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35

Before roll film there was sheet film. With sheet film a photographer could select particular films with particular emulsions individually for every shot they took. Applicable characteristics of a film's emulsion would include sensitivity/film speed, fineness of grain, color response/balancing, contrast, as well as the overall 'look' that different films ...


32

If your goal is to practice composition and work with shadows and lighting cheaply and efficiently, then you should shoot digital, not film. You will get more immediate results, and the ability to make changes at the time of shooting. As far as color vs. B/W is concerned, you can make changes in post with color filtering to understand how different color ...


30

Some models of 35mm film cameras, upon loading advance all the film from the cassette on to a take-up spool. For these models, the first picture is taken on the end of roll, likely about frame # 36 or # 24. As you take pictures, the film advance actually rewinds the film back into the cassette. This scheme was used on a few models, it protected exposed film ...


29

I recently had this strangle little idea to take some photos and just leave them undeveloped until I am nearing the end or my family is looking at them after my passing. How disappointed do you think you'd be if, after being given a prognosis of a few months, you attempt to develop your film, but they're all fogged? What if your family simply doesn't care ...


26

Well, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Whether that's because of user error (film not installed right so it didn't catch on the advancing mechanism) or a hardware issue with the advance mechanism not working properly can't really be determined without more information and/or inspection of the camera... Try taking a couple shots ...


22

I think you are putting too much emphasis on the "digital" part of the lens' DG designation. It seems to be more to differentiate them from "digital" lenses that are APS-C only. Sigma calls their current APS-C only lenses "DC". When digital SLRs first began to gain a foothold in the market, they almost all had sensors that were APS-C or similar sized. So new ...


21

My antique wooden Kodak™ day-light loader (ca. 1905) was made with a removable spool of thin (now quite brittle) perforated celluloid with raised rubber edges. The film was sandwiched between the layers of the roll. The celluloid strip was wide enough to accommodate all sizes from miniature to very wide 128 (2½" wide!). The roll of film was wound inside ...


20

Ilford Delta is a pretty common film. I am certain you will be able to find a reputable lab to develop it somewhere around (you do not mention where exactly in Germany are you spending your year). On the other hand, you should not have a problem developing it yourself in a years time. To maximize your chances you should keep it cold - in a fridge, or even ...


20

Doing double exposures with the k1000 requires that you cock the shutter using the lever while simultaneously holding down the release on the camera bottom. This allows the shutter to cock while not advancing the film. Check to make sure that this release button isn’t sticking in.


18

Yes, lenses designed for digital sensors have several differences from their older film based camera lens counterparts. One of the primary differences is that digital sensors are more reflective than film, so anti-reflective coatings are applied to the rear element of a digital lens. This helps prevent reflections off the sensor that could result in image ...


18

It looks like the laboratory messed things up: the film you used is a daylight color negative film. Which means that basically, without (extra*) correction, the daylight images should have been ok, and the indoors way too orange. But as it is a negative film, the lab can apply an extra correction for white balance (probably the reason there is no tungsten-...


17

That depends on the type of camera. I used to have a Fuji auto-loading camera, that would spool the entire film out of the canister first and then every taken photo back into the relative safety of the canister. I'm sure there are other brands that do the same. While this is a nice feature, it does not work to your advantage in this particular case. I would ...


16

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


15

The orange veil to the right of the last image is a common effect of light fogging. In fact, I've seen that many times on the first frame of 35mm when I started exposing without winding enough frames first. The white fog might be a different sort of light leak, perhaps due to the shutter not being completely closed when you advance film and cock the camera....


14

Just my notions, but some people did not take so many pictures. It might take weeks or months before they would expect to accumulate 36 exposures. Rolls of 24 were a little less expensive, and less to process, and served the immediate need better. About the same reason you might buy only a few tomatoes at the grocery store, instead of a bushel. Roll film ...


14

One of the users on Photo.net is a chemical engineer who worked at Kodak for ~30 years. He posted the following information in a thread over there about Life expectancy for refrigerated film: In all cases where we are using film past its expiration date, the only safe approach is to try a roll OF EACH PRODUCT and evaluate it before shooting the rest ...


14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


14

If you leave something unfinished it will probably stay unfinished. People have enough to do tying up the normal loose ends after someone croaks. Schubert’s unfinished symphony stayed unfinished for a long time and most people are no Schubert. The same effect can be achieved by developing the images and including their sharing in your will. Talk to your ...


12

For digital cameras, it's purely due to historical reasons - 35mm was the dominant size for film cameras and cinematography. As for why film cameras ended up with 35mm, I'd suggest 35 mm film and 135 film on Wikipedia as a good place to start. It's also worth noting that "35mm" is not actually the size of the image, which is 36x24 mm, but the width of the ...


12

You might look at the Wikipedia Photography Technology timeline. A few key points from that reference: 1909 – Kodak produces 35 mm motion picture film on an acetate (less flammable) base 1913 - Kodak introduces panchromatic film (approximating the color sensitivity of the eye - older emulsions were not very sensitive to red light). 1925 - These innovations ...


12

This is common beginner mistake. You are fortunate that you did it in the first few shots of the roll. Only the film that is outside of the canister will have been exposed to daylight ( ruined ) when you opened the camera. So any film inside the canister will be fine. You use the little black nub on the end of the canister to roll the film back into the ...


11

As @Sandor Dosa comented. It is a light leak. It is difficult to know where the leak happened. Prior for you to use the film (a faulty film from start) Your fault during mounting the film. Your camera has a leak. The film is jammed. You handling the film prior to send it to develop. The lab during the handling and process. The bad news is, as you stated ...


11

Usually, it does not affect or limit the aperture or shutter speed at all. Rather, it tells the exposure meter where the center is. In some ways, it's exactly like exposure compensation dials. If the camera has a program mode, it's essential information for getting exposure right. If it doesn't, like the Pentax K1000, it just shifts the exposure needle — if ...


10

Shorter version: Expose it as 3200 and shoot normally. Develop according to the instructions and make sure you use the correct development time for 3200. Longer version: Delta 3200 is not an ISO 3200 film, it is more like ISO 1000-1200. If you expose it as 3200 and develop according to the instructions, you are actually push developing it. The film ...


10

The longevity of developed photographic film is a variable. This depends on the quality of the processing. If the process is well done, the fixing step has gone to completion and there will be no unexposed, thus undeveloped silver salt crystals. If fixing is incomplete, these crystals will in time self-reduce and blacken. If present in quality, the ...


10

The image captured on photographic film is called a latent image. Translated, this means an image invisible unless somehow treated to cause a visible image to appear. The latent image is best when the treatment (developing process) occurs soon after exposure. As time passes the latent image weakens. This decline is due to chemical changes and outside factors....


10

You say in a comment to another answer that the camera used could not have been a pre-loaded disposable compact. But that is how the film was loaded in more than a few varieties of them. The film was transported through them 'upside down' from left to right and the lightproof cassette was used as the takeup spool. The cassette was also upside down compared ...


10

Last I checked Germany was rather up there in the photography world. But anyway, I would be more concerned about carrying undeveloped film back through air travel. X-rays and film do not mix. You can put them in a metal box, but you would need to pass that for inspection to the security folks to not go through the X-ray machines. While storing it, you ...


10

First, I advise against developing the rolls from your trip. Beginners face numerous pitfalls, and what can go wrong will go wrong. Having said that, it’s lots of fun to develop film, so go for it -- just select sacrificial rolls until you get past the learning curve. Now about developers: All developers are reducing agents, they reduce (split apart) the ...


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