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101

4K might be the next big thing in video, but for still photography that's just 8 megapixels, which is quite low for most cameras, and I think around the resolution of the iPhone. I have a Nikon D5300 with 24MP resolution, and I've seen other DSLRs get up to 36MP or higher. And no matter what, if you zoom in enough, you will eventually get pixelation (...


62

Is there any significant benefit to having an SLR mechanism in a digital camera? Particularly in terms of a benefit that's large enough to make up for the liability of adding a mechanical part into a design where a solid-state alternative is available? Yes. Response speed for both autofocus and shutter release. The mirrorbox has a number of side ...


55

It would be wrong to think that increasing ISO results in no "physical" change in the camera at all. The problem with ISO is that people often call it sensitivity. That is really a misnomer...sensitivity is a fixed attribute of any given sensor, and it cannot be changed. Sensitivity is really more synonymous with the quantum efficiency of the photodiodes, ...


54

The general reccomendation is a 3-2-1 Backup strategy, meaning you have 3 copies: 2 local, 1 offsite. Here's one way: Get a NAS appliance (like a Drobo) to protect against a single disk crash (or just an external disk, with no single disk failure protection) Add an Apple Time Machine to get your 2nd local copy. If Time Machine is not for you, get ...


53

And with a digital camera, you don't need a hinged mirror as you can show the user exactly what light will be captured by just routing the sensor output to an LCD display. This is the reason for the rise in popularity of mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (MILC). Without the mirror box, the camera can be smaller, lighter, less expensive, etc. Having ...


46

Most cameras already have a resolution going far beyond 4K. Assuming you mean Ultra HD (3840x2160) opposed to "true" DCI 4K (4096x2160) you get a resolution of about 8MP (DCI 4K would be about 8.8MP). Most cameras are already way over this size and are at 20MP or even higher. So a "4K" image would actually be smaller than a full size image. That aside, you ...


45

DCIM is short for Digital Camera IMages and is part of the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera industry to insure interoperability from one brand to the next. From wikipedia: Design rule ...


43

Quick summary Yes, bigger pixels do improve performance all else being equal, and Apple is doing a good thing by focusing on sensor size. However in this case the increase in size is so slight that the difference will be negligible, probably not living up to the level of improvement you may expect from their marketing. What does bigger pixels mean? This ...


41

From a purely theoretical point of view: more megapixels good. People often talk about how high megapixel sensors were now outresolving most lenses, thus there was no point going higher unless using the very best glass. This is not always true. System resolution is the product of lens resolution and sensor resolution. Thus if you improve one, your system ...


41

There is an ISO which is not necessarily 200 that is the native sensitivity of the silicon from which the sensor is made. That sensitivity depends on the sensor itself, so will vary between cameras, but it is almost always between ISO 100 and 200. The camera amplifies the signal to get higher sensitivities. It scales down the signal to get lower ones. ...


37

This is moiré. It occurs because a screen is actually a grid of squares that are being used to make the image. When it ends up trying to be mapped to another grid of pixels (either by being captured by a sensor or by scaling) points of light or pixel data don't line up exactly. Some pixels get 2 pixels of information, some get the border between pixels. ...


36

First, understand a couple of things: Even though we call these things "digital cameras," the process of turning photons into numbers is entirely analog. Analog circuits pick up all manner of noise from their surroundings. Noise isn't one constant value, it's a range of them that top out at a level called the noise floor. The processing you did on the ...


31

First an explanation; this answer extensively borrows from and combines points from a number of the existing answers to this question. To those from whom I have borrowed, thanks. A short answer to this question is "very little" but that hardly does justice to the intent of the question. So I'll make a long answer and divide it into sections. Spectral ...


28

I used to be a pro, so I can answer this: This is absolutely normal; it is even very good! I consider 30 good pics out of 400 a very good result! The most important point is IMHO that you go over your shots and select. The "reflection process" is important. It is the place where you learn to take good pictures. This is what most amateurs don't do. And this ...


26

Don't forget a major drawback that EVF's require power to compose, and are much harder on batteries if you spend a lot of time with the screen on. Also, as previously mentioned, because of delays, it is harder to follow moving objects with an EVF.


26

As with many things, the end quality depends on the weakest link. Because most cameras are quite good, even cheap ones (even from mobile phones), the weakest link is mostly the person behind the camera. When learning some theory and practice, photographers can work around some pitfalls of cameras, but also knowing the shortcomings of a camera. When that ...


24

you don't have to reproduce the algorithms that the camera is running to render your photo on the small display on the camera. This all depends on how much you value what is shown on the camera's LCD - it isn't any more "right" than any other algorithm. If you personally happen to like Sony's algorithm, then you may find it advantageous, although you can ...


23

Maybe it represents the small variation of the temperature of the sensor. A hot sensor produces more noise than a cool one. The small temperature difference can be explained by the presence of electronic components, or the way the sensor is in contact with other parts, allowing more or less heat dissipation. Some related links : http://en.wikipedia.org/...


23

One thing to consider is what style of photographer you fashion yourself as. Some schools take more pictures than others and see different success rates. Are you shooting sports? You have no control over the action so you're probably going to spray-and-pray until you get the perfect shot. You may only get 1 sellable photo out of 1000. Are you shooting on ...


23

The information your friend gave you was essentially correct for most digital cameras, particularly compact digital cameras with very small sensors, made about 15-20 years ago. Digital imaging sensors were more primitive and noise reduction techniques were less sophisticated. By placing the native sensitivity of a sensor at one stop higher than what ...


22

Perhaps I'm a bit old-school in this way, but I personally avoid storing my stuff on "somebody else's computer" (a.k.a. the "cloud"). I would just buy (at least) two external drives of sufficient capacity - storage is cheap these days. Back up all your images onto one, and then make a copy of that drive on the other, so you have two copies. Generate a ...


20

Yes, if you shoot RAW. If you have difficulty visualizing an image in B&W, shooting in B&W gives you a good approximation of the final image at the time of shooting so you can adjust; many digital cameras can even process B&W with color filters, so if you have a particular type of processing in mind, such as using a red filter to darken skies (...


20

That is a true statement, but it misses the big point. (As the shutter would see it), it would simply become continuous light, like any incandescent light bulb (always On for the full shutter duration would be indistinguishable from continuous light). Like continuous light, there would be no motion stopping ability at all. And even a 500 watt light bulb ...


20

Why? Fundamentally, it's because of the way flashes work. Flashtubes generate light by discharging a capacitor through a xenon-filled tube. The resulting electric arc produces bright white light. But a continuous electric arc would produce a lot of heat, which would weaken the tube, and it would consume a lot of power, which batteries cannot supply for long....


19

The technology is not primtive but actually quite advanced. Every component important to photography is constantly being researched and improved. The cost of those improvements are passed on to buyers, just as with everything else. Furthermore some of what you suggest would render a camera worse for photography: The interface of each manufacturer is highly ...


19

First, a little background to clear up a slight misunderstanding on your part. The vast majority of color digital cameras have a Bayer filter that masks each pixel with a color filter: Red, Green, or Blue.¹ The RAW data does not include any color information, but only a luminance value for each pixel. However, RGB filters necessarily cut out two thirds ...


18

A wonderful thing about photography is that it's multiple hobbies in one. You can enjoy the act of capturing moments distinct from the production of final images. You can develop your skill in print-making without taking pictures yourself. You can collect photographs taken by the masters. You can participate in contests. And, you can enjoy the gear ...


18

Yes, still cameras can do things 4k video can't. I imagine that future cameras will go in the direction of the Canon 1D C, which has still photography and 4k video in the same body. From a photography standpoint, the advantages of shooting stills instead of frame-captured video include: Higher resolution. 4k video is around 8 megapixels, compared to the 16-...


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