35

The answer you found on Yahoo is mostly wrong. The basic statement (same as dpollitt's answer here) is correct — theoretically, image quality shouldn't degrade but a number of factors might make it worse. And the list of things that might go wrong is sound enough. But the mapping of symptoms to problems is very inaccurate. Point by point: One would be ...


24

The 1st difference, and arguably the most important one, is the image sensor's size. DSLR has an APS-C or Full-Frame (35mm) sizes CMOS sensors, where Powershots have much smaller, some CCD some CMOS sensors. this translates to superior image quality in terms of digital image noise - the larger the sensor, the less noise is apparent in the image. In this ...


23

The sensors and lenses of even the most humble DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) currently on the market are far better than those found in the best phone cameras. Sensors and glass can only take one so far, though. The current crop of top smartphones have leveraged the power of computational photography¹ in a way that most ILCs don't. ...


21

Pocket cameras have significantly smaller sensors than DSLRs, usually in the range of 5mm across as opposed to 22mm across. I'm not familiar with the Olympus mu range however I've seen 12 and 14 megapixel compacts. These have more megapixels than DSLRs produced a few years ago, however it is mostly done for marketing purposes. The lenses in pocket cameras ...


21

That's an old point and shoot camera that took 110-format film. For that reason, they're usually called 110 cameras. You can even see that term, "110 CAMERA," on the label on the camera in your photo.


21

What were long, flat point and shoot film cameras called? You don't want to know what I called the cheap 110 Instamatic I was forced to use when I was young and couldn't afford anything better! The reason they were called 110 cameras is because they used the 110 film format introduced by Eastman Kodak in 1972. They were immensely popular in the 1970s and ...


19

f/8.0 is often the "sweet spot" for lenses on 35mm SLRs however on a small sensor camera like a Canon PowerShot that aperture is probably causing diffraction - there's a good reason the aperture doesn't go any smaller than that! Light spreads out when passing through a small opening like the aperture on a camera and this results in loss of sharpness. The ...


16

Practically speaking, digital cameras do not lose quality over time. Some factors can come into play such as: Equipment can wear causing it to be out of spec Environmental factors such as dirt, sand, dust, moisture can degrade quality Heat or excessive use(causing heat) can cause all electronic devices to experience wear Other regular use issues from ...


14

Sharpness is a result of eliminating various problems: Motion blur Focus blur Lens issues Camera issues You can avoid motion blur by ensuring you use a tripod, set your camera to use mirror lock-up (if available) and using a remote trigger or timer. You also need to ensure your subject is still! Alternatively, use a flash to isolate any movement to a ...


14

I think step number one is to find something more interesting than crumbs on your keyboard to shoot. And I don't mean that in a flippant way. Get away from the computer and stop taking test shots — start taking real photographs which you find interesting. Take those photographs back and do exactly what you've been doing: play around and make them look as ...


14

I gather from the aspect ratios (top one is 3:2, bottom one is 4:3), that the top image is the dSLR one, and the bottom image is the one from your TZ40. And at web sizes, while there's some improvement in image quality with the dSLR, it's not a huge amount better, and some could be compensated for with post-processing, rather than using straight-from-the-...


13

Images with your camera will start showing signs of diffraction around f/4 to f/5.6 due to the size of the sensor. Shooting at a significantly smaller aperture (like f/11) will only increase the diffraction problems. You'll lose resolution. Here's a good tutorial on diffraction: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/diffraction-photography.htm


13

Low light and zooming affect quality in two different ways. First low light. Point and shoot cameras struggle in low light because they have small lenses and small sensors. To compensate for this they automatically increase the ISO, which in simple terms is the sensitivity of the sensor to light. The problem is, the higher the ISO, the more grainy (it's ...


12

Megapixels are to cameras what top speed is to cars: it's an easy headline figure to boast about when in reality most customers will never need it. Worse still, other features may have been sacrificed in order to meet a price point with that alluring headline figure intact. Put another way, it's a bit like asking why a little Hyundai has a top speed of ...


12

A lens is needed to focus light on imaging sensor. For example, here's an image taken without lens attached to camera: For comparison, same scene taken with a lens attached: Carl Zeiss is a German manufacturer well known for carefully designed good quality optics; see also what makes a Carl Zeiss lens so special in a smartphone (the reasons are similar ...


12

Sensor area doesn't determine resolution in the same way as the film era. Back then simply increasing the area of film would yield a similar increase in the size you could print, and therefore the detail you captured. In the digital world sensors can have different numbers of pixels per cm Both 12MP compact and DSLR will resolve similar levels of detail ...


12

If you are shooting by looking at the rear LCD or an Electronic Viewfinder (EVF) to frame your shot here is the most likely scenario without more information from you added to the question (Camera model, specific settings, etc.). The LCD screen (either on the back or inside the EVF) is using the sensor to produce a series of pictures much like a video ...


10

This is a frequent questions from my photography students who get even more confused when they learn about macro lenses and wonder if they have to take macro shots with a macro lens in macro mode or do not need a macro lens because their camera has a macro mode. The real answer actually depends on the camera but most only do two things in strict macro mode: ...


10

But of course there is difference. I'll show you a couple of sample photos. Though I don't have a compact camera, so the comparison is between a DSLR and a smartphone camera. You know, smartphone cameras are nowadays on par with compact cameras. ^^A low light landscape photo. Notice especially the moon; a DSLR captured the moon almost correctly, whereas the ...


9

Many Canon PowerShots can, using the alternative firmware CHDK (found here: http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK)


9

I can't see any obvious noise in the photo at this resolution. I can see some JPEG artifacts (sections where the subtle differences in shade look like blocks rather than a gradual transition). Some people get confused between "noise" and "artifacting", and refer to both as "noise". Actual noise exists in almost all digital photos to some extent. Cameras ...


9

Technically mirrorless means there is no reflex mirror for a through the lens optical viewfinder and instead an image is read from the sensor in realtime and displayed on some form of LCD. However since this applies to all P&S cameras the term is usually used to refer to mirrorless cameras that feature interchangeable lenses, such as micro 43rds, the ...


9

Small sensors can be better for macro images, the standard definition of macro means a 1:1 size ratio between subject and film, so you could project an image of a 35mm object onto a single piece of 35mm film. Because compacts (usually) have smaller sensors a true 1:1 macro lens on a compact would be capable of filling the frame with smaller objects. A DSLR ...


9

Even keeping the same sensor size and lens parameters you will always save space by fixing the lens. You remove the need for a lens mount interface, lens barrels can be smaller as they gain stiffness from being fixed, you can put some of the lens mechanisms (zoom and focus motors) into the camera body, use leaf shutters instead of focal plane (Sony RX1). So ...


9

Like the other answerers have noted, it's not at all obvious which picture is taken with a DSLR — both have some pretty obvious issues, like blown highlights and poor contrast. Rather than enumerating the problems, let me offer a few tips for you and your friend on shooting scenes like this: If in doubt, always underexpose. This goes especially for ...


9

Fundamentally, what you need is a faster shutter speed. On more advanced cameras, you'd be able to put your camera into "shutter priority" mode and directly set the shutter speed, but that won't be directly possible on your A1000. However, it may be possible to help the camera in the right direction - two things you could try would be: Put the camera into ...


9

There is higher res image From which you can gather that it is most likely Contax T2 Compact 35mm Camera. You can find it's image here and here.


8

Lens errors are fairly common. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. I have written a blog post about some things that you can do to try to correct it. They only seem to work for ...


8

This is a good exercise, and there are some interesting differences between these models which are illustrative of things worth comparing. Technology generations: The Fujifilm camera is from 2010 and the Canon model from two years earlier. Electronics continue their march of getting cheaper and faster, and in general newer models have an advantage — ...


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