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11

Normally I'd suggest upgrading lenses and not bodies but in this case going to the 6D is going to solve your two problems: The 6D has significantly better low light performance than the T2i/550D Your 50mm will have the same field of view on the 6D as a 30mm on the T2i I recommend you get the 6D and then maybe, if you miss the field of view of a 50mm on a ...


10

In general, RAW file converters, including Photoshop, will only open RAW files from camera models they know about. There's nothing special about the 60D to 70D transition here; you don't say which version of Photoshop (to be specific, raw files support depends on Adobe Camera RAW plugin which is updateable either with Adobe's update tool or through installer)...


10

According to the online manual, the B on the mode dial will set it to Bulb mode. Have a look at page 24 in this document.


8

Lightroom 4.4 will not support Canon EOS 70D raw files, no. You would need the latest Lightroom 5.2 for that - as you say. However you do have the option to use the latest version (8.2) of Adobe's free DNG converter, which does support the 70D files, and will convert them to DNG "Digital Negative" files - which retain all the information of the raw files, ...


7

If you're asking how to take the images for a timelapse, what you're looking for is an intervalometer. And yes, there are several ways of achieving this, aside from a smartphone/tablet and the Canon EOS app. There are several smartphone apps that can do this. There are hardware intervalometers built into cable shutter releases. There are dedicated (mostly ...


7

This is just me, but use what you've got until you know what you need. Your inexperience and lack of knowledge are likely to be far bigger stumbling blocks to getting the image quality you want than the gear. Things like megapixels and frame rates, etc. all make less difference than messageboard discussions make it out to be. Lower-end gear tends to look ...


6

This is the electronic level indicator. It indicates that you're not holding the camera parallel to the ground but instead have tilted it. The specific configuration indicates that you've got a tilt of greater than 2°. From page 66 of the manual: Note that this is configurable — you can turn it off if you don't like it. It's also available on the rear LCD ...


5

Yes. Every camera with a proprietary raw format – any raw file that doesn't have a .dng extension – will need to be supported separately by each raw converter, even when it has the same file extension as other cameras that are already supported.


5

The process of connecting your (in this case Android) phone to your 70D involves multiple steps. First you have to enable wifi (you do this in the menu) on the 70D (the same applies to the 6D) and this brings up the wifi function menu option. When you select the wifi function you will be prompted to register a nickname for the camera. After doing that you'll ...


5

Yes and no. So far (Sept 2014), no Canon bodies can trigger the Wireless 600EX-RT flash via RADIO. However, a 70D can trigger it via OPTICAL (ie flash pulses) method, same as a 580EX/430EX etc. So, you must attach a radio transmitter, either a ST-E3-RT or another 600EX-RT, to the 70D in order to trigger the 600EX-RT via RADIO signal. While this ...


5

Any teleconverter/extender made for the Canon EF mount will work with your camera. Your question should be, "Which teleconverter would work with my lens." The short answer: It depends on what you consider as "working." You'll probably think, "No." Here are the main reasons why: You lose maximum aperture and thus auto focus. A 1.4X converter costs you one ...


5

It's explained on page 217 of the manual - seems like Live View shooting will stop after 30 minutes no matter what (it is said that the display turns off without saying anything about the sensor, but most probably the sensor itself turns off too). I guess it's a safety measure to prevent damage from overheating to the sensor and to save battery.


5

If you think a monopod would be useful for what you shoot, then IS would be useful. That's pretty much the easiest way to consider it. IS tends to be more useful for longer focal lengths than for shorter ones, but everyone's handholding capabilities and the lighting conditions they want to shoot in are different. Also be aware that the two lenses are not ...


4

Sounds like you got a bad unit. I'd say return/exchange it. If it's not firing from the Pilot button when full charged with known good batteries, then it could be an issue with the capacitor or the flash tube, and that's pretty major. Yongnuo gear has a lot of happy customers, but if you go back through the history of their stuff, you'll find that copy ...


4

You have probably enabled mirror lockup. The purpose of mirror lockup is to allow the slight vibrations caused by the movement of the mirror to dissipate before the shutter is opened. This is mostly an issue at shutter times between about 1/100 second and 1 second. Shorter exposures are over before the vibrations reach the parts of the camera that could ...


4

No harm will come to either the camera or the phone by disconnecting in any way, so just do whatever's easiest. Any of these will work: The app has a button to disconnect. Turn off the WiFi connection on the camera. Kill the app on the phone. (Press the home button twice and then swipe up on the image of the EOS app's screen.) Switch the WiFi network on the ...


4

The first sample image in the question is focused well in front of the central pillar. The second is focused well behind the flowers. You have told us that you are using single point AF but you haven't told us which AF mode you are using: One Shot, AI Servo, or AI Focus? If you're trying to focus and recompose using AI Servo the camera will refocus when you ...


4

Yes, it is possible. The ideal case would be if it was visible from your home so that you can leave a tripod stationary and just attach the camera when you need to. If the construction site is somewhere else, however, you can't use the tripod to mark a location. Better try to think of a good location to shoot from with something that won't move for a while - ...


3

Normally you would choose the "Optical Remote" option on the camera's menu to do this, even though you're not actually going to be controlling the flashes optically directly from the camera. This is because the camera sees the YN-622C transmitter as a camera mounted external flash. According to the third party written "The Other YN622C Use Guide", the newer ...


3

The sensor for the IR shutter signal on the 70D is that dot on the front of the grip, below the shutter button (see page 20 of the user manual). You must point the remote at that dot, so these types of IR remotes rarely work well from behind the camera, but work much better from in front of the camera. In addition, it's much like a television remote, ...


3

Some upper tier Canon cameras allow you to set the length of time the viewfinder display remains active when no buttons are pressed. A quick look at the EOS 70D Instruction Manual indicates this is not an option with the 70D. You can adjust the time exposure information is actively displayed while in Live View. There are a few ways to keep the viewfinder ...


3

Not sure if its a setting I may have changed by accident or something to do with the light sensors? It's very likely that you changed a setting accidentally, or that the light changed and you didn't change any settings to compensate. A passing cloud can make a big difference in the amount of available light. Also, if you were shooting in the late afternoon, ...


3

For your intended purpose there isn't a lot of difference between using a 700D or a 70D (The 80D, on the other hand, provides significant improvement in low light performance and dynamic range which is vital to most landscape photography). The 70D has very slightly better sensor performance, but the difference is well less than 1/3 stop in terms of dynamic ...


3

This is a bit embarrassing as the fix was quite simple. The Novatron pack I have has a H type (household) plug for the sync cable. Looks like a standard househould electrical receptacle. The plug can go in both ways and apparently polarity is important with the 70D. After I plugged it in the pack the other way around the strobes started firing fine. It's ...


2

In general, moving from one crop sensor to another isn't going to get you much in the way of low-light performance. Certainly, the 7D has (de facto) exactly the same sensor as the Rebel T2i, and the early indications on the 70D's sensor are that it isn't a significant step up in low-light performance. Moving to a full-frame sensor would get you one to two ...


2

I think the depth-of-field preview should not be used during live recording (why would you do that anyway?). Although I can only guess, the most probable reason is that when you press the DOF preview button, the aperture changes very quickly. (This is what is approximated with a step-function in electrical engineering.) Now, the system must respond to that ...


2

You need the C6. Basically look for shutter releases that are compatible with the Canon XXXD models. The connector for the shutter release port on the 70D is the same as for the dRebels: a 2.5mm stereo miniplug, not the three-pin proprietary connector port used on the 50D and previous XXD models--that's probably where the confusion is coming in. With the ...


2

Canon has a good Knowledge Base article about connecting a camera to your WiFi network. You should be able to repeat the steps for each camera, making sure each camera has a unique name, Step 2.5. Be sure to select "Auto Setting" for "IP address set" unless you have a unique network topography. You'll also probably want to change the download location ...


2

Either the 6D or the lens would work pretty well. It depends on how you want to proceed with upgrading. One big factor with considering the 6D is to remember that it won't work with any EF-s lenses you have, so if you have aspirations to go full frame, beware of that issue. If you do much shooting other than the low light stuff, the other thing to realize ...


2

I don't think there's any way you're going to achieve this without additional gear of some kind--most probably a wireless shutter release (remote). You could use an infrared remote (e.g., RC-6), for which the T3i and 70D both have a built-in sensor (it's that circular dot at the top of the grip). Or, if you're a Strobist, simple flash radio triggers would ...


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