7

Some of what is currently being sold might be old stock. Some models have special capabilities, eg superzoom or great lowlight performance. But even ignoring these cases, there are some niche uses, for example: People who just plain hate smartphones The kind of smartphone that has an actually decent camera is still comparatively expensive if bought at list ...


5

Digital cameras are not made to be end-user reparable. It is likely that there are tiny ribbon cables and other small connectors, pieces fit into place just so, and even things glued together in a way that makes working very inconvenient. If you are used to working with this kind of thing — and I have many D.I.Y. electronics-enthusiast friends who are — the ...


4

If what happened is as you reported, i.e. only 4 frames exposed, you likely will be OK shooting the remainder. This is because the film cassette is light proof thus is protects the yet to be exposed film. Re-load, fire off 6 frames and then shoot. One can never be quite positive about such things, something might not be as reported. If it were me, I would ...


3

I'm guessing the z-up 110 is using a leaf shutter; which is essentially using aperture control for both the exposure amount (size of opening) and exposure duration (time open). And I would guess it is reducing the opening size to prevent overexposure; because it doesn't have fine control over the flash output. A leaf shutter can be the aperture blades of ...


3

If you have to ask, the odds are high that you'll make it worse. If you consider the camera useless in its current state, the XP you gain by trying to fix it may be worthwhile. The camera will fill with whatever is in the air around it, which likely does include dust, but there's probably already dust in the sensor compartment because zoom lenses create ...


2

Dust is far less a destroyer of cameras than, say, amateurish attempts at sensor cleaning. ILC owners can attest that dust is simply something you learn to live with. That being said, your W610 is not an ILC. There is no normal method for cleaning the sensor (I realize that you can pull the camera apart. This isn’t SOP for the majority of W610 owners). ...


2

Whether you want to compensate the camera's auto exposure for the lighting conditions depends on a number of factors. Cameras use various metering methods to determine the correct exposure. This is a considerable list, so I won't list and explain all of them, but two common methods are centre weighted and average metering. Since light meters expect ...


2

Based on observing this video at youTube, it seems that your camera has a leaf shutter, sometimes called an iris shutter, based in the lens. Such shutters are much different from two-curtain focal plane shutters that sit directly in front of the film plane and must travel much further to open and close. This allows leaf shutters to be much "faster" than ...


1

You need to tell us the make and model of the camera. Some models, upon being loaded and the back shut, advance the film all the way. In other words, the normal action of the camera is to pull out all the film and wind it onto a take-up spool. Thereafter, the camera returns the film, one frame length at a time, as a picture is taken, to the safety of the ...


1

Giving a correction factor blindly makes no sense, we don't know your location and weather. However, try carrying a digital camera with you, if you are unsure. Even a smartphone would suffice. Take the first three or four photos with it and check for each one what the film camera suggests for exposure and aperture (don't shoot, just check suggested values)....


1

I've been using a Fujifilm Finepix S9200, a bridge camera with a 24-1200mm lens (50x zoom), but only a 1/2.3" sensor. It's too cumbersome for travel, so I'm looking for something lightweight, most likely a point and shoot. Some of what I enjoy photographing are faces: children, statuary, etc. I've never needed to go to the end of my lens, but I've easily ...


1

I'm wondering if I should bring extra batteries (CR123) with me. It's usually a good idea to bring extra batteries. However, if you forget or lose them, CR123 are common enough that you should be able to find replacements somewhere. (How was your trip? How many batteries did you end up using?)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible