23

That's an old point and shoot camera that took 110-format film. For that reason, they're usually called 110 cameras. You can even see that term, "110 CAMERA," on the label on the camera in your photo.


23

What were long, flat point and shoot film cameras called? You don't want to know what I called the cheap 110 Instamatic I was forced to use when I was young and couldn't afford anything better! The reason they were called 110 cameras is because they used the 110 film format introduced by Eastman Kodak in 1972. They were immensely popular in the 1970s and ...


22

The sensors and lenses of even the most humble DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (ILCs) currently on the market are far better than those found in the best phone cameras. Sensors and glass can only take one so far, though. The current crop of top smartphones have leveraged the power of computational photography¹ in a way that most ILCs don't. ...


14

I gather from the aspect ratios (top one is 3:2, bottom one is 4:3), that the top image is the dSLR one, and the bottom image is the one from your TZ40. And at web sizes, while there's some improvement in image quality with the dSLR, it's not a huge amount better, and some could be compensated for with post-processing, rather than using straight-from-the-...


12

If you are shooting by looking at the rear LCD or an Electronic Viewfinder (EVF) to frame your shot here is the most likely scenario without more information from you added to the question (Camera model, specific settings, etc.). The LCD screen (either on the back or inside the EVF) is using the sensor to produce a series of pictures much like a video ...


10

But of course there is difference. I'll show you a couple of sample photos. Though I don't have a compact camera, so the comparison is between a DSLR and a smartphone camera. You know, smartphone cameras are nowadays on par with compact cameras. ^^A low light landscape photo. Notice especially the moon; a DSLR captured the moon almost correctly, whereas the ...


9

Like the other answerers have noted, it's not at all obvious which picture is taken with a DSLR — both have some pretty obvious issues, like blown highlights and poor contrast. Rather than enumerating the problems, let me offer a few tips for you and your friend on shooting scenes like this: If in doubt, always underexpose. This goes especially for ...


9

Fundamentally, what you need is a faster shutter speed. On more advanced cameras, you'd be able to put your camera into "shutter priority" mode and directly set the shutter speed, but that won't be directly possible on your A1000. However, it may be possible to help the camera in the right direction - two things you could try would be: Put the camera into ...


9

There is higher res image From which you can gather that it is most likely Contax T2 Compact 35mm Camera. You can find it's image here and here.


8

It sounds like you are describing mirrorless system cameras. They have the interchangeable lenses and some of them have larger sensors, but they always use the sensor directly to an LCD or OLED display rather than using a viewfinder (or in rare case, use a viewfinder that doesn't go through the lens), which saves on size and weight (while giving up a few ...


8

Try outdoors in daylight. Small cameras struggle at low light, and normal indoor room lighting is lower than you realize. For better camera, the bigger the sensor the better. You might also get one that can control a big flash: aiming the flash to bounce off the ceiling can give nice results (like a ceiling lamp) and not bother the baby like direct flash. ...


8

With a more sophisticated camera, I'd say: get a faster lens, or a bounce flash. (See Prime lens or flash: which upgrade will most improve baby photos? for thoughts from me and others on this topic.) But your camera is a relatively simple point-and-shoot, where these system-addons aren't really an option. There are still a few things you can do, though. ...


7

Your mind is working fine, it's the inch-based measurement system that's dumb. The 36x24 mm sensor measurement is straightforward; those are the length and width of the sensor in millimeters. The 36x24 mm size happens to be the same size that the image was on 35mm film, so that size is often called "full frame". It's the inch-based system that's confusing ...


7

First you need to have an estimation of how long does it take for a flower to die. You can Observe a similar flower or just guess. It really depends on the type of flower and the environment (in/out soil, outdoor/indoor, humid/dry, etc). Once you have this time (let's call it Tf), then you have to decide how long your movie clip should last (Tm). Once you ...


7

There are both similarities and differences in terms of the optics between binoculars and using the longer focal lengths of a Superzoom camera to view distant objects. First, let's look at the similarities: Focal Length. Both the binoculars and the camera use optics to enlarge distant objects. If a binocular has a magnification factor of 10x, that would ...


7

Your assumption is wrong. The specifications are never the same. Sure, there is some overlap as in the number of megapixels or maximum shutter-speed may be the same but this is just one single measure. It's like saying that two cars are the same because the run at the same RPM. Like with everything else, you have to look at specifications that matter. When ...


7

So, besides using film with different ISO, how could you change exposure in these cameras? Were you limited to just one? If your camera didn't have any electronics or user controls, it's likely that it really was limited to a single aperture and shutter speed setting. That shouldn't be surprising -- the same is true of single-use disposable film cameras ...


7

To be honest, I couldn't easily guess which is which when viewed at the default 600-pixel-wide size above. Both handle the dynamic range of the clouds pretty poorly, with the lower image being a little less bad. Looking more closely, the top image has significantly more detail in the trees — but still isn't astounding. (Both are subject to very high JPEG ...


7

I'm going to focus on this: Alternative Question: Which is the most popular DSLR Lens focal length for family pictures and vacations? A typical compact camera with a 10× zoom lens might have a focal range specified as "24-240mm"; a higher-zoom "×" compact may be both wider and (lower focal length at the "zoomed out" side) and go significantly longer. For ...


7

Some of what is currently being sold might be old stock. Some models have special capabilities, eg superzoom or great lowlight performance. But even ignoring these cases, there are some niche uses, for example: People who just plain hate smartphones The kind of smartphone that has an actually decent camera is still comparatively expensive if bought at list ...


6

Unlike AJ, I think the low-light capability of the P510 is halfway decent for its class; of course I'm not comparing it to any DSLR as the P510 is the best I've got at the moment. If it's all you've got, it's better than nothing and loads better than a P&S, but if you're getting paid to produce, I'd seriously consider borrowing or renting a professional ...


6

I am not 100% sure what you mean. Looking at the viewfinder of my 500D, it looks like (Via Bob Atkins) If I take the liberty to add "thirds lines", it looks like this: Unless you mean "100% spot on!", this looks very much like spots in the intersections of thirds lines. (My handiwork is a bit shoddy on the second picture, I have to admit as well.)


6

As others have noted, there often are focus points near to the rule of thirds intersection points, but they aren't always precisely in that location. There might be some consumer demand for it, but there are two major reasons why not, both answered, I think, by my answers to What is the “Rule of Thirds”? and What is the 'Golden Ratio' and why is it better ...


6

Can you do shutter button half-press to focus? That is usually an easy workaround. Just focus on a simple object with the same exact distance, half-press the shutter button, then recompose (keep the button half-pressed, target the camera on the mirror), then press the button fully. Usually works with most cameras... Another way is to put a non-...


6

There have been a lot of technological advances in the past eight years, the most visible of which will be noise performance in low light, overall speed, and convenience features like live view with a large rear LCD. It sounds like you are not really taking advantage of your DSLR in more ways than just not using advanced features – you're only using the kit ...


6

Yes, it's possible — but it's more likely that that's just how it is. You can't expect miracles from a point and shoot camera, and fine detail with no noise when "pixel peeping" would be a miracle. You say that the results are satisfactory for viewing as a whole on a computer screen. They'll also be fine when printed at reasonable sizes. In any case, it's ...


6

Dirt can never cause grain. It's more likely you are seeing digital noise. Switching to lower ISO should help.


6

The best method to price a lens is by seeing what the market value of the same used lens are. There are many different ways to determine the value across different platform. For each of these compare like for like, so as well as condition if you have a box/filter/hood/case/cds/leads/remaining warranty etc compare sold values to lenses with box/filter/hood/...


6

Had the same problem once with 135 film and a Canon EOS 300v. Turns out, that: the battery was quite low (and old) it was winter-time outside with -5 °C and some idiot (me) had the habit of tightening the film before putting it into the camera. I did so for years with manually winded cameras. But the electronics measured maybe to much needed force and ...


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