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13

Your camera is supported by Canon Camera Connect (available for Android on the PlayStore), that can make your phone act as a remote Liveview monitor (among plenty of other things). CCC is free, so you can easily test that it fulfills your needs. Remember to bring spare batteries (for the camera, and perhaps for the phone), because this kind of use, ...


11

Since the other answers suggesting using an interface such as triggertrap don't address the specific question to your satisfaction: No, this is very, very unlikely to work. Despite the plugs being similar, they serve very different purposes. The camera release is basically an open circuit with a voltage potential (measured at 3v on mine) waiting to be closed ...


10

Unfortunately, selfie sticks are manufactured with very different designs one from another and with very wide range of standards (i.e. you can get worthless garbage or overbuilt luxury), so it is highly difficult to know all possible connection/activation mechanisms. Use with smartphones A huge number of s. sticks are made for smartphones, meaning that ...


10

Have a look at the cheap eBay intervalometers - they let you do very long exposures (using bulb mode on the camera) and also work as a normal remote release. I have one for my Nikon DSLR - It was around £12 or so, and (other than having a camera cable with an inline mini jack connector so you could use the same device with different camera connectors) it's ...


7

The reason not all wired remote shutter releases are universal, regardless of whether they do or do not have built-in timers, is that not all cameras have the same size/shape connecting plug to attach them to the camera. The controller you linked to above gets around this by supplying a plethora of adapters to fit just about any camera currently on the ...


7

You can get a wired remote on eBay for $£€ 10 to which you can add extension cables for about the same price. You don't even need to put batteries in for a simple shutter release, only for the timer functions. As all it's doing is closing a contact, you can run quite a long way. They have a 2-stage press, same as the camera's own release & a lock to ...


6

Yes, you can but you need an opto-isolator I've built a few cable releases for Canons, from a simple pushbutton to a USB (via a USB-RS232 dongle) trigger, to one triggered off a burglar alarm PIR sensor (for use as a camera trap). It won't be simple to trigger it off a sound card. If you can get enough voltage you might be able to modify my USB trigger ...


6

Use these settings to control how and when the transmitters send settings changes out to the lights. More specifically, when you have multiple shooters sharing the same lights, or if you want to remotely adjust your strobe settings and use a remote shutter. The settings are: Single shooter mode: To save on battery power, settings for the lights are only ...


5

I am unaware of any "left-handed" digital cameras. However, some old film cameras, such as Exakta cameras, were produced with the shutter release on the left side. Also, Nikon considered, and produced prototypes of, left-handed F100s (per Ken Rockwell). Manufacturers have little incentive to produce "left-handed" cameras because the vast majority of people ...


4

Instructions for using the RC-6 with your camera can be found on page 204 of your instruction manual. In order for the remote to work, you must place your camera in the timer/remote shooting mode. It won't accept IR shutter release unless it is in this mode.


4

You could probably use a radio shutter remote that has a connector which matches the one for a (wired) cable release for the RX-100III. I believe it's the same one that the Sony A7 uses. Unlike an IR remote, you'll have two units: a receiver that you hook into the camera's shutter release port with a small cable, and then a small transmitter you'll have in ...


4

I have several cheap $5 remote shutter releases for canon cameras. Never had a problem with them. Releasing a shutter remotely is such a simple operation, I can't image a 3rd party tool will cause any problems.


4

The plugs are all different, but the actual function of wired remotes are remarkably alike (with the lone exception of Panasonic - we'll get to that in a minute). Regardless of the interface used to connect the camera and wired remote, they are all pretty much simple three wire switches with a ground, a wire for 'half-press/focus', and a wire for 'fire'. The ...


4

Just because there is no IR port does not mean the camera can not be remotely controlled other than by Bluetooth. The camera also has the more traditional port for a wired remote. In the case of the 200D the wired shutter release port is a 2.5mm mini stereo jack which allows a simple three way switch (off/half press/full press) to operate the camera's ...


4

How can I operate a modern camera when I must do so left-handed? Add a battery grip and hold the camera upside down. This puts the shutter release and thumbwheel on the battery grip under your index finger, and also gives your thumb access to most of the other controls. This works very well in portrait orientation with your left hand under the camera, ...


4

As it name said this is something which help you remotely to "press" the shutter release. It can be mechanical (usually for old film cameras) or electric/electronic (for contemporary cameras). What this can help you? When you press shutter release you add vibrations to the camera which can introduce motion blur to your image (which in most of the cases is ...


3

I had the same problem with my Rebel T3i, and through Canon support I found the actual solution. On the T31, there is a movie mode menu you have to get to. To do so, you have to first put the camera in movie mode, THEN press the menu key. When you do that, a movie menu pops up, and one of the items is "Remote." It will be either enabled or disabled. So ...


3

There is no essential difference between the two types of connections other than the shape and arrangement of the connectors. The N3 socket on the camera body is probably easier to make weather sealed than the E3 socket that is basically a 2.5mm stereo mini jack. Both have three wires: a ground, a half press, and a full press. That is, in fact, the case ...


3

There were several early EOS cameras that used the T3 connector for both wired remotes and to connect a vertical shutter release. Many of those early models are listed at this link that was current as of 1993. "compatible with T50, T70, T80 & T90 cameras as well as the EOS-1, EOS 5/A2E/A2, and the EOS 620/30/50/RT series when those cameras are fitted ...


3

Probably because most users of the 1-series cameras from Canon don't expect to use their 1-series camera in situations that lend themselves to infrared remotes. Most pros who desire to release the shutter of their camera via a wireless remote use radio triggers that are much more reliable and configurable in environments that are usually rich with sources ...


3

i used Digicam Control on my Nikon D3200 and it works ! by the way, it works for Nikon D3100 too. You can see supported camera for Digicam Control here


3

I have both A7 and R100 m3 cameras and the same wireless remote shutter release from YouPro works fine with both models.


3

It's not so much a sensor as a mechanical connection — no electronics are involved — but the shutter button has a screw socket for a shutter release. See a video demonstrating this with a K1000 on youtube. The thing you want is called a "cable release" — for example, this one explicitly for Pentax. That one's 20" and $20; you could also go longer and more ...


3

The sensor for the IR shutter signal on the 70D is that dot on the front of the grip, below the shutter button (see page 20 of the user manual). You must point the remote at that dot, so these types of IR remotes rarely work well from behind the camera, but work much better from in front of the camera. In addition, it's much like a television remote, ...


3

As far as I've seen on their website, Kessler Second Shooter does not provide any focus control mechanism, therefore you would have to improvise. First option, workaround with the device itself: Set the lens on manual focus, move the camera on the slides using the Second Shooter's motor controls in small steps (here you need to check what's the smallest ...


3

If pulling the cord of the RS60-E3 out of the camera jack solves the problem then the problem is not in the camera, it is with the RS60-E3. What happens if you immediately plug the cord back in? Does the shutter open back up for another exposure? It sounds like the shutter button is just getting stuck and takes a while to fully release. If you only recently ...


3

How do I turn on the infrared remote capability, but turn off the 10 second self timer on my Canon T3i? In timer/remote mode the camera will fire either 10 seconds after you press the shutter release on the camera, or as soon as it autofocuses when you press the button on the remote. That is, if you use the remote, the camera won't wait 10 seconds, so there ...


3

The trick would be to find a transmitter that could receive the 2.5mm plug from your wired intervalometer. I'm not sure any such commercial product exists. It would probably be cheaper and easier to just buy a commercially available wireless intervalometer that fits your two cameras. Either of the two below would do what you want. https://www.amazon.com/...


3

You may not need any extra hardware. Check out CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit). It appears to provide the facilities that you are looking for, supports the SX520HS, and the developers claim that it does this without modifying a camera's firmware.


3

CHDK might do the trick. CHDK site among many other cool things, it includes an intervalometer. LINK


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