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I found this page while checking my stats on Flickr. (I'm the photographer that shot this photo) I thought I'd respond with details of how I created this image since I see multiple theories here. First - this is not a stacked exposure. The entire image is a single exposure (30 secs). I used a Nikon D700 DSLR at ISO 3200 to capture this image (at ~20mm/f2.8)....


34

Things to consider when thinking of purchasing your first dSLR. 1. Can I afford a dSLR? If you've never used an interchangeable lens camera system before, realize that the cost is astronomical in comparison with fixed-lens cameras, because the camera body itself is just the start of your purchases and the basis of your system. It is also (weirdly) the most ...


31

If you read the other answers, it should be apparent that the qualities you seek such as (a) better portraits and (b) the desire to have a blurred background ... aren't really one thing, but a combination of many factors. There are some nuances but the short answer is ... portraits do not require advanced DSLRs (so entry level is fine) but... there are ...


25

You're right. Picture quality is as complex as, say, how well a food item tastes. Megapixels only tell you the number of pixels the picture is made up of, and more is certainly not always better. More pixels on a small sensor means more noise. Megapixels are often used by marketing just because people want simple truths, like 18 MP must be better than 10. ...


23

Essentials I think that all three of the camera types (dSLR, mirrorless, and fixed-lens compact) can be used to seriously learn photography if all you've been using up to now is a phone camera. However, I think that there are three features any camera you choose has to have if you really want to learn photography deeply, and those three features will rule ...


20

In general you will find a great deal of distaste for bridge cameras here and on most photography forums. In a few unique circumstances they can be good options (very inexpensive super zoom) but for most people they aren't recommended. Sensor size is a big deal Why not get a bridge camera? Since they were introduced and became somewhat popular, the market ...


16

I can't settle for an alternative that's not vertically 360 degrees (or at least much more than 180 degrees). A camera that shoots in every possible direction is said to have a field of view of 360 (horizontal) x 180 (vertical) degrees. Having more than that means you will be capturing some or all of the scene twice. Consider an imaginary arc that spans 180 ...


15

GEEKY ANSWER - you have been warned. There's much more to the image quality than just lens and megapixels. The most important factor in any photograph is: Light You can have the best camera and lens in the universe - and that will still be meaningless if you have no light, or very badly lit subject. After that comes... lens. Lens is what bends the light,...


14

It depends on your discipline and self-criticism. If you can truly see the fault in your own work, then yes that is a great way to start. What goes hand-in-hand with this is going to look at photos that you find awesome (books, galleries, museums, even online gallery of famous photographers). This gives you a baseline to know what is possible and lets you ...


13

I would caution AGAINST a Nikon D7000. I love mine. Love it. It's awesome. It's also more camera than a lot of people will really want or need. The D3000 was a lot cheaper, let me get better lenses as I figured out what to do with them, and had nice little tutorials built in. Perfect for a beginning photographer. As a middle case, take the D5100. An ex-...


13

I'll offer a slightly different take: Your current camera is dated, but not really bad. The problems you're having with it, judging by the pictures, are: excessive post processing brightening, which increases noise colour saturation contrast camera shake sensor dirt (visible in the sky on the beach picture) In fact, technically, i like your last picture,...


12

A mirrorless is a system camera and you must therefore carefully consider the system. There 2 major differenciators between systems: Sensor-size: This affects image quality and particularly low-light performance. Four-Thirds and APS-C are popular sizes but there are full-frame options and smaller 1" or 1/1.7" ones too which have noticeably lower image-...


11

Who makes the bottom of the pecking order when it comes to durability? Canon and Nikon probably do. I can't imagine anyone making a DSLR or mirrorless more "disposable" than the newly introduced Canon 4000D (not even offered in the U.S.). It also has the lowest MSRP of just about any interchangeable lens camera on the planet with an APS-C size sensor. But ...


11

It's not the camera, it's the lens. If you want a cheap and good option for shooting portrait pictures, you should definitely purchase in addition to a DSLR, a 50mm f/1.8 "nifty fifty" lens. Do expect to spend $100-$200 for the lens. 50mm is about optimal for portraits, because the relatively long 50mm focal length on crop sensor cameras is long enough to ...


10

Unfortunately, a lot of images like the one you show here are digitally altered and it is difficult to get comparable results. The image above shows the Milky Way, looking approximately at its center, which appears to us to be in the constellation of Sagittarius. To get such a detailed view of the comparatively dark nebulous structures, however, you need ...


10

Big subject. This and any other answer can only be an introduction. You MUST define "cheap" as you see it. What country? Your lens will have an extremely major effect on the result. See below. A P&S can meet your spec but you really want a DSLR. In high light situations some quite basic P&S cameras can work very well. In lower light ("gigs ...


10

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...


10

If money's no object then the 5D mkIII is the better camera in almost all areas (viewfinder, resolution, autofocus, shooting speed, card slots, sync speed, weather sealing, video). Canon make a GP-E2 GPS logger and WFT-E7 wifi grip for the 5D mkIII if you need this functionality. Reasons to go with the 6D would be mostly due to weight (of both the camera ...


9

I know the answers are quite complete, but I still have something to add. The main reason I went for the 600D was the flip LCD, because I'm quite small and it makes it easier to take shots of things higher up, I otherwise wouldn't reach (and a wannabe-periscope on urban explorations). It's although useful for taking close ups of things close to the ground ...


9

Take a look at Are there disadvantages to a prosumer camera for a beginner, aside from cost?. Personally, I think (as you can see in my answer there) that there are enough significant advantages — especially given your expressed interest and background knowledge — that you should consider stretching your initial budget beyond that of an entry-level SLR. I ...


9

First, ALL modern DSLRs are good. There are levels of good but they are all good. Any one will do but there are some differences. Higher end cameras like the Nikon D7000 and Canon 7D you mention and Pentax K-5 family are more efficient to use because they offer more external controls. They let you work faster which is more important when you actually have ...


9

Even keeping the same sensor size and lens parameters you will always save space by fixing the lens. You remove the need for a lens mount interface, lens barrels can be smaller as they gain stiffness from being fixed, you can put some of the lens mechanisms (zoom and focus motors) into the camera body, use leaf shutters instead of focal plane (Sony RX1). So ...


9

TL;DR: There is no risk in buying older generation Canon body. Canon is known for the consistency of lens mounts and compatibility. They have 3 mounts for photography right now, 2+1 actually. Oldest EF mount for fullframe. Younger EF-S mount for crops. Youngest EF-M mount for mirrorless. EF lenses can be used on EF-S bodies directly, not vice versa! Other ...


8

My learning process was: buy camera, shoot a lot, work out why I wasn't happy with my photos, go read up on the specific things I thought were wrong, go back and shoot a lot more photos, have more happiness but still some faults, go back and learn a bit more. It got me comfortable with the camera and the process. Then when I was getting a reasonably decent ...


8

This is a good exercise, and there are some interesting differences between these models which are illustrative of things worth comparing. Technology generations: The Fujifilm camera is from 2010 and the Canon model from two years earlier. Electronics continue their march of getting cheaper and faster, and in general newer models have an advantage — ...


8

Print out a nice gift certificate for her and let her choose the camera. And don't worry about the small hands. I know a small handed photographer that has no problem with big equipment.


8

Specifically speaking to optical zoom, I would say it is very important and a great benefit to have optical zoom over no optical zoom. Practically speaking to the three cameras you noted though, the difference between 10x and 16x is not very important. At 10x you are going to be zoomed to a 35mm equivalent of 250mm, which is quite a lot of zoom. At that ...


8

I never tried to hold a 384e mm zoom on such a camera, but as @dpolitt mentioned it might be very difficult. You may want to try that at a store or read up on that. But, leaving any other image quality aspects aside, I think the wide angle focal length might be much more interesting. 24e to 28e mm, from your given comparison, is quite a difference which ...


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