It is just over twice as wide as the stated minimum width ...


6

A "Good quality camera" is Very important to good quality photography, however the real question you are looking for is something like "what aspects make for good quality in a camera for a given subject matter?" Cameras are tools, and you use a tool suited to the task at hand. A small tack hammer is not much use in driving railroad spikes or breaking up ...


6

It's a Polaroid type 600 box camera Specifically, it's the Polaroid Cool Cam. This model was not actually white, but grey with pink front plates and a pink strap. Although the pink front isn't visible in the video, you can see the pink strap hanging from the camera. These cameras shot Polaroid instant film, and many versions of this type were made (all of ...


6

A spot meter is handy to be able to read the reflectivity of an object in the scene precisely from a distance. It is like putting a telephoto lens on a meter to isolate one part of the subject. An alternate method is to walk over to the subject and read the reflectivity close-up. Without a spot meter, you would take a reading of the average light ...


6

The SR-1 was launched in 1959. It’s possible that your copy could be 61 years old! Even if it was stored in an airtight box, oils and greases will break down over that time and become tacky. Add actual use, dirt and dust, and that tacky can become gritty. The result is that functions begin sticking and then eventually freeze. Most people will buy one of ...


6

It's already broken, there's very little you can do to make it better or worse. Time for a new lens. The cost of repair would be significantly higher than a replacement lens. You can get those for $£€ 40 on eBay [even less if you're willing to wait out an auction], because so many people get them as part of the kit, then immediately want something better.


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